Railroads and artists

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

March 1st, 2018, 9:21 pm #31

Richard Abramson wrote: I find it amazing how some artists just do not do their homework. Brother Henry is absolutely correct about those ridiculous PRR signals; not to mention the Jet's location. The catenary bridge however, is correct. There was an automatic (semaphore) "NY 3.73" located on the Long Island side of Big Hell Gate on trk-3. Opposite that on trk-4 was "NY 3.74". I, and many others who worked for the RR can attest to the fact; not to mention photos, that there were never PRR signals on the NY Connecting until you got to the eastern limits of Harold in NH days or even under PC. It was Amtrak that installed position light signals at "GATE" (Bowery Bay) and other locations on the branch.
Another example of incorrect art is the Howard Fogg painting of the Freedom Train with PAs in 1948 crossing the PRR's Potomac River bridge. . .and no catenary!
Not to mention it’s only shows three tracks where there would have been four and the Jets is out of scale. That said, I give the NH enthusiast the utmost accolades for the expression the painting portrays.  We have have photo evidence if we are looking for the technical accuracy.

Ed
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jfloehr
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jfloehr
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Joined: August 5th, 2010, 6:32 pm

March 4th, 2018, 7:40 am #32

adding Rockwell's "Breaking Home Ties"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breaking_ ... ckwell.jpg
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joemato
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Joined: September 9th, 2003, 1:57 pm

March 4th, 2018, 8:39 am #33

TomCurtin wrote: My wife and I have been extremely fond of Norman Rockwell works for many years; and in this regard it recently occurred to me that it seems a bit strange that Rockwell --- whose home and studio in Stockbridge MA was literally just a few minutes' walk from the Berkshire line and Stockbridge's very photogenic New Haven station --- never painted anything there.  In fact, now that I think about it, I am not aware that Norman ever painted any rail subjects at all.

That indifference hasn't been historically or artists in general. The great French impressionist Claude Monet --- arguably the greatest, and certainly far and away the most prolific impressionist --- not only painted trains but once commented on what an inspiring subject they are!
Trainman Charlie Bardo used to see him ride the train to NYC during WW2.  NR didn't speak to people.
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Dave
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Dave
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Joined: June 11th, 2008, 9:34 am

March 4th, 2018, 10:39 am #34

rsullivan wrote: Mr. Tom. I went to the Totally History site and viewed all of Norman Rockwell's paintings at: http://totallyhistory.com/norman-rockwell-paintings/. There was one railroad theme painting he titled "Boy in Dining Car" that he painted in 1947. Here is the painting from that site.boy-in-a-dining-car-1947-Norman-Rockwell-small.jpg
Looking at all of his painting from February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978, it seems he didn't do any actual buildings, just subjects that included elements of buildings.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Rockwell's son Peter was the model for the boy in the painting.
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rivermanvt
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Joined: June 15th, 2014, 10:26 am

March 12th, 2018, 5:55 am #35

TomCurtin wrote:
Bill Reidy wrote: Edward Hopper (perhaps best known for his painting "Nighthawks") spent about 40 summers in Truro on the outer Cape.  During this time, he painted a number of images that featured the railroad directly or indirectly.  Here are links to a few samples:
Thanks for that Bill. 
BTW, there's a person in Wellfleet who does van tours through the back roads of Wellfleet and Truro to Hopper's painting locations.  She brings along a 3 ring binder of Hopper prints.  My wife and I have taken this tour and loved it.  It involves numerous crossings  of the New Haven ROW in the area
If there is enough of it left it would seem the former New Haven roadbed on Cape Cod would make a superb rail trail just as the former
St.J. & L.C. roadbed here in Vermont is becoming. I am amazed at how much use the completed sections get all year long!

Cordially, Don Valentine
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BX10
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BX10
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Joined: January 15th, 2010, 12:40 am

March 12th, 2018, 10:34 am #36

I believe that there is a rail trail on the Cape and some of it is on the former ROW

 Bill
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Joined: August 4th, 2017, 5:23 pm

April 7th, 2018, 10:08 am #37

The location of the Howard Fogg RS-2 painting is indeed the north end of Hatch Pond; MP-21 in the Housatonic. One day while running NX-11 north to Canaan I obtained permission from the DS to stop at MP-21 and take a picture. Granted, it was GP35s instead of RS-2s, the surrounding scenery hadn't changed much. I even got to see the sunken remains of the tender frame in Hatch Pond.
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TomCurtin
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Joined: July 13th, 2017, 10:13 am

April 7th, 2018, 1:29 pm #38

rivermanvt wrote:

If there is enough of it left it would seem the former New Haven roadbed on Cape Cod would make a superb rail trail just as the former
St.J. & L.C. roadbed here in Vermont is becoming. I am amazed at how much use the completed sections get all year long!

Cordially, Don Valentine
Don, I guess you haven't been on Cape Cod is quite a while.  The "Cape Cod Rail Trail" runs from South Dennis, continuously, all the way to South Wellfleet, and has for years.  When my wife and I had our second home on the Cape we biked the whole thing --- not in one session, God save us, we weren't that athletic,  it's about 21 miles!!
It has been steadily improved over the years, and I  believe that all the places where detours were once necessary have been fixed with bridges.  A whole lot of people would love to see it completed the remaining 16 miles or so to P'town but I would say that is sadly about as likely as hell freezing over because of many encroachments on the ROW.  More recently the long abandoned (1937) branch from Harwich to Chatham was added.
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Bill Reidy
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Joined: June 1st, 2003, 3:22 am

April 8th, 2018, 9:25 pm #39

TomCurtin wrote:
rivermanvt wrote:

If there is enough of it left it would seem the former New Haven roadbed on Cape Cod would make a superb rail trail just as the former
St.J. & L.C. roadbed here in Vermont is becoming. I am amazed at how much use the completed sections get all year long!

Cordially, Don Valentine
Don, I guess you haven't been on Cape Cod is quite a while.  The "Cape Cod Rail Trail" runs from South Dennis, continuously, all the way to South Wellfleet, and has for years.  When my wife and I had our second home on the Cape we biked the whole thing --- not in one session, God save us, we weren't that athletic,  it's about 21 miles!!
It has been steadily improved over the years, and I  believe that all the places where detours were once necessary have been fixed with bridges.  A whole lot of people would love to see it completed the remaining 16 miles or so to P'town but I would say that is sadly about as likely as hell freezing over because of many encroachments on the ROW.  More recently the long abandoned (1937) branch from Harwich to Chatham was added.
Planning is underway to extend the outer Cape end of the the Cape Cod Rail Trail from its current terminus at Lecount Hollow Road in South Wellfleet along the old railroad right-of-way to the former U.S. Route 6 crossing in Wellfleet.  From there, the trail will have to leave the railroad ROW to get to Provincetown, since ROW ownership has scattered to the winds.

http://www.capecodtimes.com/news/201803 ... n-on-track

At the other end, the extension of the CCRT from South Dennis to South Yarmouth along the railroad ROW is nearly completed.  Plans to extend the trail west of South Yarmouth depart the railroad ROW, since the railroad is still very active here westward.
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Gaffer
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Gaffer
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Joined: October 25th, 2016, 3:52 pm

May 6th, 2018, 1:54 pm #40

The great British painter J.M.W. Turner painted an impressionistic picture of a steam engine coming towards the viewer in his picture entitled 'Rain, Steam and Speed". It was on the Great Western Railroad and Turner painted it around 1844.
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