8 heavy boxes just arrived...

8 heavy boxes just arrived...

Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

April 26th, 2018, 9:56 pm #1

My new large format, (24" X 24" X 24") 3D printer kit just arrived.  :-)

My inner child is screaming to open the boxes.

   "Patience inner child.  First we must finish the job we are doing, then we must clear off the work bench."

   "WHAT THE %#&*?!  OPEN THE $%#&*#@ BOXES NOW!!"   (my inner child has a potty mouth.)

   "Settle down, or I'll find some instruments to calibrate first."

   "Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!  This is worse than Christmas Morning!"
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

April 26th, 2018, 10:31 pm #2

... Holy smokes, that's ginormous. Granted, there's a box o stuff for my Raspberry Pi waiting for me; then I get to figure out how to cram a real time clock add-on _under_ the LED matrix HAT I bought for it...
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 27th, 2018, 1:38 am #3

What, pray tell, are you planning to print, that requires a two-foot cube of working area?

And is this a megadollar professional item, or just a typical diy-type desktop unit writ large?

Doc.
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Joined: March 6th, 2018, 8:17 am

April 27th, 2018, 1:50 am #4

Question. It that the size of the work area or the whole machine? 
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Joined: June 2nd, 2015, 3:34 am

April 27th, 2018, 2:58 am #5

What brand and type?

<---16 printer printfarm.   Dying to know what you have.
It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life.
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

April 27th, 2018, 3:20 am #6

The brand is Modix.  They sell a couple variations of one big printer.  It seems to be kind of middle of the road between expensive and cheep.  

For what we're going to print, we need speed and volume, and can sacrifice lots of accuracy.   If we can find a strong enough material, we'll try and print press molds directly.  If it isn't strong enough, we'll print bucks, then make fiberglass molds from those.

They're for foil covered insulation panels for engine covers, exhausts, etc.

The working volume is 24" ^3.   That should cover more than 90% of what we need.  But, much smaller than that, and we'd be gluing too many pieces together.   

Once I have it up and running, (probably a few weeks at the earliest), I'll report on whether or not it's working as expected.
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Joined: January 24th, 2017, 4:37 pm

April 27th, 2018, 4:09 am #7

Something you may be able to try for increased strength when making a press or vacuum bag mold, is to decrease your fill support percentage, and then fill the completed mold from the back with a suitable material to make the mold solid. It'll take a lot less time and material to print, and still get your surface pattern. Just don't use a filler that heats up too much as it sets up. I miss having the Leapfrog Creatr HS I bought at my previous job. I was able to make usable parts for some of the robots, and make test models for other parts before finalizing the designs and sending them out to the machine shop for fabrication in steel and aluminum. I'm in research mode now, looking for a printer of my own, but you can see a picture of my old lab if you look at the Leapfrog review on Amazon.
AD ASTRA, AUT VIAM INVENIUM AUT FACIUM
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

May 16th, 2018, 1:17 am #8

Since new pages now pop up to the top, I'll start documenting assembling my new 3D printer here.  

I finally got a free hour, so I started to unpack the 3D printer.  The first thing I noticed was how well everything was packed.  Probably better than I would have done, but since this thing had to travel half way around the world, better safe than sorry.  Each bracket (and there are a lot of them)  is individually wrapped in plastic.  groups of them were either bagged, or wrapped in bubble wrap.  Then everything was double boxed.  It's actually getting to be a nuisance having to cut the plastic off of each part.  They thoughtfully included a set of Allen wrenches to help with assembly.  



All of the fasteners came bagged and labeled.  The brackets are all powder-coated.  Some of the screws are in packages of more than 100, yikes.

 Here what I needed for the first step of assembly.   



This was a nice touch.  I hope I don't need it, but if I do, I'm glad it's in there.

I'll keep you posted.
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

May 16th, 2018, 4:48 pm #9

Tossing a bag of extra screws, nuts, and assorted parts is always a nice touch, and shows that the manufacturer is'nt micromanaging that snot out of the partsroom people.

"well, if we ship out _only_ what they need, we'll save an extra 10 cents on parts budget and an extra 5 cents on shipping cost."  and then it costs the customer extra aggravation either sourcing the spare if they need it, or having to wait for the company to drop one of them in the mail or something..
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

May 16th, 2018, 6:04 pm #10

I've used one spare part so far.  One 5mm nut didn't want to thread on.  I tried it from both directions, and then on a different screw, and it was obviously the nut.  I opened the spare parts bag, and found a replacement.  Personally, I think there's too many parts in there, but better too many, than one too few.

The frame is starting to take shape.  It's upside-down in the photo below.



I've found my first "Oops" in the kit.  Some of the extruded pieces that make up the frame have clearance holes so you can stick an Allen wrench through to tighten a bolt.  Generally speaking, if there's a hole in one directions, there's also a hole in the other direction.  But one set didn't have the second set of holes.  A few steps later, I suddenly needed to tighten a bolt, and there wasn't a hole to put the wrench through.  I double and triple checked that I had the correct pieces, and that I was assembling them in the correct way.  Once I was sure I was correct, I sent a note to the manufacturer, and easily drilled them with my drill press.  I've marked the location of one of the missing holes in the photo above, but I needed one for each corner, a total of four.  The bottom (not visible in photo) is structured a little different, and I can see all the holes are there.

I'm just started to get to the mechanical bits now.  
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