Actual machining content!

Actual machining content!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 7:42 am #1

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.
Last edited by DocsMachine on February 14th, 2018, 7:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 11th, 2014, 5:40 pm

February 14th, 2018, 11:51 am #2

But those are hardly cheap, or i suspect capable of pushing enough volume for your application (nor is the reservoir big enough for "industrial equipment"
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

February 14th, 2018, 5:14 pm #3

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.
Not knowing how they would react to a coolant other than pure water, I'd look a a garden fountain pump. Home Depo has them in the garden section here in SC.
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

February 14th, 2018, 5:53 pm #4

My thought is park the fountain pump in a 5 gallon bucket for a reservoir, and if needed, upsize it if that's not getting the job done. use a lid on the bucket to keep chips n debris from getting in, and if you can find a clear bucket, that'll make it easier to keep an eye on the levels.

Granted, the only thing that I have that's water cooled is my truck, so I'm probably waaaay off.
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

February 14th, 2018, 6:22 pm #5

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.
Here at my work, we have a couple of expensive, real equipment water chillers, but I think about half our equipment is still running off fountain pumps sitting in trashcans filled with water. For the size of your system, I think a 5 to 10 gallon bucket or drum would be enough.

Heck, my race car only uses a 5 gallon water container for cooling. Admittedly it only has about a 100 to 1 duty cycle.
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Joined: August 10th, 2005, 1:21 am

February 14th, 2018, 6:29 pm #6

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.
if you want you may just need to add a cover if you wish probably holds a gallon+
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

February 14th, 2018, 6:35 pm #7

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.

"All I needs is four stout men to work the bellows!"
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: September 19th, 2014, 6:28 am

February 14th, 2018, 8:18 pm #8

Not knowing how they would react to a coolant other than pure water, I'd look a a garden fountain pump. Home Depo has them in the garden section here in SC.
Automobiles run a propylene glycol / water mix mainly to lower the freezing point of the coolant. It also rises the boiling point, but I think that's more to do with pressurizing the radiator.

Plain water (preferably distilled or at least reverse-osmosis filtered water) will cool most other stuff fine. If you are boiling water with a CNC router, you have bigger issues than cooling

If the water freezing is an issue some RV antifreeze could be used as I don't think that hurts plastic.

For pumps, I don't think you need much flow to keep a spindle cool. A small (1/4" - 3/8") water pump will suffice, but if you put a tank above the spindle you could probably get a thermosiphon system going and not need a pump.

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Joined: October 11th, 2014, 3:36 am

February 15th, 2018, 2:20 am #9

It's not much, but geez, I've been spending so much time on the books lately I think I was forgetting how this stuff works.

Anyway, I really need to get my Shapeoko router up and ready to do some work, which means three things: A dust enclosure, a dust-collection system, and a new spindle.

I could have kept using the DeWalt router it came with, but those are loud, and usually die in flames in anywhere from 100 to 200 hours. I'd picked up a 1.5KW (2HP) high speed water-cooled spindle off of eBay, but as I mentioned not too long ago, I'd outsmarted myself- the 2HP version was too big and heavy for my machine.

I sold that off to another Guilder, and bought myself an 800KW/1HP version. I'd started on a set of mounting brackets a while back, and as I was trying to remind myself where the heck I was in the shop before being so rudely interrupted by this whole book thing, I found the half-machined blanks.

An hour or two of finish machining...



And voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "hey, come check this sh*t out!" )



They're pretty basic mounts but strong and functional. I'll need to undo/redo all the cables, as the router cord is firmly zip-tied into place, and then figure out something to do with the water-cooling hoses.

I'm now accepting recommendations on what sort of water pump to get, too. Anybody know if there's a one-piece reservoir type container with a pump built into the lid, or something, out there? That doesn't cost an arm and six of my eighteen toes?

Doc.
The first question that will need to asked is this: how much heat will that motor put out? The answer(s) will depend on two aspects, the cutting load and/or the length of time of running. A short heavy cutting load will not create much heat, nor will a longer but lighter cutting.

Then comes the question of how MUCH cooling will be needed. If you are operating it where is will be generating lots of heat, then you will need sufficient flow of coolant to remove that heat. I would strongly suggest using a pump that will produce sufficient flow to cool the motor at the high heat end. That way you will ensure that it will stay cool no matter what cutting load you have. A simple circulation pump should work well enough, but meant to run for hours on end to ensure it will not fail in the middle of things on you.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... L1500_.jpg

The next aspect is the storage tank size. The larger the tank the greater the heat 'sink' capability it will have. This will probably take some experimentation to figure out. The one component to help is to add a radiator with a fan to the return line to remove the heat from the coolant, if needed.

Monitoring the fluid temperature should be real easy, just use a cheap kitchen thermometer.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... L1000_.jpg

I would also suggest some way of being able to see if the coolant is flowing. My first thought was of a water wheel in a window. If the wheel is rotating fast enough then the things are fine. A second method would be a ball flow meter. Less moving parts to deal with.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... L1023_.jpg

One part that may or may not be needed is some type of filter to remove any type of unwanted mater from the fluid. If the system is enclosed enough to prevent things from getting in then the odds would be against needing a filtration component.

Hope this give you something to would with for your design.
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

February 15th, 2018, 3:05 am #10

Automobiles run a propylene glycol / water mix mainly to lower the freezing point of the coolant. It also rises the boiling point, but I think that's more to do with pressurizing the radiator.

Plain water (preferably distilled or at least reverse-osmosis filtered water) will cool most other stuff fine. If you are boiling water with a CNC router, you have bigger issues than cooling

If the water freezing is an issue some RV antifreeze could be used as I don't think that hurts plastic.

For pumps, I don't think you need much flow to keep a spindle cool. A small (1/4" - 3/8") water pump will suffice, but if you put a tank above the spindle you could probably get a thermosiphon system going and not need a pump.
Ethylene Glycol poisonous for autos, Propylene Glycol safe for drinking water systems.

And yes, you only raise the boiling point significantly if it's pressurized.

If you think it needs positive flow, find a peristaltic pump like the chemical metering pump for swimming pool chlorine - Length of Kynar hose and a roller drum. You can make a flow indicator with a little spinner or some poly beads in a window...

5-gallon bucket should be fine for the reservoir. No radiators at the rate you're making heat.
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