The Rebuilt by Alco FAs FBs and the correct color of the red orange

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The Rebuilt by Alco FAs FBs and the correct color of the red orange

Ron High
Member
Joined: 06 Jun 2003, 20:08

04 Sep 2017, 20:51 #1

Soon I am going to start a project to do a couple of sets of the Alco rebuilds. I am going to use the E-R Models Frateschi FA1 and the Walthers / Train Miniature FB1 and Proto FB2 shells with Hobbytown Drives. I have long studied these engines have lots of photos and Shoreliners for reference. But my big question is what shade of Red Orange paint . Most importantly what color of commercially available paint would be the best representation of the Red Orange.
A long time ago 40+ years I did a set of TM FAs with Hobbytown drives .I used the long ago Floquil formula  from the old data sheet. It looked OK but these days I think I can do better. Any thoughts or suggestions would welcome.
Ron High

PS that old Hobbytown set still runs like a well tuned set of engines
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

05 Sep 2017, 02:34 #2

Mr. Ron. In Shoreliner, vol 14, iss 4, in Mr. Ken Patton's article titled "NH the 400's Part 2," on page 30 he wrote, "Units [FA-1] 0401, 0418, 0426, 0428, [FB-1] 0456, 0458, 0462, and [FB-2] 467 returned with 1600 hp and nose MU as their most conspicuous features. These 1959 rebuilds also had the most refined version of Alpert paint scheme, having scotchlite lettering, Socony red headlight casing and a larger "NH" emblem on the nose." Socony red as you know was an old term for the red-orange paint used by the New Haven. I would go to the NHRHTA's New Haven Railroad Color Guide and use the second paint chip page for red-orange since that was the color used in 1959. I haven't compared Rapido Proto-Paint 330054 New Haven Red-Orange, Badger 16-182 New Haven Red-Orange, or Badger 16-183 New Haven Socony Red to see which matches which paint chip best yet. I have had very good results with both Rapido Proto-Paint and Badger Railroad Colors Paint. I hope this helps.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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Ron High
Member
Joined: 06 Jun 2003, 20:08

05 Sep 2017, 18:47 #3

Thank you Richard, I do have the NH Color Guide as well as all the Shoreliners including the Ken Patton 2 part article. I guess my biggest question is if anyone has thoughts on which available paint works best to represent this color. If I have to I will try  some of each of the manufacturers paint.
Ron High
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Statkowski
Member
Joined: 05 Mar 2003, 09:39

05 Sep 2017, 20:09 #4

It may all boil down to whatever looks best, to you.  We all see colors differently.  Of course, factory fresh and road-grime-weathered can also be a factor.

Red, red-orange, orange and yellow all go down best on top of a grey primer.

Another determining factor in "what's best?" is the light source.  Bright sunlight vs. incandescent bulbs vs. fluorescent lights vs. newer LED lights vs. whatever-they're-called-vegetable-growing fluorescent lights.  Each will create a different variation of the same original color.
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James Fellows
Member
Joined: 15 Nov 2003, 03:30

07 Sep 2017, 13:24 #5

I find that the Badger Red/Orange is an excellent match to the Micro Scale lettering.  This is not a big deal on the Albert scheme locomotives, but it is for paining McGinnis locomotives.  I also use it for my Alpert paint jobs as well.

Jim Fellows
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NHJJ4
Member
Joined: 18 Aug 2003, 09:18

10 Sep 2017, 19:22 #6

 When it comes to primer before paint I always use a silver it covers well, is thin, hides less detail due to being thin and less paint means better detail when done. I do this on any light color Yellow, white even red's
 Jim
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jkasey
Member
Joined: 06 Jul 2017, 14:31

10 Sep 2017, 19:57 #7

Gentlemen,

Try using a surface primer made by Tamiya. It  comes spray cans & in three shades:

#87042-gray
#87042-light gray
#87044-white

I have used it successfully on both plastic & brass with excellent results! Being in a spray can you have to adjust the distance from the model but it levels off very well, even if you think you put it on too heavy. It can be obtained at hobby shops that deal with military models & aircraft & Hobby Lobby.

John Kasey
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jkasey
Member
Joined: 06 Jul 2017, 14:31

10 Sep 2017, 19:57 #8

Gentlemen,

Try using a surface primer made by Tamiya. It  comes spray cans & in three shades:

#87042-gray
#87042-light gray
#87044-white

I have used it successfully on both plastic & brass with excellent results! Being in a spray can you have to adjust the distance from the model but it levels off very well, even if you think you put it on too heavy. It can be obtained at hobby shops that deal with military models & aircraft & Hobby Lobby.

John Kasey
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

10 Sep 2017, 20:41 #9

Mr. Kasey. You forgot about Ms. Kathy Millatt's J-2 (Model Railroader, vol. 78, iss. 3, pages 58-62) and her layout, as well as other I don't recall at this time. Did you just assume they already were aware and using this product, and just wanted to let the remaining type of modelers know, or just being too polite and do what I commonly do. I miss the ball when I drop and try and kick it. 🤔 
I have used the Tamiya lines of paints on the radio controlled cars for painting the body shells from the inside out. (The masking and layering is just the opposite of how we do it on the model trains.) It bonds so well that even after major impacts that bend and dent the shell, the paint doesn't come off the body shell. At least I have never seen it. Since Fast Freight Hobbies down here also does the radio controlled cars I can find it easily. I imagine it should work as well on the resin and other polymer castings.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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jkasey
Member
Joined: 06 Jul 2017, 14:31

10 Sep 2017, 23:36 #10

rsullivan wrote: Mr. Kasey. You forgot about Ms. Kathy Millatt's J-2 (Model Railroader, vol. 78, iss. 3, pages 58-62) and her layout, as well as other I don't recall at this time. Did you just assume they already were aware and using this product, and just wanted to let the remaining type of modelers know, or just being too polite and do what I commonly do. I miss the ball when I drop and try and kick it. 🤔 
I have used the Tamiya lines of paints on the radio controlled cars for painting the body shells from the inside out. (The masking and layering is just the opposite of how we do it on the model trains.) It bonds so well that even after major impacts that bend and dent the shell, the paint doesn't come off the body shell. At least I have never seen it. Since Fast Freight Hobbies down here also does the radio controlled cars I can find it easily. I imagine it should work as well on the resin and other polymer castings.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Richard,
Just what does Kathy Millatt's article have to do with the use of Tamiya primer? I assumed nothing about anything. Perhaps they weren't aware of Tamiya products & I was just telling folks about my use of that particular product and how I liked it!
John
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