Broke out the vibratory tumbler last night (AKA: restoring an American Browning)

Broke out the vibratory tumbler last night (AKA: restoring an American Browning)

Timberwolf
Timberwolf

February 23rd, 2012, 5:39 pm #1

I've been working on restoring a 70+ year old Remington "American Browning" Auto 5 shotgun off and on for several months. Last night I tore down the receiver and action. What a mess... decades of dirt and grime. I was cleaning parts up with 00 steel wool, and wasn't doing bad, but then I remembered my tumbler. I have steel shot, corn cob (for polishing brass) and ceramic "stones" on the shelf. I've never used the ceramic, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Here's some results:

Before


After


And that decades of grime I mentioned? Here's an example:


More pics here if you want to see how it looked before, and how the gun is progressing overall. I kinda laughed when I took out the magazine spring and found what they used to "plug" it for waterfowl hunting.
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Stumpy
Stumpy

February 23rd, 2012, 6:03 pm #2

Hard not to like the Auto 5. Good to see one being brought back to life. I like the magazine plug, I wonder if they did that in the field after getting caught?

If I may ask, what is the other gun in photo 10? I've never seen a bolt action with a tube magazine.
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Timberwolf
Timberwolf

February 23rd, 2012, 6:15 pm #3

More info here:
http://www.swissrifles.com/vetterli/

Basically a 150 year old rim fire rifle. That one had been modified by previous owners and had some incorrect parts. I ended up trading it for a Remington Nylon Mohawk 10c
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Armorer
Armorer

February 24th, 2012, 5:14 pm #4

I've been working on restoring a 70+ year old Remington "American Browning" Auto 5 shotgun off and on for several months. Last night I tore down the receiver and action. What a mess... decades of dirt and grime. I was cleaning parts up with 00 steel wool, and wasn't doing bad, but then I remembered my tumbler. I have steel shot, corn cob (for polishing brass) and ceramic "stones" on the shelf. I've never used the ceramic, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Here's some results:

Before


After


And that decades of grime I mentioned? Here's an example:


More pics here if you want to see how it looked before, and how the gun is progressing overall. I kinda laughed when I took out the magazine spring and found what they used to "plug" it for waterfowl hunting.
Are actually pretty common.
In all my years gunsmithing, I could probably do a pretty decent midget burning man with all the ones I've retrieved from mag tubes.
The most expensive? A Belgium A5.
Guy waned me to do, just as you, a light refurb and clean after getting it in a swap for a lasercam table, comp, and plasma cutter.
Same as you, I pulled the stop to find a nicely whittled chunk of...poison sumac.
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Salda007
Salda007

February 24th, 2012, 5:28 pm #5

I've been working on restoring a 70+ year old Remington "American Browning" Auto 5 shotgun off and on for several months. Last night I tore down the receiver and action. What a mess... decades of dirt and grime. I was cleaning parts up with 00 steel wool, and wasn't doing bad, but then I remembered my tumbler. I have steel shot, corn cob (for polishing brass) and ceramic "stones" on the shelf. I've never used the ceramic, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Here's some results:

Before


After


And that decades of grime I mentioned? Here's an example:


More pics here if you want to see how it looked before, and how the gun is progressing overall. I kinda laughed when I took out the magazine spring and found what they used to "plug" it for waterfowl hunting.
Let's see how my gun-ID-fu is today...

I admit that I don't know most of the pistols, aside from that pretty Colt Navy revolver. I could probably do some digging to come up with the others, but I'm technically on the clock right now .

At the top with all the bells and whistles is a very modified AR-15 (or M4 if it's full-auto). Next down is a Remington shotgun (870?) and some flavor of AK. Down and to the left is another Browning Auto 5, with the Swiss rifle underneath, and then two Mosin-Nagants at the bottom. Right?

Good looking arsenal!
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Timberwolf
Timberwolf

February 24th, 2012, 5:41 pm #6

You did pretty well. The AK is a Hungarian model, in case you wondered.

As far as the pistols go...



Left-to-right, top-to-bottom we have a Taurus .44 Mag, Rossi .44 special, I can't recall much about the flare pistol but I know it was used in aircraft (the twist lugs locked it into an overhead panel for easy access by the pilot. The instructions talk about how much power it has and to try and use two hands if possible), Pietta copy of a Navy .32 black powder, Raven .25 auto, Glock (19?), Navy signal pistol, Iver Johnson .22 revolver

I think the only thing on that table I still own is the A5 at this point. All of those pistols (except the pietta and raven) came home with me from an auction on Jan 1st 2011 and have been long since traded or sold off.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

February 24th, 2012, 9:21 pm #7

Are actually pretty common.
In all my years gunsmithing, I could probably do a pretty decent midget burning man with all the ones I've retrieved from mag tubes.
The most expensive? A Belgium A5.
Guy waned me to do, just as you, a light refurb and clean after getting it in a swap for a lasercam table, comp, and plasma cutter.
Same as you, I pulled the stop to find a nicely whittled chunk of...poison sumac.
nuclear tacos
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Chase
Chase

February 25th, 2012, 10:39 pm #8

You did pretty well. The AK is a Hungarian model, in case you wondered.

As far as the pistols go...



Left-to-right, top-to-bottom we have a Taurus .44 Mag, Rossi .44 special, I can't recall much about the flare pistol but I know it was used in aircraft (the twist lugs locked it into an overhead panel for easy access by the pilot. The instructions talk about how much power it has and to try and use two hands if possible), Pietta copy of a Navy .32 black powder, Raven .25 auto, Glock (19?), Navy signal pistol, Iver Johnson .22 revolver

I think the only thing on that table I still own is the A5 at this point. All of those pistols (except the pietta and raven) came home with me from an auction on Jan 1st 2011 and have been long since traded or sold off.
Used flares for communicating to ground and ambulance crews while flying in the pattern. 2 flares meant wounded on board and the crews would race to the aircraft pretty much just as it stopped rolling. IIRC, a good visual of this was present in Memphis Belle (probably the most accurate part of the entire movie...)I am unsure of any other combination of flares and meanings, but I think Google could produce something rather quickly.
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Chase
Chase

February 25th, 2012, 10:44 pm #9

You did pretty well. The AK is a Hungarian model, in case you wondered.

As far as the pistols go...



Left-to-right, top-to-bottom we have a Taurus .44 Mag, Rossi .44 special, I can't recall much about the flare pistol but I know it was used in aircraft (the twist lugs locked it into an overhead panel for easy access by the pilot. The instructions talk about how much power it has and to try and use two hands if possible), Pietta copy of a Navy .32 black powder, Raven .25 auto, Glock (19?), Navy signal pistol, Iver Johnson .22 revolver

I think the only thing on that table I still own is the A5 at this point. All of those pistols (except the pietta and raven) came home with me from an auction on Jan 1st 2011 and have been long since traded or sold off.
http://www.398th.org/Research/398th_FAQ.html

3.What were the flares used for on B-17s?
Answer: Flares were used as signaling devices in special circumstances. The 398th B-17s had a standard Very pistol installation in the overhead panel of the pilots compartment. The Very pistol was originally invented by Edward W. Very in 1877 and had long history of use for military and nautical signaling, particularly at night and in low light conditions. A B-17 crew member could load a Very pistol with a cartridge, connect the muzzle of the pistol into the discharge socket with a twisting motion and fire a flare into the air above the airplane. A number of flare colors, including red and green, were used for different purposes. Lead crews could use flares to convey prearranged signals to their formations while in flight. Firing red flares was a serious business, especially when used during landing after returning from a mission because this signal meant there was trouble on board, such as wounded. [Contributed by Wally Blackwell, December 2003]

The following three quotes about flares were excerpted from Thirty Four to Go by Ernest H. Walthall, First Officer.

"All signals to start engines, taxi and takeoff were with lights and flares from the control tower. Radio silence as much as possible during the entire mission." ..... "Ahead we could see the group forming and we also spotted our squadron leader firing green-green flares. It only took a few minutes to get into formation and the group leader stated the group would leave on course, climbing in ten minutes, this meant that those who were late arriving would have to catch up or it they could not find the group, would have to go to war with someone else." ..... "It was normal peel off and landing. Some of the planes were shooting flares while in the traffic pattern. Green flares were unofficial, but meant someone had completed their tour of duty, but red meant that someone was wounded. Yellow serious damage to the aircraft. The ground crews were out watching on the ramp, hoping their planes were not damaged much."

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