4-11-12 - Experience

4-11-12 - Experience

jwhouk
jwhouk

April 11th, 2012, 1:36 pm #1

I actually like this, because for those of us who aren't exactly PB freaks (raises hand ashamedly), it explains what we're seeing.

I know Doc can't play-by-play everyone and everything, but a few notes or comments in the same way Jake's describing Tawny's tactics help understand what we're seeing on the field.
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Solar
Solar

April 12th, 2012, 10:10 am #2

A noob question by another non-paintballer... enemy in range, enemy in sight - wouldn't anything other than actually trying to hit the enemy be somewhat stupid? I mean, does it actually take "experience" to do so?
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Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

April 12th, 2012, 1:35 pm #3

I'm not much of a paintballer, but I know that 'spray and pray' is also a valid tactic if you want to focus on moving quickly. Suppressing a target can be almost as good as hitting it.
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OXX
OXX

April 12th, 2012, 5:58 pm #4

A noob question by another non-paintballer... enemy in range, enemy in sight - wouldn't anything other than actually trying to hit the enemy be somewhat stupid? I mean, does it actually take "experience" to do so?
There is a balance needed between "fast" and "accurate." One can shoot very fast in the general direction of the other end of the field while also being able to focus most keenly on running safely and quickly to a bunker. They are not likely to actually hit an opponent. To take the time to actually aim at a target will take up considerably more cognitive focus, thus slowing down the running and hiding part of the equation.

OXX
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

April 12th, 2012, 8:22 pm #5

A noob question by another non-paintballer... enemy in range, enemy in sight - wouldn't anything other than actually trying to hit the enemy be somewhat stupid? I mean, does it actually take "experience" to do so?
Keep in mind our example is a one-on-one. During the actual tournament, there will be three players on either team, so any one player has to try and pay attention to multiple opponents.

One trick teams will use is called "laning", as in shooting down a lane, or passage between bunkers. This is essentially an "area denial" technique- you're not trying to actually hit another player, you're just trying to prevent those other players from using that "lane" to advance up the field.

If your team can advance further up the field, or at least get one of your players further up the field (your "point man") you tend to have the advantage- not the least of which is, in a center flag scenario, you're closer to the goal.

Also, in more general terms, shooting at a player's bunker, or near/around their bunker, restricts their ability to peek out or lean out and shoot. Again, it's basically 'area denial' fire rather than targeted aim-to-hit shooting.

In our first scenario, both girls ran for cover before shooting- Sandy got to her cover first, and had a second or two to shoot at Pirta while she was still running. Pirta hunkered down and started shooting back at Sandy's bunker, not knowing that Sandy was crawling away from it (and towards the flag) while concealed behind another bunker between them.

In our second scenario, as Jake notes, Sandy's a faster runner than Tawny, but Tawny knows the tricks I outlined above. She only has to watch Sandy (and not, as I said, pay attention to at least one or two other players) and so could focus on shooting directly at Sandy, forcing her to run for cover. In the few seconds Tawny will have while Sandy's behind her bunker, she can keep running and/or pick a more advantageous bunker.

Doc.
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jwhouk
jwhouk

April 13th, 2012, 2:01 am #6

That helps a WHOLE bunch. I sucked big time at Laser Tag (which is what we played way back in the day), but those tactics actually make sense.
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Joni
Joni

April 13th, 2012, 5:38 am #7

Keep in mind our example is a one-on-one. During the actual tournament, there will be three players on either team, so any one player has to try and pay attention to multiple opponents.

One trick teams will use is called "laning", as in shooting down a lane, or passage between bunkers. This is essentially an "area denial" technique- you're not trying to actually hit another player, you're just trying to prevent those other players from using that "lane" to advance up the field.

If your team can advance further up the field, or at least get one of your players further up the field (your "point man") you tend to have the advantage- not the least of which is, in a center flag scenario, you're closer to the goal.

Also, in more general terms, shooting at a player's bunker, or near/around their bunker, restricts their ability to peek out or lean out and shoot. Again, it's basically 'area denial' fire rather than targeted aim-to-hit shooting.

In our first scenario, both girls ran for cover before shooting- Sandy got to her cover first, and had a second or two to shoot at Pirta while she was still running. Pirta hunkered down and started shooting back at Sandy's bunker, not knowing that Sandy was crawling away from it (and towards the flag) while concealed behind another bunker between them.

In our second scenario, as Jake notes, Sandy's a faster runner than Tawny, but Tawny knows the tricks I outlined above. She only has to watch Sandy (and not, as I said, pay attention to at least one or two other players) and so could focus on shooting directly at Sandy, forcing her to run for cover. In the few seconds Tawny will have while Sandy's behind her bunker, she can keep running and/or pick a more advantageous bunker.

Doc.
I haven't been to a torney for about 8 years, but I ran into one of my old team buddys the other day. He was taking up playing again, but apparantly the have changed the rules (at least here in Sweden). 10 bps cap and 3 pod limit in the lower leagues. I wonder what that would do to the tactics I know, but I'm guessing that laning would be a lot less common than when we had unlimited bps and ball count. A lot cheaper to play too, makes me want to dig up my gear again =)
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Eric
Eric

April 13th, 2012, 8:11 am #8

I'm not much of a paintballer, but I know that 'spray and pray' is also a valid tactic if you want to focus on moving quickly. Suppressing a target can be almost as good as hitting it.
Some support weapons are used to reduce enemy movement as much as they are to make KIA bad guys. One of our CATM instructors pointed out that a good machine gun crew can deny large amounts of area to the enemy by understanding and properly using suppressive fire. People tend to avoid the scary gun.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

April 13th, 2012, 12:26 pm #9

I haven't been to a torney for about 8 years, but I ran into one of my old team buddys the other day. He was taking up playing again, but apparantly the have changed the rules (at least here in Sweden). 10 bps cap and 3 pod limit in the lower leagues. I wonder what that would do to the tactics I know, but I'm guessing that laning would be a lot less common than when we had unlimited bps and ball count. A lot cheaper to play too, makes me want to dig up my gear again =)
Every tournament promoter has a different set of rules. Some allow ramping, some don't, some use different time limits or points totals, you name it.

I heard a year or two ago that one of the big-name promoters was trying a limited-paint event specifically to try and attract more teams. A major tourney is rather paint-intensive, and more teams might be able to play if they know they'll only need to buy, say, three cases of paint instead of seven or even ten.

In big events, "laning" was so important that the back players carried extra-capacity harnesses, sometimes carrying up to 12 pods or more- plus, one innovation was to carry two additional pods, taped together, in their hand. This was called the "football" (and carried like one) to give the player several hundred immediately-accessible rounds, so he could just pour paint and stroke the trigger for their "area denial" strategy.

Naturally, that cost a lot of paint, with those backmen carrying- and expected to shoot- an entire case of paint. For every single game. That's about fifty or sixty dollars to play a single five to ten minute game.

Strategy is, of course, far different if the teams are paint-limited. You can still "lane", but only for a few seconds, not over the entire course of the game.

Doc.
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