9/4/17 - My Grandma Was a Welder

9/4/17 - My Grandma Was a Welder

Joined: January 27th, 2016, 1:59 pm

September 4th, 2017, 1:38 pm #1

My family, whenever they'd go to grab something hot, and someone else would say, "Be careful! That's hot!" the response would be, "It's ok. My grandma was a welder."
And the thing was, for a while, my grandma was actually a welder (and later was a uniformed police woman, while my grandfather was an Irish Catholic cop in Chicago, because stereotypes come from somewhere).

So, did anyone else ever use that saying, or is it just a quirk of coincidence that this came up?
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Joined: February 2nd, 2017, 2:27 pm

September 4th, 2017, 5:12 pm #2

is the welder of the family.

When we were dating she spotted the little welder in my garage and asked if I would teach her.

From little Horrible Freight $*&*&*!!!-core welder to career as supervisor of welding department at a sheetmetal company.

It took some getting used to, having people stop over and ask "Can your wife weld this for us?" :D
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Joined: October 6th, 2014, 7:12 pm

September 4th, 2017, 9:20 pm #3

My family, whenever they'd go to grab something hot, and someone else would say, "Be careful! That's hot!" the response would be, "It's ok. My grandma was a welder."
And the thing was, for a while, my grandma was actually a welder (and later was a uniformed police woman, while my grandfather was an Irish Catholic cop in Chicago, because stereotypes come from somewhere).

So, did anyone else ever use that saying, or is it just a quirk of coincidence that this came up?
...most of the older women I grew up around looked a lot like slightly-older versions of this:



because they had *been*.... >
CF

"The right tool for the right job." [Anon.]
"Any tool can be the Right Tool." [Red Green]
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

September 5th, 2017, 11:30 am #4

My family, whenever they'd go to grab something hot, and someone else would say, "Be careful! That's hot!" the response would be, "It's ok. My grandma was a welder."
And the thing was, for a while, my grandma was actually a welder (and later was a uniformed police woman, while my grandfather was an Irish Catholic cop in Chicago, because stereotypes come from somewhere).

So, did anyone else ever use that saying, or is it just a quirk of coincidence that this came up?
I went to do some repairs for my grandma on Saturday. When they were done, we had some tea and she told me a story about doing body work on an old Saab she and my grandpa drove around Europe one summer. I don't know if any welding was involved, but it's still close enough to make me smile.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: August 16th, 2017, 1:03 am

September 5th, 2017, 2:41 pm #5

My family, whenever they'd go to grab something hot, and someone else would say, "Be careful! That's hot!" the response would be, "It's ok. My grandma was a welder."
And the thing was, for a while, my grandma was actually a welder (and later was a uniformed police woman, while my grandfather was an Irish Catholic cop in Chicago, because stereotypes come from somewhere).

So, did anyone else ever use that saying, or is it just a quirk of coincidence that this came up?
In my high school years, my mother was the foreman of a laminate glue line for a major cabinet manufacturer. All of 5'4" and skinny as a rail, she had a crew of hefty guys that worked for her loading pre-cut particle board into the automated glue line. As kids, we learned early in our family who not to piss off. Dad might take a belt to our behind, but if mom got mad at you, give your soul to Jesus.
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Joined: February 17th, 2017, 2:34 pm

September 6th, 2017, 11:56 pm #6

My family, whenever they'd go to grab something hot, and someone else would say, "Be careful! That's hot!" the response would be, "It's ok. My grandma was a welder."
And the thing was, for a while, my grandma was actually a welder (and later was a uniformed police woman, while my grandfather was an Irish Catholic cop in Chicago, because stereotypes come from somewhere).

So, did anyone else ever use that saying, or is it just a quirk of coincidence that this came up?
Don't know whether the predator/prey situation has been addressed before (I'm a bit new here and don't have time to go through the strip archives, let alone the MB's).

Not trying to open a can of worms ala Kevin and Kell, but I was just curious...
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 7th, 2017, 12:14 am #7

No. The general rule of thumb for TWB, is that if we haven't explicitly seen an animal as a character, then it's assumed to be 'normal'- nonsentient, nontalking, etc.

I specifically want to stay away from the "Kevin & Kell" predator/prey thing, in large part simply because it can't work in a 'real world' situation. That is, if Rainy was in actual danger of having a predator- fox, bobcat, cougar, bear, etc- catch and eat him, he wouldn't live anywhere near there.

There was a strip, long ago, called "Suburban Jungle", that had that- if you felt like it, you could go into the nearby park, wait for a prey-species jogger to walk by, and attack and eat him.

The problem there is that, if all those animals could think, reason and plan, no prey species in his right mind would ever go into that park. It'd be like you or me voluntarily deciding to go live in North Korea.

So in the TWB world, unlike K&K, by no means is everything sentient. While it's not canon, and will likely never be addressed directly, yes, presumably there are cattle and chicken farms where they're raised for meat, there's presumably commercial fishing operations for cod and salmon, and likely some form of recreational hunting of deer, ducks and moose. (We did, in fact, once see a stuffed moose head in Howie's bar.)

We can presume that, in the TWB world, walrus somehow became a semi-common food, or at least an available delicacy maybe, like Kobe beef.

Or, due to weird convergent evolution in their world, instead of beef cattle and pigs as their two main meat sources, they have moose and walrus.

But overall, generally speaking they get their meat the same way most of us to- in trays from the store, which came from production farms. And no, there's no this-guy-ate-that-guy type of thing- though it's still joked about.

Doc.
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

September 7th, 2017, 1:52 pm #8

One thing I really like about your approach to the TWB world is your pragmatism. It seems like a lot of comics bend over backwards trying to reconcile their worlds with ours, and that's just not necessary. It can be fun from a worldbuilding perspective if it's done well, but too often it either bogs things down with exposition, or makes for the kind of uncomfortable situations you're talking about.

I think the average reader is willing to invoke the MST3K Mantra ("It's just a show, I should really just relax") if the author just says "here's how it is."
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: February 2nd, 2015, 4:36 pm

September 7th, 2017, 5:39 pm #9

Half of humor is incongruity.

In the comment track on one of the Futurama DVDs, Groening and the producers tell how they deliberately had no continuity for the interior of the Planet Express Ship, just to mess with the kind of fans who would try to draw blueprints.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

September 7th, 2017, 7:31 pm #10

No. The general rule of thumb for TWB, is that if we haven't explicitly seen an animal as a character, then it's assumed to be 'normal'- nonsentient, nontalking, etc.

I specifically want to stay away from the "Kevin & Kell" predator/prey thing, in large part simply because it can't work in a 'real world' situation. That is, if Rainy was in actual danger of having a predator- fox, bobcat, cougar, bear, etc- catch and eat him, he wouldn't live anywhere near there.

There was a strip, long ago, called "Suburban Jungle", that had that- if you felt like it, you could go into the nearby park, wait for a prey-species jogger to walk by, and attack and eat him.

The problem there is that, if all those animals could think, reason and plan, no prey species in his right mind would ever go into that park. It'd be like you or me voluntarily deciding to go live in North Korea.

So in the TWB world, unlike K&K, by no means is everything sentient. While it's not canon, and will likely never be addressed directly, yes, presumably there are cattle and chicken farms where they're raised for meat, there's presumably commercial fishing operations for cod and salmon, and likely some form of recreational hunting of deer, ducks and moose. (We did, in fact, once see a stuffed moose head in Howie's bar.)

We can presume that, in the TWB world, walrus somehow became a semi-common food, or at least an available delicacy maybe, like Kobe beef.

Or, due to weird convergent evolution in their world, instead of beef cattle and pigs as their two main meat sources, they have moose and walrus.

But overall, generally speaking they get their meat the same way most of us to- in trays from the store, which came from production farms. And no, there's no this-guy-ate-that-guy type of thing- though it's still joked about.

Doc.
Would you go to a place where 1 in 10 people die? In fact, some of the bodies are sitting next to the main route, in plain sight. Yet people pay an arm and a leg for the privilege of climbing Mt. Everest.
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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