Radar No3 Mk2 GL

Radar No3 Mk2 GL

Alan Brock
Alan Brock

August 4th, 2008, 6:41 pm #1

Has anyone any info or experiences with the WW2 No3 Mk2 AA radar trailer (also known as GL3B).
Mounted on a 6 wheel trailer and weighing 9.5 tons, has 2 48" parabolic reflectors on the roof.
Built from 1943 to 45 and used up to the late 50's by the British Army.
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harvey
harvey

August 12th, 2008, 11:46 am #2

Alan (I think we have communicated before)
I cant offer you much except..
I have a pdf file I gathered somewhere which has a para or two on the Canadian use and export of the GL3C

REPORT NO. 73
HISTORICAL SECTION (G.S.)
ARMY HEADQUARTERS
14 Feb 55
A SURVEY OF ARMY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 1939-45

If this interests you
email me at
harvey at edwards dot net
and I will send it to you

and
my only notes say...
GL3
Two CV22 thyratrons were used to generate a 40A/25kV 1µs pulse at 400pps for the GL3 S-band radar.

and finally I once received from...
Fred J. Heath
At Royal Canadian Air Force, where I became the resident engineer at Research Enterprises in Toronto, where the Canadian government was manufacturing radar equipment basically to the British design: initially, the ASV equipment and also gunlaying equipment equipment that used two separate antennas, one for transmitting and one for receiving. They had operators who maintained the direction: one operator for vertical and the other for horizontal direction. It gave, I would imagine, about the same sort of performance as they had with the 584. This was the GL3-C I think they called it. And they said that without radar it took about 2,000 shells to bring an enemy plane down; with radar they could do it with about eight or ten. [Chuckling] They built about 660, I think, of those GL3-Cs and shipped them over to Britain and, I guess, to the continent.

sorry not much help
regards
harv
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Walter
Walter

December 29th, 2009, 12:53 pm #3

Has anyone any info or experiences with the WW2 No3 Mk2 AA radar trailer (also known as GL3B).
Mounted on a 6 wheel trailer and weighing 9.5 tons, has 2 48" parabolic reflectors on the roof.
Built from 1943 to 45 and used up to the late 50's by the British Army.
I worked on this type about 1951 - 1953 at a R.E.M.E. AA workshop, not far from Edinburgh. Duties included repairing and adjusting and inspections both at base and at an AA Ordnance depot in Falkirk.

I can't remember much about them now except that they were, by then, very difficult to keep up to scratch.

By this time some had been sold off as surplus and a few converted to mobile fish and chip units.
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Brian Mendes
Brian Mendes

April 14th, 2010, 5:16 am #4

Alan (I think we have communicated before)
I cant offer you much except..
I have a pdf file I gathered somewhere which has a para or two on the Canadian use and export of the GL3C

REPORT NO. 73
HISTORICAL SECTION (G.S.)
ARMY HEADQUARTERS
14 Feb 55
A SURVEY OF ARMY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 1939-45

If this interests you
email me at
harvey at edwards dot net
and I will send it to you

and
my only notes say...
GL3
Two CV22 thyratrons were used to generate a 40A/25kV 1µs pulse at 400pps for the GL3 S-band radar.

and finally I once received from...
Fred J. Heath
At Royal Canadian Air Force, where I became the resident engineer at Research Enterprises in Toronto, where the Canadian government was manufacturing radar equipment basically to the British design: initially, the ASV equipment and also gunlaying equipment equipment that used two separate antennas, one for transmitting and one for receiving. They had operators who maintained the direction: one operator for vertical and the other for horizontal direction. It gave, I would imagine, about the same sort of performance as they had with the 584. This was the GL3-C I think they called it. And they said that without radar it took about 2,000 shells to bring an enemy plane down; with radar they could do it with about eight or ten. [Chuckling] They built about 660, I think, of those GL3-Cs and shipped them over to Britain and, I guess, to the continent.

sorry not much help
regards
harv
Just became aware of this website which looks like a good platform to broadcast my concerns over the situation surrounding the only surviving GL III (c) AA Gunlaying Radar which still has many of the internal electronics still in place.The development and manufacture of the GL III(c) was a major achievement in Canada's war effort.It was the first centimetric wavelength mobile AA radar to go into mass production in WW II and was the most impressive project undertaken by the Radio Branch of the National Research Council. 667 of these radars were (exclusively) manufactured by Research Enterprises Ltd 1942 -45 and many were deployed on UK AA gunsites before the British GL III B and the US SCR 584 became available.

It was only discovered in the summer of 2006 that an APF cabin ( AA radar No 3 Mk 1 ) and a ZPI cabin (AA radar No 4 Mk 1 ) were parked in the storage yard of the RCA Museum in Shilo, Manitoba and that the museum staff had no idea of their historic significance. It took two years to gain access to the cabin interior of the APF unit, where most of the racks were still in place ( vacuum tubes, CRT's and several meters were missing. but the interior was as manufactured )

Efforts to have even the minumum of care and stopgap preservation measures implemented have fallen on deaf ears. If this situation is to remedied, it will require evidence that there is concern from WW II radar enthusiasts. I and a few very elderly army radar veterans would like to hear from you if this historic artifact is to be saved from further deterioration. Digital images are available... E-mail me at Briwilmen@rogers.com
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