Wire Train Spools

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Wire Train Spools

nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 1st, 2017, 2:12 pm #1

Anyone know this excellent modeler and how he made the wire spools?
Thanks
IMG_3085.JPG
IMG_3086.JPG
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

October 1st, 2017, 7:43 pm #2

The scale spools may have been scratch-built using sheet styrene, but there are some scale offerings out there.

http://www.protoloads.com/shop/atlas-ho ... ity-cable/

http://www.hobbylinc.com/herpa-wooden-c ... upply-5438
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 1st, 2017, 9:24 pm #3

What size spools would have been seen at the Cos Cob power plant for plant distribution wire?  The scale spools are available in 4' diameter, 7' and larger.  The wire train spools appear to be the 4' version.

Thanks,

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

October 1st, 2017, 10:29 pm #4

The spool size is determined by the product wrapped on the spool.  Solid copper or steel wire can be quite heavy, and unless you're going hog-wild stringing up miles and miles of new wire you're going to want something that can be safely managed.  Four-foot spools for repair work would be more than adequate.

Larger spools would be used for communication lines and such, with multiple wires within the cable casing.  Per cubic foot, these weigh less than steel or copper.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 2nd, 2017, 12:07 am #5

Statkowski wrote: The spool size is determined by the product wrapped on the spool.  Solid copper or steel wire can be quite heavy, and unless you're going hog-wild stringing up miles and miles of new wire you're going to want something that can be safely managed.  Four-foot spools for repair work would be more than adequate.

Larger spools would be used for communication lines and such, with multiple wires within the cable casing.  Per cubic foot, these weigh less than steel or copper.
Thanks
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 2nd, 2017, 9:17 am #6

Statkowski wrote: The spool size is determined by the product wrapped on the spool.  Solid copper or steel wire can be quite heavy, and unless you're going hog-wild stringing up miles and miles of new wire you're going to want something that can be safely managed.  Four-foot spools for repair work would be more than adequate.

Larger spools would be used for communication lines and such, with multiple wires within the cable casing.  Per cubic foot, these weigh less than steel or copper.
Do you think the wire spools in this image are 7' diamter spools or 4' diamter spools?  They are at least the height of the chain link security fencing.
Cos Cob Wire Spools.jpg Thanks,

Ed
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

October 2nd, 2017, 10:27 am #7

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). I think those are 7 foot diameter spools and here is why. I'm using the distances between the line posts on the westside chainlink fencing as a probable known distance on about the same angular plane as the spools. While the maximum distance between the line posts is ten feet, the actual distances will vary with each fencing installation. Since the number of line posts is determined after the terminal posts are set by measuring the distance between the terminal posts and dividing it into ten foot segments, rounding down any remainder. There are industry standards charts breaking the distance between the terminal posts into foot increments stating the line post distances in various increments, with the longer distances from nine foot through ten foot. There are 14 line posts making 15 sections in the westside leg of the fence, and since most of the charts showing 9'3" as the shortest distance on extremely long runs, I'm guesstimating that line posts are set between 9'3" and 10" feet apart. When I measure the diameter of the various spools and compare the measurements with the distance between the line posts on the westside leg of the chainlink fence on the similar plane, the remaining gap of fencing is roughly between 20% and 25% of the distance. Since the diameter of the spools are taking up 75% to 80% of the distance between the line posts, I think those are 7 foot spools. Four foot spools would take up 40% to 44% of the distance between the line posts. Anyone with a better way to measure using photo interpertation variables of distance, angles, and actual or probable known measurements of objects, please help out one way or the other. I'm using only two known spool diameters, and if the power industry and the New Haven Railroad used other size spools I can be off on my spool diameter.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 2nd, 2017, 11:21 am #8

Thanks Richard, for the observations,

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

October 2nd, 2017, 1:44 pm #9

Based on the width to height ratio on the spools, compared to the first photographs posted, they look like seven-foot spools.  I didn't bother with measuring fenceposts or other stuff.  We dealt with similar things containing multi-strand signal cables when I was stationed at the Nevada Test Site (lots of long-distance electronic monitoring when detonating a subterranean thermonuclear blast).
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 2nd, 2017, 2:02 pm #10

Thanks Henry,

You have quite the interesting history of service!

Ed
Last edited by nhhe52 on October 3rd, 2017, 11:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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