At a certain point it stops being a collection...

At a certain point it stops being a collection...

Joined: September 26th, 2014, 3:22 am

April 1st, 2017, 1:23 am #1

And becomes an accumulation. How ruthlessly you can winnow it down becomes the question. Swamps took the nuclear option.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

April 1st, 2017, 9:07 pm #2

Usually, somebody has a painting or some other collectible that the person was given/rescued at the last minute/picked out of the trash that turns out to be worth big bucks. Bo

Maybe the Boys and Girls club could turn this windfall into a clubhouse/animal shelter/homeless shelter.
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 2nd, 2017, 6:13 am #3

I've only seen maybe two episodes of Antiques Roadshow (or some similar show) so I'm hardly the one to know, but I've always wondered about some of the bits that don't get televised.

Kind of like that one Simpsons episode where the family decides they have to sell a grandparent's antique civil war figurine, which later turns out to be a liquor bottle from the 70s.

How many times does someone bring in some "valuable antique", that their parents or grandparents had told them was worth a fortune, only to have one of the experts tell them it was a reprint or reproduction, or was simply made in such huge quantities they're nearly worthless, etc.

How many arguments erupt from that?

Doc.
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

April 2nd, 2017, 3:53 pm #4

Some old TV show head an episode where the characters planned to take a junk object and make their disappointed faces. Turns out what they took was expensive.
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Joined: January 28th, 2016, 9:10 am

April 3rd, 2017, 4:05 pm #5

I've only seen maybe two episodes of Antiques Roadshow (or some similar show) so I'm hardly the one to know, but I've always wondered about some of the bits that don't get televised.

Kind of like that one Simpsons episode where the family decides they have to sell a grandparent's antique civil war figurine, which later turns out to be a liquor bottle from the 70s.

How many times does someone bring in some "valuable antique", that their parents or grandparents had told them was worth a fortune, only to have one of the experts tell them it was a reprint or reproduction, or was simply made in such huge quantities they're nearly worthless, etc.

How many arguments erupt from that?

Doc.
Actual the huge quantities kitsh can be quite valuable, but just not right away. What makes the valuable is they're sole goal it to be pleasing to it's contraries, but not particularly preserved. this means the huge numbers have a half life and become illustrative of an age at a later period. Your grandkids or great grandkids can actual see an increased value your to mass produced kitch if it's still in good nick then.

Where as "collector items" on the other hand often don't have lasting value ones the fad bubble burst.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

April 3rd, 2017, 6:30 pm #6

I've only seen maybe two episodes of Antiques Roadshow (or some similar show) so I'm hardly the one to know, but I've always wondered about some of the bits that don't get televised.

Kind of like that one Simpsons episode where the family decides they have to sell a grandparent's antique civil war figurine, which later turns out to be a liquor bottle from the 70s.

How many times does someone bring in some "valuable antique", that their parents or grandparents had told them was worth a fortune, only to have one of the experts tell them it was a reprint or reproduction, or was simply made in such huge quantities they're nearly worthless, etc.

How many arguments erupt from that?

Doc.
I've been watching Antiques Roadshow for ... um ... decades. (I'm not addicted! I can stop at any time! Usually between seasons.) They do show items that are not valuable for various reasons, such as the item is a fake or (as you surmised) because the item is a reprint/reproduction/was mass produced. Sometimes because the market has dropped. ("X years ago, this was worth Y amount, now it's only worth Z dollars.)

I've also seen it go the other way, where somebody thought the item would be worth a few hundred dollars and find out that it's worth much, much more. There have been several people who looked so shocked that I hoped that there were paramedics standing by.

I have yet to see anybody get mad at, or argue with, the appraisers for a bad evaluation.
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 3rd, 2017, 6:39 pm #7

I guess I was wondering if such things happened, off camera.

I mean, obviously they're not going to televise some poor schmo standing up and yelling "you lying bastard!" to the presenter, and then storming off. Or breaking into tears and trying to attack the presenter, or something.

One assumes that in this world of connected media, even if such a happening happened but didn't get televised, we'd still hear about it.

"Upset owner bashes Antiques Roadshow presenter with $20 million painting that turned out to be worthless reproduction!"

Doc.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

April 3rd, 2017, 7:00 pm #8

I've never heard of a fight, either. The closest was me (at home) yelling insults at the TV because the appraiser was a complete ignoramus.

Not that I'm an antiques expert, but I've been a Disney fan since I was a kid. One person brought in animation stills from Snow White. The "expert" pointed to a cell with a squirrel and a chipmunk and claimed that they were Chip and Dale. Oy!

Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

April 3rd, 2017, 8:17 pm #9

I guess I was wondering if such things happened, off camera.

I mean, obviously they're not going to televise some poor schmo standing up and yelling "you lying bastard!" to the presenter, and then storming off. Or breaking into tears and trying to attack the presenter, or something.

One assumes that in this world of connected media, even if such a happening happened but didn't get televised, we'd still hear about it.

"Upset owner bashes Antiques Roadshow presenter with $20 million painting that turned out to be worthless reproduction!"

Doc.
Including behave themselves in public, if the guy with the camera crew tells them to.
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 5:42 pm

April 10th, 2017, 5:52 pm #10

I've only seen maybe two episodes of Antiques Roadshow (or some similar show) so I'm hardly the one to know, but I've always wondered about some of the bits that don't get televised.

Kind of like that one Simpsons episode where the family decides they have to sell a grandparent's antique civil war figurine, which later turns out to be a liquor bottle from the 70s.

How many times does someone bring in some "valuable antique", that their parents or grandparents had told them was worth a fortune, only to have one of the experts tell them it was a reprint or reproduction, or was simply made in such huge quantities they're nearly worthless, etc.

How many arguments erupt from that?

Doc.
...this might still be of interest. If you wanted to search for them, I'm sure you'd be able to find some of those "I as on Antiques Roadshow and..." type articles that lift the veil a little. The important thing that comes out of any coverage of the Roadshow is that the experts are competing with each other to get on camera just as much as the guests, if not more.

The part you see on camera is actually the second interview/appraisal. When you enter with Auntie's antimacassar or whatever, you first line up for an expert sitting at one of a number of tables divided by subject. There will be two or three furniture experts, for example. This is all off-camera. They will quickly evaluate it, and that's mostly where the "This is a worthless piece of crap"-type of news gets broken to the owners. So it's a controlled environment.

While you are waiting to get your antimacassar appraisal, the appraiser is looking for some sort of hook they can pitch to the producers. Some are obvious. "Your foster father's grandmother claimed she got this from Kit Carson and that's a common enough style of family legend usually hiding something not worth very much yet I can tell it's one of the only verifiable weavings of this style from the nineteenth century and it's a national treasure worth half a million dollars." That will always get to camera, of course. (Actually happened:http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/season ... 200101A48/).

That is the exception, obviously. Some of the stories get to air specifically because they aren't such bombshells. I've seen pieces make it specifically because they're fakes, but the producers think it will be good education for the viewers, for example. Another common sort is the, "You've an example of antique collectible X and let's talk about what to look for when a viewer sees one" story.

As to arguments, well, these are PBS viewers, after all. They're not generally pugnacious types. I've seen obvious "But Grandpappy told me he got this from Babe Ruth himself, what do you mean it's a fake?" moments. That is the exception, however, and those folks seem to be by and large disappointed and disheartened, not angry.

The worst incident I know of was back in 2001, and involved the experts rather than the guests. Two Civil War dealers were convicted of wire and mail fraud for cheating people with low appraisals for expensive relics they purchased at those low prices and then flipped for much more. This all happened outside of the show, of course, but they did use a shill to present some items on-camera to build their credibility.

Wow, that was long. Sorry about the infodump, but hopefully it's useful to somebody.
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