Anyone know/remember Ozzy and Millie

Anyone know/remember Ozzy and Millie

Joined: November 13th, 2017, 9:08 pm

February 3rd, 2018, 10:44 pm #1

I know that I'm late with this, but was the 31's parchessi joke an Ozzy and Millie reference? It's the only thing that I can think of that has Parchessi as a running joke.
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

February 3rd, 2018, 10:57 pm #2

I vaguely remember the house rules Parcheesi.

I actually bought two original Ozz & Millie strips years ago. I have a Sunday strip from after the style change, and the first of the hair cut running gag strips.

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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

February 4th, 2018, 5:30 am #3

I know that I'm late with this, but was the 31's parchessi joke an Ozzy and Millie reference? It's the only thing that I can think of that has Parchessi as a running joke.
This one:
http://www.the-whiteboard.com/autotwb2367.html

Urban Dictionary has another possible explanation:

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define. ... =Parcheesi
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 4th, 2018, 10:24 am #4

I know that I'm late with this, but was the 31's parchessi joke an Ozzy and Millie reference? It's the only thing that I can think of that has Parchessi as a running joke.
Ozy & Millie was one of the first webcomics I ever started reading regularly, and I still rate it as one of the best webcomics ever produced.

But no, the "parcheesi" joke predates even O&M by a long ways. It was first associated as a "metaphor for sex" in a 1964 Audrey Hepburn movie, something like "Paris when it Sizzles", so something like that.

She plays a secretary to a lazy writer, and at one point she's reading a partial script, and expresses annoyance when she comes to the part where the scrips goes "... and the couple leans closer, kisses, and '...'".

She asks why always use that kind of literary subterfuge, since the reader always knows the couple is going to have sex.

The writer counters that she must have a dirty mind, since for all you know, they could just be playing Parcheesi".

It doesn't hurt that it's a funny-sounding word, either. It wouldn't sound as flippant if he'd said "playing chess" or "playing dominoes". O&M almost assuredly used it for the same reason- the name itself has a funny tone.

Doc.
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Joined: November 13th, 2017, 9:08 pm

February 5th, 2018, 11:10 am #5

I vaguely remember the house rules Parcheesi.

I actually bought two original Ozz & Millie strips years ago. I have a Sunday strip from after the style change, and the first of the hair cut running gag strips.
That's great! I still have never met anyone in person who knows what the hell I'm taking about. Plus, I liked it a little more before the style change, because it was nice looking, and less strangely political. If I had ever had the money or the opportunity, I would like to have bought one too.
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Joined: November 13th, 2017, 9:08 pm

February 5th, 2018, 11:14 am #6

Ozy & Millie was one of the first webcomics I ever started reading regularly, and I still rate it as one of the best webcomics ever produced.

But no, the "parcheesi" joke predates even O&M by a long ways. It was first associated as a "metaphor for sex" in a 1964 Audrey Hepburn movie, something like "Paris when it Sizzles", so something like that.

She plays a secretary to a lazy writer, and at one point she's reading a partial script, and expresses annoyance when she comes to the part where the scrips goes "... and the couple leans closer, kisses, and '...'".

She asks why always use that kind of literary subterfuge, since the reader always knows the couple is going to have sex.

The writer counters that she must have a dirty mind, since for all you know, they could just be playing Parcheesi".

It doesn't hurt that it's a funny-sounding word, either. It wouldn't sound as flippant if he'd said "playing chess" or "playing dominoes". O&M almost assuredly used it for the same reason- the name itself has a funny tone.

Doc.
Thanks, Doc. The cleverness of this strip nevermind ceases to impress me, and it's really cool to know you read Ozzy and Millie. Did you ever speak with the artist, Dana Simpson I think?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 5th, 2018, 11:33 am #7

No, never. Back when I was active on a lot of the comics boards (back when there were some good comics boards) I never even heard of DC being a member or participating. I got the impression he/she wasn't all that "social", for want of a better term.

Doc.
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

February 5th, 2018, 2:19 pm #8

Actually, I believe She is the right word these days.
Many people going through her situation tends to be reclusive and shy away from anything social.

I did communicate with Dana once or twice back when OzyandMillie ran, but then in emails.

Her latest work 'Phoebe and her Unicorn' is now going to show up in the Daily Hampshire Gazette.
(Wow, a newspaper that actually listens to their readers... )

That one's not for me, though.
But I do have the two collected volumes of the OzyandMillie cartoon at home.

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Joined: February 17th, 2017, 2:34 pm

February 5th, 2018, 6:03 pm #9

Ozy & Millie was one of the first webcomics I ever started reading regularly, and I still rate it as one of the best webcomics ever produced.

But no, the "parcheesi" joke predates even O&M by a long ways. It was first associated as a "metaphor for sex" in a 1964 Audrey Hepburn movie, something like "Paris when it Sizzles", so something like that.

She plays a secretary to a lazy writer, and at one point she's reading a partial script, and expresses annoyance when she comes to the part where the scrips goes "... and the couple leans closer, kisses, and '...'".

She asks why always use that kind of literary subterfuge, since the reader always knows the couple is going to have sex.

The writer counters that she must have a dirty mind, since for all you know, they could just be playing Parcheesi".

It doesn't hurt that it's a funny-sounding word, either. It wouldn't sound as flippant if he'd said "playing chess" or "playing dominoes". O&M almost assuredly used it for the same reason- the name itself has a funny tone.

Doc.
I couldn't find a youtube post a while back and didn't bother to look now. I forget the background, but it led to this:

Rocky: "Girls?? What kind of games can you play with them??"
Bullwinkle: "Boy, this is a kids' show isn't it? Parcheesi!"

Also, I don't remember Parcheesi in O&M - anybody got any links?
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

February 5th, 2018, 6:48 pm #10

That's great! I still have never met anyone in person who knows what the hell I'm taking about. Plus, I liked it a little more before the style change, because it was nice looking, and less strangely political. If I had ever had the money or the opportunity, I would like to have bought one too.
Yeah, "Ozy and Millie" was a good 'un - though I do agree with the "strangely political" thing. Sometimes I agreed with it, sometimes I didn't, but it never felt like it belonged. Probably because I hate hate hate the idea of children - even fictional ones - being used as political mouthpieces. But anyway.

I actually have copies of the first two books somewhere in my collection of early webcomic memorabilia. I'll probably never read 'em again, if I'm being honest. Would you like to buy them? I'd sell them for the cover price, whatever that may have been.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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