Route 128 Industrial Park

nhtwo
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nhtwo
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Joined: January 23rd, 2006, 5:40 am

December 10th, 2007, 10:50 am #1

Was this place served by the New Haven or was it put into operation by the PC?
Bill
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

December 10th, 2007, 5:00 pm #2

I believe this was put into service during the 1950's by
the New Haven Railroad. Not positive about it though.
Noel Weaver
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Bill Reidy
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Joined: June 1st, 2003, 3:22 am

December 10th, 2007, 5:36 pm #3

Marc Frattasio covered this subject in his article on Route 128 Station in Shoreliner Volume 28 Issue 4.
Bill
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AADC3Deadhead
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Joined: May 4th, 2007, 2:27 pm

December 10th, 2007, 10:16 pm #4

I have an advertising folder published by the New Haven in the early 1950's offering companies nice incentives to "relocate" to the Route 128/University Ave. Industrial Park.
See what's in store for a good portion of the Industrial Park by following the link below. Basically, they are converting it into a small city.
www.wscommunityonline.com...rview.html

Brian
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NHRHTA1
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Joined: April 12th, 2003, 5:17 am

December 10th, 2007, 11:09 pm #5

AAC please fill out your profile Thank you.
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Joined: February 12th, 2006, 10:01 pm

December 11th, 2007, 3:48 am #6

Vague memories have it "springing up and mushrooming" around 1965 or 1966, and being switched by NH RS-1s.
This is not to say that it wasn't there during the '50s, but definately was in "RAPID DEVELOPMENT" around 1965/1966.
As I recall, it continued to grow in the PC and CR eras but was definately originated in the NH era.
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MFrattasio
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Joined: December 16th, 2005, 11:52 pm

December 11th, 2007, 9:35 am #7

As stated in a previous posting, the history of Route 128 Station was covered pretty thoroughly in an article that I wrote a few years ago for the Shoreliner magazine. I believe that this issue is still available from the NHRHTA.
The New Haven Railroad bought a substantial amount of land in the vicinity of Route 128 station in 1954 for the express purpose of increasing the size of the station parking lot and building a railroad-served industrial park. The parking lot expansion actually took place in 1955. However, the plan to build an industrial park was shelved after the railroad's financial position deteriorated. During the mid 1960s, the New Haven Railroad sold the land that it owned in the Route 128 Station area to commercial real estate developer Cabot, Cabot, and Forbes. As part of this arrangement, the developer took over the railroad's 1955 station site and built a new brick station building closer to the Route 128 highway (which put Route 128 Station back to where it had originally been in 1953).
The first industrial development in the Westwood Industrial Park was General Motors, and this was established by Cabot, Cabot, and Forbes during the 1965/1966 timeframe. Other firms followed. So, the correct answer is that the concept for the Westwood Industrial Park was something that the New Haven Railroad originated during the mid 1950s but the actual execution did not take place until the mid 1960s and was actually done outside the railroad.
Marc J. Frattasio
Author:
The New Haven Railroad in the McGinnis Era
Dining on the Shore Line Route
The Minutemen of VP-92: The Story of New England's Naval Air Reserve Patrol Squadron
www.gis.net/~fm
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AADC3Deadhead
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Joined: May 4th, 2007, 2:27 pm

December 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm #8

I know everyone who studies the NY NH & H is quite aware of the fact that the New Haven had a wacked out proposal to "dead end" it's Shore Line passenger service at Route 128 Station and have passengers make a connection with a proposed "extension" of the MBTA orange line service from Forest Hills.
I believe this was tied in with the scheme to run I-95 into Boston via what is now known as the Southwest Corridor portion of the NE Corridor between Dedham/Readville/Hyde Park and Back Bay.
About 10 years ago, a good friend of mine who worked in the Engineering Dept. for the MBTA told me the "T" was cleaning house and had hundreds of old blue prints/row charts and other surveys of the former NY NH and H territory that the State of Mass. began to purchase or inherit from the NH and PC.
I grabbed a few neat charts, some dating back to the Old Colony and B&P era that had a wealth of interesting engineering and right of way/structure information, much of which had been pretty much forgotten about in the 20th Century due to many factors, including of course urban renewal, abandonments, etc.
One of the most interesting (to me at least) items my friend Paul had were the plans and engineering proposals for the Route 128 "terminal" scheme.
I was hoping he would have offered me that particular blue print but alas, it didn't happen. I did get a good look at it and I remember seeing several "stub end" tracks at the "proposed" 128 terminal, one track for the MBTA orange line extension connection to Forest Hills, and the rest of the former railroad right of way occupied by I-95, running parallel with the Orange line extension.
Thankfully, this birdbrain proposal was never taken too seriously and our main line railroad into Boston was saved, but seeing what could have become of the Southwest Corridor, had it not been for city and urban planners with a realistic sense of foresight, is indeed quite interesting if not a bit bizzare as well.
Brian
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MFrattasio
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Joined: December 16th, 2005, 11:52 pm

December 13th, 2007, 9:30 am #9

As documented in the article that I wrote for the Shoreliner, the New Haven had actually considered opening a parking lot station at Forest Hills around 1940. Studies were actually conducted by the railroad's passenger traffic department to record the average driving time from various points around the city of Boston to Forest Hills. The main reason a parking lot station wasn't built at Forest Hills at that time was because there wasn't enough buildable land available in the area to build a large parking lot.
There were actually two different proposals to terminate the New Haven Railroad's intercity passenger service at Route 128 station. Both plans assumed that the New Haven Railroad's local passenger service would eventually be taken over by some kind of public authority (i.e the MTA or MBTA).
The first plan, which came about during the 1954/1955 timeframe, proposed to terminate intercity passenger service at Route 128 and a similar parking lot station to be built on the outskirts of New York City at New Rochelle and have passengers either drive into the city centers using rental cars that would be obtained at the stations or connect with local trains. The principal intent of this proposal was to eliminate the need to maintain the huge and expensive (in terms of taxes and other expenses) passenger terminals in Boston and New York City. It was thought that the intercity passenger service would be operated using the new Talgo-type trains. These were to be double-ended and integral, and would thus not require turning or breaking up at the end of runs. The thought was that these trains would pull up to the bumping posts at Route 128 and New Rochelle and then head right back out again.
The second plan came about during the mid to late 1960s and was an offshoot of the ill-fated "Southwest Corridor" highway plan. The Southwest Corridor highway would have followed the alignment of the New Haven Railroad's Boston & Providence main line from the center of Boston to Route 128. In fact, you can still see the unused Southwest Corridor connector at the intersection of Route 128 and I-95 today. The plan was to extend the MTA Washington Street Elevated/MBTA Orange Line along the center or side of Southwest Corridor roadway to Route 128 station. As was the case with the McGinnis administration's plans, intercity passenger service would have terminated at Route 128 station. Passengers wishing to continue on into the center of the city would connect with the rapid transit service. The purpose of this proposal was two-fold, 1) to free up the railroad's right of way for the highway and 2) to allow the BRA to use the land around South Station for other purposes. The only reason this plan did not happen is that local community pressure forced an end to the Southwest Corridor. Remember all the "Stop I-95" signs posted in Hyde Park, Forest Hills, Roxbury, etc.?
Marc J. Frattasio
Author:
The New Haven Railroad in the McGinnis Era
Dining on the Shore Line Route
The Minutemen of VP-92: The Story of New England's Naval Air Reserve Patrol Squadron
www.gis.net/~fm
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