Airplane Rebuild - Like Project Binky, but diffrent

Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

August 2nd, 2018, 12:57 am #1

If you like Project Binky, and Doc's rebuilding posts, you'll probably like watching Mike Patey rebuild his Wilga bush-plane.  

It's like Project Binky in that he is doing a complete rebuild, with a completely different, far more powerful motor, along with more upgrades than you can imagine, Like new fuel tanks, new lights, entirely new wiring, with very fine attention to detail.  Making all his needed brackets, doing his own welding, etc.

It's different from Project Binky, in that this guy's got $MONEY$, and isn't afraid to use it.  You kind of have to, if you want to put a 680hp turbine engine into a bush-plane.  But you'll be amazed at how hard he personally works on this thing.    Oh, also, He's just finished it too.

You can find the 20 videos here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSvdee ... /playlists
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 5th, 2018, 7:27 am #2

That, I have to say, is pretty cool, at least for the one episode I watched.

There is a but much "watch me throw a giant shovelful of cash at this problem", but on the other side of that coin, he's in there doing the work, designing the parts and doing the engineering himself. He's not just drawing up a cocktail napkin, handing it off to a professional shop, and sitting back to sip a mai-tai.

And trust me, if I had that kind of cash to dispose of as I saw fit, I'd probably be doing something similar. 😁

I will say, though, that I found it rather absurd they used a big 8" slice of solid bar to make that light mounting ring. That's a huge amount of aluminum turned into wasted chips- the finished piece was only like 1/4" thick! They couldn't have started with a chunk of thickwall tubing? Or spent ten minutes on a bandsaw chopping a 7" coin out of the middle? (Lots of industrial bandsaws have built-in blade welders, so you can part a band, loop it through a starter hole, and weld it back together right there at the saw, so you can cut out closed areas.)

Still can't beat Project Binky- partly because I prefer the subject matter (I'm a car guy, not a plane guy) but mainly because they tend to explain things more. I love hearing the bits about how and why this or that part was made or used or done.

Doc.
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Joined: September 11th, 2014, 5:40 pm

August 5th, 2018, 12:47 pm #3

Also i prefer binky because they show all the work, instead of showing the aftermath of doing said work... Still awesome though
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Joined: September 11th, 2014, 5:58 pm

August 5th, 2018, 2:49 pm #4

Are you also waiting to find out the next prediction in our lightweight laminated cardboard future? ;)
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 5th, 2018, 6:35 pm #5

"While I'm sure that lightweight laminated cardboard turbochargers are indeed the future, we're not quite there yet."

😁

Doc.
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

August 5th, 2018, 8:38 pm #6

DocsMachine wrote: "While I'm sure that lightweight laminated cardboard turbochargers are indeed the future, we're not quite there yet."
With all the crap people are building out of carbon fiber these days, I'm surprised. A few layers each of CF and Kraft paper laminated with the right epoxy would probably work.
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

August 6th, 2018, 12:55 am #7

The Project Binky work is mainly designed by experience plus a dose of 'suck it and see' engineering. You can't get away with that with flying contraptions - we're a bit past the 'have a maiden sacrifice a goat by the light of the full moon' stage of designing, and if you're going to change airfoil designs and sizes for a give fuselage and power plant, there's an awful lot of number-crunching that needs to go on before you start gluing things together. I bet he, or his designer, is using something more powerful than X-Plane (the aviation equivalent of Kerbal) to calculate his designs, and it'll be interesting to see if any long-term problems pop up. (eg, the original aircraft fatigue calculations were designed to cope with the vibrations of a 2700 rpm piston engine - what effects will the different vibration frequencies from a high speed turbine, and (usually) slower speed prop cause over time?)

But still a cool project, and I wish I could afford his 'garage'!
Breakfast.com halted. Cereal port not ready.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 6th, 2018, 8:51 am #8

hinermad wrote:With all the crap people are building out of carbon fiber these days, I'm surprised. A few layers each of CF and Kraft paper laminated with the right epoxy would probably work.
-Not on a turbo. Too much heat on the exhaust side- that's pretty much always going to have to be a metal or at least ceramic composite at best.

And usually too much RPM on the intake side- again, not many even carbon fiber composites can stand up to 150,000 RPM for long.

Laminated cardboard? We're still testing. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

August 7th, 2018, 7:48 pm #9

Beejay5169 wrote: The Project Binky work is mainly designed by experience plus a dose of 'suck it and see' engineering. You can't get away with that with flying contraptions - we're a bit past the 'have a maiden sacrifice a goat by the light of the full moon' stage of designing, and if you're going to change airfoil designs and sizes for a give fuselage and power plant, there's an awful lot of number-crunching that needs to go on before you start gluing things together. I bet he, or his designer, is using something more powerful than X-Plane (the aviation equivalent of Kerbal) to calculate his designs, and it'll be interesting to see if any long-term problems pop up. (eg, the original aircraft fatigue calculations were designed to cope with the vibrations of a 2700 rpm piston engine - what effects will the different vibration frequencies from a high speed turbine, and (usually) slower speed prop cause over time?)

But still a cool project, and I wish I could afford his 'garage'!
My money would lean toward SolidWorks, or some aviation-specific iteration thereof?
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

August 7th, 2018, 8:54 pm #10

No turbochargers out of carbon fiber, laminated cardboard, fiberglass, resins and composites, but they'll certainly work for the air intake bits and plumbing.  And they make nice shrouds without panel beating or struggling with an English Wheel and annealing huge aluminum sheets.

And "Cardboard Aided Design" translates to composite shrouds really easy.
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