New Haven snow plows

ejdeluca
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Joined: March 25th, 2012, 3:53 pm

September 8th, 2018, 7:05 pm #1

While working on my Shoreliner article about Quinebaug, Ct., I met a man who lived next to the Walker Road crossing there and remembers that in the 1950's the train pushed a huge plow.  He sent me a CV plow picture, but I'd like to show him one that the New Haven used.  Any help is appreciated.
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

September 8th, 2018, 9:38 pm #2

Mr. Ejdeluca. Here are some examples from a quick web search. Here is a picture of New Haven snow plow S-10. Source: http://www.thejumpingfrog.com/?page=sho ... id=1389583
NH S-10 pic 1.jpg
Side view of New Haven Railroad snow plow S-10

Here is a picture of New Haven snow plow S-16. Source: http://www.thejumpingfrog.com/?page=sho ... id=1383915
 
NH S-16.jpg
Side view of New Haven Railroad snow plow S-16
Side view of New Haven Railroad snow plow S-16

Here is a picture of New Haven snow plow S-17. Source: http://www.jumpingfrog.com/images/snapshots/sps0507.jpg
 
NH S-17 pic 1.jpg
Side view of New Haven Railroad snow plow S-17

Here is one of the unique Barber-Greene snow conveyor system. It appears to be conveyor car M-26, snow melting tender M-25, minus the water storage tank car M-27, J-1 Mikado 3016 locomotive to provide steam, and a diesel locomotive to provide movement for the system under the wire on the west end. Source: www.pinterest.com
Barber-Greene machine.jpg
View of a New Haven Railroad Barber-Greene snow removal system
View of a New Haven Railroad Barber-Greene snow removal system
Hope these help some.
Richard #3967
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ejdeluca
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Joined: March 25th, 2012, 3:53 pm

September 10th, 2018, 7:17 am #3

Thanks.  I did not realize they were that long.  Would anybody know if the snowplowing units were sent out of Worcester or Putnam to cover the Southbridge Branch? 
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NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

September 10th, 2018, 11:02 am #4

The Barber-Greene outfit was useful in circumstances where an ordinary plow could not move snow to the side.  Since it lifted snow it had purpose in a yard or large passenger station where using an ordinary plow would only cover another track or a passenger platform.  Maybe it could be useful in a narrow cut.  The only major use that I know of was in Providence on March 20, 1956 when J-1 3020 was in steam for the last time.  However, the Barber-Greene snow lifter was reportedly mainly useful on March 20 to lift snow that had been shoved off the Providence passenger platforms.  Although the March storm was considered severe it didn't dump enough snow to make the Barber-Greene outfit worthwhile and in a few months the three 2-8-2s retained for steam production were condemned.  I did see 3020 in steam on March 20 because the snowstorm wasn't enough to keep me at home. That fact helps explain why the snow meltters were scrapped in 1956 when about ten years old -- there just weren't enough snow situations to make them worth maintaining.

Snow removers were used by other railroads, the Boston & Maine and Canadian National are two that come to mind.  Barber-Greene mainly built snow removers for use on city streets where plows were not as useful.  I don't think they built specifically for railroad use but rather sold equipment that was adapted for railroad use.  The New Haven built its outfits at the Readville shops using the Barber-Greene lifting device.  A month after New Haven 3020 was in steam, I rode the Boston-Portland fan trip behind B&M P-4 4-6-2 3713 which was one of three steamers the B&M had equipped to provide steam to the snow meltters.  Smaller Pacifics and some Moguls were still powering passenger trains at North Station at the time but 3713 was stored only for snow melting  -- I often saw 3713 and snow meltter 0-8-0 622 behind the Boston roundhouse waiting for snow.  Unlike the New Haven J-1s, B&M 3713 was preserved and has been under restoration for the past two decades and with a little luck I may even get a chance to ride behind "The Constitution" again.
0468.jpg My last photo of the NH in steam -- 3020 at Charles Street March 21,1956 the day after supplying steam to the Barber-Greene snow remover.
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jkasey
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jkasey
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Joined: July 6th, 2017, 10:31 am

September 10th, 2018, 12:38 pm #5

The other melter assignments were:
Providence Division
J-1 3020, M-71, M-81 & M-91
Boston Division
J-1 3006 M-70, M-80 & M-90

John
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Peter R Ness
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Joined: December 17th, 2005, 1:21 am

September 12th, 2018, 6:39 pm #6

Between at least 1951-56 - and probably longer before and after, but that's the range of years for which I have Caboose and Work Equipment Assignment Books - S-9 out of Worcester was assigned to cover Worcester to Groton and the Southbridge Branch.

Regards,
Peter
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ejdeluca
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Joined: March 25th, 2012, 3:53 pm

September 12th, 2018, 8:17 pm #7

Reply to Peter Ness.  First off, thanks to all who supplied me with information.  Now, according to a 1953 "Assignment of work equipment and cabooses" book that I have, S-9 is listed also.  And in Shoreliner mag vol 21, issue 1, 1990 (written by local friend John Mrazik) on page 20, it actually shows S-9 at Webster. (I'll assume taken in the 60's? And will appreciate any comments on that.)  This type plow is the one remembered by the gent who saw that action in Quinebaug in the 50's.  So, much thanks to Peter and John for helping me narrow that one down!  And I guess now  to sidetrack things, in Shoreliner vol 28, issue 2 (written by me) on page on page 34 it shows an M (number ?) Jordan Spreader at Putnam in 1966.  That unit is also listed in my 1953 work assignment  book and it says its location was Worcester.  The use for that machine was listed as "Mtce" and snow removal.  What does "Mtce" stand for?  Funny how one thing leads to another. 
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

September 12th, 2018, 8:47 pm #8

MTCE = Make The Cides Even 😉😁
Richard #3967
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jkasey
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jkasey
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Joined: July 6th, 2017, 10:31 am

September 13th, 2018, 9:07 am #9

ejdeluca wrote: Reply to Peter Ness.  First off, thanks to all who supplied me with information.  Now, according to a 1953 "Assignment of work equipment and cabooses" book that I have, S-9 is listed also.  And in Shoreliner mag vol 21, issue 1, 1990 (written by local friend John Mrazik) on page 20, it actually shows S-9 at Webster. (I'll assume taken in the 60's? And will appreciate any comments on that.)  This type plow is the one remembered by the gent who saw that action in Quinebaug in the 50's.  So, much thanks to Peter and John for helping me narrow that one down!  And I guess now  to sidetrack things, in Shoreliner vol 28, issue 2 (written by me) on page on page 34 it shows an M (number ?) Jordan Spreader at Putnam in 1966.  That unit is also listed in my 1953 work assignment  book and it says its location was Worcester.  The use for that machine was listed as "Mtce" and snow removal.  What does "Mtce" stand for?  Funny how one thing leads to another. 
The only thing that I can think of is that that was the New Haven's way of abbreviating "MainTenanCE" in the 50s (?) Maybe it should be added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary along with the 840+ new stupid words added recently! What ev! LOL

John
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NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

September 13th, 2018, 10:39 am #10

Mtce

Mtce  -- a phonetic way of writing maintenance.
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