Turntables

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 31st, 2018, 6:21 pm #11

NYNH&H Turntable, Woodlawn-Stamford, H. F. Brown, C-201.jpg Here's a picture of East Port Chester's turntable.
Last edited by Statkowski on June 1st, 2018, 8:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 31st, 2018, 10:16 pm #12

Thanks Henry:

That is very interesting.  I’ve never seen and image of an electrified overhead wire turntable.  I didn’t know such every was used.   Learn something new with every visit to the Discussion Board.

Ed
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 31st, 2018, 10:40 pm #13

As previously stated, the EP-1s didn't need turning, but did need to be stuck out of the way, and the turntable tracks were available.

I'm sure they dropped their pans before getting turned to avoid snagging anything.
Quote
Like
Share

NH746EJO
Member
Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

June 1st, 2018, 9:33 am #14

Turntables With Electric Wires

Thanks for the "electrified" turntable photo, Henry. I had never seen one on the NYNH&H.  They seem to have been uncommon in the USA since most electrics were serviced in rectangular buildings without turntables.  However, I have seen a number of them in use in Europe.  I suspect many turntables with wires date to the steam era and were retained when electrification arrived.
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

June 1st, 2018, 10:04 am #15

Yes, the turntable and its available storage tracks date from steam days.  Once enough MUTs were available, the turntable and the need for locomotive storage tracks became redundant.
Quote
Like
Share

jkasey
Member
jkasey
Member
Joined: July 6th, 2017, 10:31 am

June 1st, 2018, 7:08 pm #16

Henry,
The picture above should be captioned as being at East Port Chester's, not East Portchester's.

John
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

June 1st, 2018, 8:06 pm #17

Yes and no.  In assorted entries spanning the years, the New Haven has used both "Port Chester" or "Portchester", and "East Port Chester" and "East Portchester".  The passenger yard has also been called "Byram Yard" to differentiate it from the "Port Chester Yard" on the New York side of the Byram River.  The interlocking station, S.S. 27, was listed as East Port Chester.

Here's the ICC Valuation Map of the whole area on both sides of the border:  http://collections.ctdigitalarchive.org ... :860065560
Quote
Like
Share

Dick Otto
Member
Joined: September 8th, 2004, 6:14 am

June 1st, 2018, 9:09 pm #18

A most interesting and unusual photo.  The irony of this arrangement is whereas it's devised to accommodate electrically powered locos, the turntable itself is a good ol' Armstrong!
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

June 1st, 2018, 10:33 pm #19

The electrics merely replaced steam, necessitating the need for the overhead.  If you look at the valuation map, you'll note there were stub tracks coming off of the turntable, eight of them, each 96 feet long, long enough, I suppose, to squeeze in two EP-1s per track, not that they needed to store sixteen EP-1s at any given time.

Here's a picture of the yard filled with passenger cars.  Not much room to store engines, too. East Port Chester Byram Yard.png
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

June 2nd, 2018, 10:09 am #20

Henry:

Where are you finding these great period images?

Ed
Quote
Like
Share