I hate Facebook

ecgordon
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ecgordon
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8:41 AM - Oct 09, 2011 #1

I'm saying that even though I've never had a Facebook account. I doubt I ever will.



Granted, I'm a crotchety old man who is resistant to change, but here's my beef with Facebook; the internet is a wondrous thing, but it should be a place free of restrictions and roadblocks. But now it seems that nearly every site I visit has linked to Facebook, and certain things can only be done if you also link to your Facebook account. The Science Fiction Book Club occasionally runs contests, but I can't enter because I don't have a Facebook account. Just the other day I wanted to comment on a blog about television series canceled too soon, but I couldn't because I couldn't log into my Facebook account. If this goes on much longer there won't be many sites I'll visit on a regular basis. And how about all the stories of people who have lost their jobs, or marriages that have broken up, all because of something posted on a Facebook page.



You may be saying to yourself that Galen is stupid for not jumping on the bandwagon and creating a Facebook page. I've never done anything simply because everyone else is doing it, in fact it usually would make me less inclined to do so. I never had a MySpace page either, and I don't Twitter or follow celebrities' Twitter feeds. I have no desire to bore anyone else with the mundane details of my life, or if I do I'll just post something here where hardly anyone will see it. Facebook also never interested me, and then after I saw The Social Network I was even more adamant that I would not join that site. Mark Zuckerberg might actually be the devil since he seems bent on controlling everyone.



You may also say I'm just jealous that he created something that made him so much money. Not jealous, just angry that there are people gullible enough to pay someone that much money for something that is so trivial. It's a lot like I feel about professional sports salaries. No one is worth that kind of money for that type of thing. Yeah, I'm a crotchety old man for sure, so while we're at it, "Get off my lawn!"
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tek ni
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tek ni
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3:00 PM - Oct 09, 2011 #2

Well, there's lots I hate about facebook and lots I like about it. I did take awhile to jump on the bandwagon, as I usually do. Of course now it's pretty much indispensable, but sooner or later it will likely be replaced by something else, just like facebook essentially replaced MySpace (which is now mainly a place for musical artists and such). Right now it looks like Google+ is what'll replace facebook, even if there's actually rather little difference between the two, and facebook is still way more popular. (I should mention Felicia Day has pages I follow on both facebook and Google+) Anyway, I do think it sucks that there are sites that require you to log in with facebook. So far I haven't noticed that so much as a requirement, though I have frequently seen it as an option, which is rather convenient as long as that's all it is. (Though it kind of reminds me of things that have been tried before, like MSN about a decade ago.) I still haven't gotten on Twitter, but I always say I'll start an account once I'm famous. And I haven't seen the Social Network yet, though I do have the DVD. Oh, I should mention that the best place for people to hate facebook to congregate is facebook itself. You have no idea the percentage of posts that people make about how much they hate whatever new site layout has been implemented recently. (Which is a phenomenon I've seen on any number of other sites before.)



I do think if a marriage breaks up because of something on facebook, it must have been a pretty damn weak union to begin with. But losing jobs I can see; my managers at my last job once had to sit me down and discuss something I'd posted, though I wasn't actually fired over it. Um, also I agree about sports salaries. Feel the same way about lots of occupations, including just about any kind of celebrity (other than fiction writers, of course ...as well as corporate heads and politicians...
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Eliza DoLots
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Eliza DoLots
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10:16 PM - Oct 09, 2011 #3

Well, I fully understand the sentiment, but surely you see that it is not Facebook's fault that these other websites want to be associated with them? (You could even do it with this board, though I know you wont)



It's an advertising trade off of sorts for them. When you do something on their sites, they will send the news out to your "friends" so they know what you did and will hopefully come do something too.



My about to be 85 year old Mother In Law just bought her first computing device. It's an iPad (and, I'm tremendously jealous). One of the first things my daughter and I did was set her up with a Facebook account simply so she will have a familiar "login" when she goes to something interesting. Were she to have to register and create passwords for every site she found interesting, she'd quickly become overwhelmed.



She will never post a single word about her life on Facebook. She has, however, been checking on my daughter's activities (she made cookies!) and reviewed the photo-gallery a friend put up of her trip to England and France.



You can view it as a "password bank" so that you only need the one log in.



While I doubt you'll take the plunge, considering what you wrote, ec, if you do decide it's worth it, contact me and I'll give you some tips to make sure it doesn't become a problem of any kind for you.
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NotAgain
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NotAgain
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3:56 PM - Oct 10, 2011 #4

I do have an account, but I use it mainly to keep up with relatives and friends.  The recent changes are driving me crazy.
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Monkeypro
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9:03 PM - Oct 10, 2011 #5

Hummm... I know for a fact that Israel's Mossad has agents that are paid to troll Facebook for embarrassing info to use against people for advancement of political agendas. I'm sure they aren't the only ones. These guys operate on the legitimate assumption that sooner or later someone will post drunk or say something that reveals an embarrassing secret. then they copy and paste that into an email with a threat.



Sigh...



There's very little good to say about facebook. It was invented by a narcissist for other narcissists. Basically for people who love to talk about themselves and have others confirm their concept of self and stroke their egos. There might be one appropriate place for it's commercial use: IE bands, celebrities, performers, artists, and sports, -but I think that generally it corrupts the normal development of our children. On facebook, much like youtube, kids develop habits of doing inappropriate or outrageous things to see who can win a competition of "likes" or hits. This more often than not erodes and undermines the behaviors and morals that parents wish to instill in their kids.



I once accidentally used facebook to make a political comment on a discussion board. Problem is it wasn't my account. The site just asked me if I would like to leave a comment. "Sure", I thought, and I began typing away. Frankly... I was pretty brutal in my commentary and analysis of the issue and of comments from others on the site. Then, I hit the "post" button. My post appeared, just as I expected, just as I wrote it. But just above the comment, it said (First Name, Last Name said:) I did a double take. The name wasn't mine. In fact, it was the name of one of my neices, who frequently uses facebook when she visits. When I discovered that I could not edit the comment or take it back, I thought "Oh my God, what have I done?"



I realized my neice had forgotten to log out of her account, and the stupid system had assumed that I was her. To my shame, I secretly poked around on her facebook page, and (again horrified) I found the comment I had made on that board (a place she would never know about) listed as one of her recent comments. Eventually I found a way to delete that comment from her page, then I logged her out.



Lesson:

FACEBOOK IS EVIL.



The good news is that many sites allow you to comment with a Yahoo or a Gmail ID, or some alternate login. Many sites have their own registration, including the BBC and the New York Times. One popular general login that is accepted by many sites is Disqus, -which I use on RCP -Real Clear Politics. Link to Disqus: http://disqus.com/welcome/



Oh, and one other reason I don't use facebook myself, aside from the above reasons, is that some jerk registered my handle at facebook to prevent me from using it. I think he must have been reading my comments at either Haaretz http://www.haaretz.com/ or Mideastweb for Coexistance http://www.mideastweb.org



So while there is a facebook account with a handle I once used, it is not mine and is empty as far as I know.



:-) :-) :-)
~We must be the change we wish to see in the world. -Mahatma Gandhi
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tek ni
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tek ni
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10:27 PM - Oct 10, 2011 #6

I don't think you can really blame facebook for that incident with your niece's account. First of all, that kind of thing has happened to countless people for many years, starting long before facebook was ever conceived. Any time there's any kind of site where you have to log into an account, it's important to make sure the last person who used the computer is logged out, if the computer is used by more than just you. But people forget, it can't be helped, because people are just forgetful. Of course, the incident you describe is a bit different, because it sounds like you weren't using facebook at all, but rather the site you were using gave the option of posting a comment from that site to facebook... which is kind of odd, but I guess I could see that happening. I cannot, however, imagine for one moment that whatever prompt you saw didn't specifically mention facebook, and if you knew you didn't have an account on facebook yourself, that should have been a red flag. Again, people make mistakes. I myself have made countless mistakes over my years on the internet, just like everyone else. But I don't really think there's anything wrong with different sites making it easier to share what you're doing with your friends, as long as they don't make it impossible to avoid sharing such information. And it doesn't sound to me like it was impossible.



I think that with any innovation in life, whether online or off, there is the potential to make life easier, and that often cannot help but come with the potential to make life more complicated. That doesn't mean the innovation should just be rejected to avoid potential complications... that's just throwing away the baby with the damn bathwater, that is. The makers of innovations have to do their best to point out possible problems to the users, and then it's up to the users to recognize those warnings and use the innovation in the manner which it was intended.
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Monkeypro
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11:21 PM - Oct 10, 2011 #7

Tek:

"Any time there's any kind of site where you have to log into an account, it's important to make sure the last person who used the computer is logged out, if the computer is used by more than just you."



Well yea. Perhaps I shouldn't blame facebook for the situation, but I choose to do so anyway. The odd thing is that I had posted at that particular site many times, and still do. Never had a problem before. The difference seems to be in the way that the site perceived and acknowledged my presence.



Obviously, if one wishes for instance to threaten the president, one should wait for an unsuspecting teen to forget to log out of their facebook account. While I didn't actually do that, you can see how the flaw could snowball into a potentially serious problem.



But getting back to my other point, consider what happened to Anthony Weiner. I believe that happened on twitter, but it underlines how a person can be targeted by posers who pretend to be friends or fans and sucker the person into doing something dangerous or stupid, then make him pay for it. In the Weiner case, the cute "friends" of the congressman who sent him pics of themselves and received one back were actually paid activists working for political smear-merchant Andrew Brietbart.



The world was a better place before facebook.



:-) :-) :-)
~We must be the change we wish to see in the world. -Mahatma Gandhi
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Eliza DoLots
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Eliza DoLots
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1:01 AM - Oct 11, 2011 #8

Hey, failure to understand internet cookies is probably generational, so the message really shouldn't be "Facebook is evil" it should be "clear cookies before using someone else's computer".



As someone long experienced in computers, Pro, you should have known that was a possibility. The fact that you screwed up is not the fault of Facebook. (though, I will say that Facebook has the loosest security I've encountered...even Fanfiction.net makes me log in if I've been away for 3 days....)
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Monkeypro
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2:29 AM - Oct 11, 2011 #9

Eliza:

That's just it. IE is set to delete all temporary internet files AND cookies every time the browser is closed. This includes data for favorite links.



-And the browser was closed when I sat down at the computer.



Which leads me to conclude Facebook is the Devil. Honestly, the more the kids touch this machine the worse it gets. I think they click on lots of downloads that might contain damaging or dangerous files, trojans, etc. I do have Norton Antivirus, but still one has to wonder...



:-) :-) :-)
~We must be the change we wish to see in the world. -Mahatma Gandhi
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ecgordon
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ecgordon
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5:55 AM - Oct 11, 2011 #10

I'll admit I exaggerated a bit for effect with my comment, but my opinion still stands. The main thing is that I am sick and tired of hearing about and seeing Facebook on everything. There are plenty of sites, that while offering Facebook interface, do allow you to view content there, but there has been way more than one occurrence of when I could not comment on a blog or news item without a Facebook account. And if you have not seen The Social Network, you should do so just to see what type of scoundrels are involved with that enterprise.
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