A question for tool users everywhere!

Joined: October 11th, 2014, 3:36 am

July 8th, 2018, 4:11 am #1

Just how fast do you progress down the list?


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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

July 8th, 2018, 4:15 am #2

Ah yes, the "blue tip wrench".  
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

July 8th, 2018, 4:39 am #3

Sadly, I don't own the one on the bottom; However, I do have a couple breaker bars and a 48 oz. deadblow hammer, and a proper sledge if that doesn't work.
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Joined: June 11th, 2005, 8:35 am

July 8th, 2018, 5:13 am #4

Only one missing is the length of pipe that fits over the breaker bar with the caption, "No really, I insist."

With that and a couple of old lead hammers I can get most stuff unstuck.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 8th, 2018, 7:28 am #5

MephitMark wrote:Just how fast do you progress down the list?
-Generally, not as fast as you might think. 😁

I have an extensive collection of tools I can use to remove whatever needs to be removed, and a pretty fair library of tricks that can be used, depending on the situation.

Yes, there have indeed been times I moved up that list in short order and wound up with the gas-axe. But more often, the gas axe is used to heat (not to red, that's not necessary) a nut, and then the whole mess is sprayed with WD-40. As the part cools, it wicks the lube in, and the residual heat keeps it slightly expanded.

But I've also slit nuts with an air cutoff wheel and split the rest with a small chisel, I've pushed stubborn parts apart with the press (stuff that's supposed to be a sliding fit, not, you know, threaded parts 😁 ) I've drilled parts out, I've welded bolts and nuts to pieces to get them to unscrew...

One of the things that usually does get "the list" are brake lines. Old brake lines. Where the steel nut has rusted solid to the steel tube and both are rusted solid to the steel hose fitting. 😁

That's usually a case of first a flare nut wrench, then heat and a pair of Vise Grips, then more heat, some Kroil, and enough pressure on the pliers to partially crush the nut- which at this point has long since been mangled anyway- all of which breaks it loose from the fitting but the nut is still stuck to the tube so it barberpoles it and ruins a good three inches of tubing.

Meaning instead of just replacing the rubber hose, now you have to replace the rubber hose, the frame clip, six feet of professionally-bent brake line and jack up the engine to run the line across the crossmember. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

July 8th, 2018, 11:14 am #6

You're missing a can of WD40 or similar between the second and 3rd item.
I don't have a gas axe or similar, but I have used my Dremel to cut apart a ball joint and a few other pieces on my car.  Yes it took time... and yes, I had to replace the cutting disc a couple of times... That's what SpeedClick! is for...
Also, I can confirm the brake lines.
I had to replace the rear brake cylinders. And ended up replacing the pipe connected to it on both sides, the flexible pipe connected to that again, also on both sides, and a long piece from the flexible pipe to the pressure regulator on one side. 18 years of rust, salt, and grime had done its job on those. (Google for Berlingo Rear Axle assembly. The hub and brake is on a long arm, with the flexible hose next to the pivot point. Instead of springs there are torsion bars. And the shocks are mounted at a 45degree angle.)  
It's actually not all that difficult to bend pipe, I learned. And it gave me reason to add another tool to the inventory... ;-)
(replacements came as precut lengths with nuts and flares)
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

July 8th, 2018, 12:51 pm #7

I usually break the bolt before I get to step 2, so I don't even own the last 2.
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

July 8th, 2018, 1:32 pm #8

Also, the difference between a sometimes tinkerer and a home mechanic/pro is that the tinkerer only have ONE breaker bar...
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Joined: November 30th, 2014, 1:36 am

July 8th, 2018, 3:16 pm #9

I occasionally work on farm gear (live in a rural area) and on a lot of that I start with the 1/2" impact, move to the 3/4 drive with a cheater then break out the smoke wrench.  Sometimes I just stage the tanks near the work to scare it into submission, but breaking the blade retaining nuts on a 7' brush hog with a stump jumper usually means you move to the smoke wrench right away.  
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 8th, 2018, 9:23 pm #10

Yeah, a while back I put together a nice collection of 3/4"-drive ratchets, sockets and a breaker bar- I even have a 3-foot-long 3/4"-drive torque wrench around here somewhere (that I've never actually needed or used. 😋 )

And yeah, if a 3/4" breaker bar can't break it loose, it's time for the high explosives.

I do actually have a gigantic Ingersoll-Rand 1"-drive impact wrench, but my compressor literally can't provide enough air to run it at anything close to full power. I've heard a quick-fix for that is a secondary tank with a huge outlet. Your regular compressor fills it, and then you have a 3/4"-bore hose or larger that  feeds the impact gun. You won't be able to sustain a shot very long, but it supposedly gives you a valuable second or two of near-full-power to snap the bolt loose.

Haven't tried that, because like the torque wrench, I haven't really needed it.

Doc.
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