Scratchbuilding Semaphores for HO scale layout

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
haksawjoes
Member
Joined: 02 Jan 2006, 22:32

29 Sep 2016, 16:24 #11

Thanks Ed, I have alot to learn!
Joe
Reply

Statkowski
Member
Joined: 05 Mar 2003, 09:39

29 Sep 2016, 16:48 #12

No apologies necessary.  It's a beautiful model, worthy of three pictures.
Back to the OP, a lower-quadrant distant signal would be full size, with a yellow blade and fishtail end.  Two color aspects would be available - green and yellow.  The blade would face to the right of the tracks (i.e., away from the tracks).  I suspect it would have been electrically operated - the default position would be horizontal (yellow aspect) indicating Approach next signal prepared to stop.  It could not show Clear (green aspect, blade 60 degrees down) unless the home signal it protected was actually set to Clear.
Not all signals on the New Haven were converted to left hand, upper quadrant operations, just mostly the more heavily traveled routes with automatic signals, and even not then.  I remember seeing a photograph once, possibly Attleboro, Mass. where one line crossed the Main Line.  The Main Line, of course, had left hand facing signals, but the single track line crossing (or joining?) had a right hand facing signal.  I think the Maybrook Line retained the older signals all the way up until its conversion to CTC with color searchlight signals.
As with many railroads, bits and pieces of such occasionally retained whatever it was they had when something was merged (or leased) into the parent company.  With the New Haven, they started out with the then standard two aspect, right hand, lower quadrant (2ARHLQ) signals but then had to upgrade to three aspect signals to improve speed and protection, and to left-hand facing semaphores due to catenary clearances.  And, since the heavy-duty part of the railroad (i.e., anything west of New Haven going into New York City) became three aspect, left hand, upper quadrant (3ALHUQ) semaphores, it only made sense to bring the rest of the system up to the heavy duty standards.  The New Haven's operation over the New York Connecting Railroad dictated that its signals be the same as the New Haven's.  The New York, Westchester & Boston Railway, however, never did convert from right to left (so that even though the rest of the Harlem River Branch changed over circa 1927, the two NYW&B tracks retained 2ARHLQ semaphores while the other four tracks running parallel had 3ALHUQ semaphores.
Reply

mredden
Member
Joined: 21 Aug 2003, 08:48

30 Sep 2016, 01:26 #13

A couple of years ago I contacted Michael Watnoski of Free State Systems about truck wipers for lighting Branchline passenger cars.  I never ordered anything, but the email address I used was freestatesystems1 comcast.net.  He had a number of detail parts and electronic items for sale.
Mike Redden
Reply

nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

04 Oct 2016, 18:48 #14

Image
Last edited by nhhe52 on 08 Nov 2017, 04:49, edited 2 times in total.
Reply

nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

07 Nov 2017, 21:53 #15

Ron High wrote: Rob the biggest issue is a lot ,but not all semaphores had arms that pointed to the left towards the track. It was said that it related to the practice in electrified territory. Now I made the mistake of stating that all NH signals were that way .Much to my surprise  that was not the case.MR had a series of articles back in the 1960s? about building semaphores. At some point back then Calscale made all the parts in lost wax castings.. I don't think you found them listed in their catalog but if you wrote them you could arrange to purchase the parts. In the 1970s I was able to do this and I did purchase parts.The only issue is the semaphore arms are for the more standard right hand configuration. Bowser has owned Calscale for a number of years but I don't know about the semaphore parts,Tomar  makes some nice semaphore signals and sells parts but again they are the right hand layout.
https://tomarindustries.com/signals.htm
https://tomarindustries.com/sigparts.htm
Ron High
you can see the left facing toward the track in some of these Tad Arnold photos
http://www.nerailroadphotos.com/TadArno ... /i-7NWwj6B
Are there available documents that illustrate all the NH semaphore positions and describe what instructions are given by the positions and lights?

NH RR semaphore images I've found show short round end semaphore arms and short and long pointed end semaphore arms.  Why and where were the different shapes and sizes used?

Also, any scale drawings of the NH semaphores?  I have a few Medel Memories semaphore kits but may have to scratch build more in the future.  Anyway and foremost, I have no knowledge of what the positions and lights mean and would like to educate myself.

Thanks,

Ed
Reply

rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

08 Nov 2017, 00:16 #16

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). Here are some pages from the New Haven RR's 1925 rule book that show the diffent semaphore signaling devices, some search light devices, and switchstand devices.
New Haven RR Rules 1925 pic 4.jpg
New Haven RR 1899 Rule Book Signals
New Haven RR 1899 Rule Book Signals
New Haven RR Rules 1925 pic 3.jpg
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals


New Haven RR Rules 1925 pic 2.jpg
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals

New Haven RR Rules 1925 pic 1.jpg
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals
New Haven RR 1925 Rule Book Signals

American Railroad Assoc Semaphore Blade Specifications pic 1.jpg
American Railroad Association Semaphore Blade Standards
American Railroad Association Semaphore Blade Standards
Hope these help.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Reply

rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

08 Nov 2017, 00:21 #17

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). Here is a picture of a more modern dwarf signal with a semaphore.
NH RR Dwarf Signal pic 1.jpg
New Haven RR Dwarf Signal With Semaphore Blade.
New Haven RR Dwarf Signal With Semaphore Blade.

When the semaphore is angled down at 60 degrees, the yellow lens should show. I know the 1899 Rule Book shows a green light for the dwarf signal to proceed, however the lens looks yellow in the picture, and on the short manual switchstands with a kerosene lantern, they lenses were red and yellow. That is why I said yellow lens.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Last edited by rsullivan on 08 Nov 2017, 00:34, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

08 Nov 2017, 00:30 #18

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). There was an article in a Shoreliner that describe each blades color and shape by its use, location, and meaning. I can't find it in the Shoreliner index. So, I'll have to go through them until I find it, then I'll let you know which one it is. If I remember correctly, the pointed tip red with white stripe blade was a warning of an approaching signal was ahead. The next signal would have a red with white stripe blade with a flat end demanding absolute stop, such as at a draw bridge. I don't recall what the red with white stripe rounded end blade meant. This is from memory, and I might have the color and tips wrong (but I hope not). 
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Reply

nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

08 Nov 2017, 03:37 #19

rsullivan wrote: Mr. Ed(nhhe52). There was an article in a Shoreliner that describe each blades color and shape by its use, location, and meaning. I can't find it in the Shoreliner index. So, I'll have to go through them until I find it, then I'll let you know which one it is. If I remember correctly, the pointed tip red with white stripe blade was a warning of an approaching signal was ahead. The next signal would have a red with white stripe blade with a flat end demanding absolute stop, such as at a draw bridge. I don't recall what the red with white stripe rounded end blade meant. This is from memory, and I might have the color and tips wrong (but I hope not). 
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Great info in your three posts, Richard:

Just what is was looking for.

Thank you,

Ed
Reply

rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

08 Nov 2017, 04:45 #20

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). I recalled wrong. I read New Haven Railroad 1925 Rule Book and here are the correct meanings. The red blade with white stripe and round end is an interlocking signal. The red blade with white stripe and pointed end is an automatic block signal. The red blade with white stripe and squared end is a train order, manual block, controlled block, or a drawbridge signal. A distant signal is the forked-end yellow with black chevron stripe blade. These are described on pages 88 and 89 of that book. I doubt they changed thoughout the years.
New Haven Railroad Rule Book 1925 pic 8.jpg
New Haven Railroad 1925 Rule Book pages 88 and 89. Pages describe the types of signals.
New Haven Railroad 1925 Rule Book pages 88 and 89. Pages describe the types of signals.


I also found a nice website that explains a lot about semaphore signals and devices at http://www.railroadsignals.us/signals/s ... L_DRAWINGS_. The picture at the top appears to be of two upper quadrant short blade automatic block signals positioned as clear to proceed attached to a catenary bridge for eastbound trains on the Harlem Branch it appear at Oak Point Yard. It has a link to the 1930 US&G Catalog of Mechanical Drawings.
Hope the corrections about the semaphore blades reached you before they were permanently ingrained in your memory.
Still haven't found the Shoreliner issue yet.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967 
Reply