Print Works station

NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

November 25th, 2007, 3:37 pm #1

Here is some trivia and questions about Print Works station in Cranston RI (also see the Cranston station postings). I have train order 418 Form 19 issued at Plainfield, CT, at 4:31 pm, April 27, 1952 to C and E Engine 1388. It reads: ENGINE 1388 RUN EXTRA PLAINFIELD TO PRINT WORKS. The train is, of course, the second section of the official farewell to steam excursion that left Boston with each train pulled by an I-4 Pacific. I have nine of the orders to 1388 (there must have been many more) the previous one issued at Groton. My question is -- Why Print Works? Its unlikely there was an operator there, especially on a Sunday. Print Works is over two miles from Dike Street where the Willimantic line joins the shore line. How did Extra 1388 obtain authority to run to Providence - was it by telephone to the Promenade Street tower? Was Print Works the start of signalled territory (unlikely)? Did Promenade St control up to Print Works? Did Extra 1388 require orders in signalled territory? In short, why was order 418 written to end at Print Works rather than Dike Street or Providence or Boston?
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Ben Perry1
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Joined: December 31st, 2005, 9:21 pm

November 26th, 2007, 6:53 pm #2

Just a suggestion. Check a ETT for that era, and I think you will find that yard limits were in effect east of Print Works.
Ben Perry
Still doing my yard check at the brewery. Hi Neighbor
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

November 27th, 2007, 2:08 am #3

I think Ben has hit the answer on the mark. Special
Instruction no. 2017 from timetable no. 3 which was dated
April 28, 1957, Shows instructions for Print Works under
Providence Terminal which to me indicates that Print Works
was part of Providence Terminal and in yard limit territory
unless the timetable stated otherwise, train orders for
extra movements were not necessary. The MBS rules ended at
Print Works and yard limits from that point into
Providence. Further to this the Block System rules showed
Rule 317 applied between Print Works and Plainfield.
Being that the trip was an extra train, it had to operate
at yard speed within yard limits and did so without train
orders just like a freight train would do too.
Timetable no. 175 dated April 27, 1952 has the exact same
special instructions for this territory as timetable no. 3
has so that should be the story.
One last note, in the same special instruction no. 2017, it
states that Permission from the operator at Promenade
Street, SS-151 to use main track between Dike Street and
westward yard limits so the train still had to stop at the
yard limit board and call Promenade Street for permission
to continue unless by chance they got that permission at
Plainfield.
Noel Weaver
PS
Another interesting note, a new timetable took effect on
the day of these trips, no. 175, April 27, 1952 and this
timetable so far as I could find had virtually no
instructions of any kind regarding operation of steam
locomotives anywhere on the New Haven Railroad. Some
railroads did this while others left steam locomotive
instructions in the timetable for a period just in case.
Noel Weaver
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Tom Curtin
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Joined: March 28th, 2003, 10:44 pm

November 27th, 2007, 8:15 am #4

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My question is -- Why Print Works? Its unlikely there was an operator there, especially on a Sunday
The answer is that on the Sunday of that fantrip orders were issued to a number of block station along its route that normally wouldn't have been open Sunday, to open. For that trip, which operated two trains (It's not quite correct to say "two sections" in this case, they were "Extra 1372" and "Extra 1388"), one following the other, through a lot of manual block territory, it was necessary to insure a smooth operation by opening stations that day.
The reason I know this is that I acquired the TN for that trip, to assist me in writing a Shoreliner article about it. Some of you are aware I am working a series of articles about the post WWII (1948-1953) steam fantrips. Two have been published. The third is done and will appear a couple of issues from now. The April 27, 1952 trip will be next after that.
BTW, in this regard, I would love to have copies of the orders you have, to go with the article about the trip.
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Dick Otto
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Joined: September 8th, 2004, 6:14 am

November 27th, 2007, 2:19 pm #5

Indulge a little "topic-drift" re: 1388 and Tom's pending articles-- I've requested help in past Forum threads for information about the Vanderbilt tenders V-1/V-2, and others have inquired here about their relatively brief assignment in the 30s to a few I-4s to improve their run-through range before arrival of the I-5s.
Browsing Bob's Photos at the reunion show a couple weeks back, I bought a view I'd never seen before of 1388 dated 1950 at Plainville. It's basically a good 3/4 right side view of the tender -- which most interestingly is a V-2 !! with number on the back of the tank freshly painted out -- therefore, not the normal W-7-A tender it was paired with for its last excursion service. Her main and eccentric rods are gone, so she's seemingly on her way west to scrapping. But wait! If the photo is accurately tagged, this predates her last service and raises some questions--
Was 1388 plucked from the dead-line to run those last trips? Why is she coupled with a V-2? If the photo is misdated and it's after the final run, was her tank possibly swapped out and saved for a tool train supporting steam derrick D-100, 101 or 102?
I'm intrigued. Tom, do you know?
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Tom Curtin
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Joined: March 28th, 2003, 10:44 pm

November 27th, 2007, 4:11 pm #6

Dick wrote
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I bought a view I'd never seen before of 1388 dated 1950 at Plainville. . . . If the photo is accurately tagged, this predates her last service and raises some questions--
Plainville? Do you maybe mean Readville?
I think the photo is almost certainly misdated, and herein lies a most interesting tale. The 1388 ran out her last miles in regular service on the OC Greenbush line in March 1952. Photos of her in those last few years (I have seen a couple) show her equipped with a W-12-C tender (the square 12-wheel kind). In March she was shipped off to the Readville scrap line, and that tender went off to a new career as an oil storage tank at New Bedford. She remained there until just a couple of years ago (You could see, and I did see, the "1388" on the rear of the tender)
Dick wrote
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Was 1388 plucked from the dead-line to run those last trips?
It sure was.
When ticket sales for the 4/27/52 trip required a second section, 1388 was hastily reassembled --- with a few things that didn't quite match. One was the number board under the headlight, which photos of the fantrip clearly show is the wrong-style number board. The other was a new tender which was one of the USRA-style 8-wheel ones, the kind you would have seen with a J-1 or L-1 class engine (Is that what you're calling a W-7-C?). The 1372 still had its W-12-C tender, so this created the oddity that the two trains that day had two very different capacity tenders. I do not know if that created any operational difficulties.
Dick wrote
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Why is she coupled with a V-2?
I absolutely cannot in any way account for the 1388 going to scrap --- or sitting in the scrap line, or whatever --- with a Vanderbilt tender. This is one more for the list of life's imponderables . . .
____________
Thanks due to J W Swanberg's New Haven Power for the story of 1388's premature death and remarkable, if short-lived. resurrection.
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

November 27th, 2007, 7:12 pm #7

The key to 1388 coming back from the scrap line was "tube
time", it made a lot of difference in those days.
It is too bad that the NHRR could not have been convinced
to save one or both of these fine locomotives.
Unfortunately, the New Haven was one of the first major
railroads to fully eliminate steam operstion and there was
not really a genuine movement at that time to save anything
so both went to scrap, probably soon after the final trips.
The last engine assignment book in my bunch that shows any
steam in main line use was the one dated April 29, 1951 and
this shows only 8 I-4's remaining on the roster. Of the
eight engines, 1372 and 1388 had time remaining until
June, 1953 and this was the longest period remaining on the
group of engines.
By April, 1951, most of the remaining steam engines were
either in yard service at Boston, Providence or Cedar Hill
or in local passenger service in the Boston area. On the
passenger end, there were three I-1's of which one was
assigned, ten I-2's of which eight were assigned and eight
I-4's of which three were assigned. They operated to
Needham, New Bedford, Blackstone, Plymouth, Greenbush and
Middleboro.
There were still a few more engines left on the steam
roster but there was not much work for them. Except for
some Boston commuter trains, the great show was over.
Noel Weaver
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Tom Curtin
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Joined: March 28th, 2003, 10:44 pm

November 27th, 2007, 7:38 pm #8

According to Jack Swanberg's great tome, the last two I-4s in regular service were also the last mainline steam in regular service, they were 1387 and 1388 on the Greenbush branch in March 52.
Notice, I said "main line" so I can't get tripped up by those little 0-6-0 tank engines at Van Nest
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

November 27th, 2007, 10:06 pm #9

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Notice, I said "main line" so I can't get tripped up by those little 0-6-0 tank engines at Van Nest
For the class I-4 Pacifics:
MAIN TRACK - A track extending through yards and between stations, upon which trains are operated by time-table or train order, or the use of which is governed by block signals.
For the Van Nest shop switchers:
YARD - A system of tracks within defined limits provided for the making up of trains, storing of cars and other purposes, over which movements not authorized by time-table, or by train order, may be made, subject to prescribed signals and rules, or special instructions.
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