Mystery stone arch bridge. Canal line??

rrtrax2
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Joined: July 16th, 2007, 3:27 pm

February 15th, 2018, 11:54 am #1

mystery2.jpeg
- Bob Belletzkie / TylerCityStation / rrtrax2@yahoo.com
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

February 15th, 2018, 8:19 pm #2

I don't recall any bridges on the Canal Line of this nature, in addition it is probably too wide maybe 2 or more tracks.
Noel Weaver
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TomNelligan
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 4:57 am

February 15th, 2018, 9:59 pm #3

It looks to me like an early photo of the Farmington River viaduct in Windsor, CT.

http://photos.nerail.org/s/?p=242043
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

February 15th, 2018, 10:59 pm #4

TomNelligan wrote: It looks to me like an early photo of the Farmington River viaduct in Windsor, CT.

http://photos.nerail.org/s/?p=242043
That is a great picture you took of the viaduct Mr. Nelligan that is posted on the link you provided. 
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

February 15th, 2018, 11:00 pm #5

TomNelligan wrote: It looks to me like an early photo of the Farmington River viaduct in Windsor, CT.

http://photos.nerail.org/s/?p=242043
That is a great picture of the viaduct that you took Mr. Nelligan, and is posted on the link you provided.
Sorry for the double post, but Tapatalk went to a blank screen when I hit submit, and then reopened on the post screen. So, I didn't know my first post posted.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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Dick Otto
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Joined: September 8th, 2004, 6:14 am

February 16th, 2018, 12:07 am #6

Bob-- I also first suspected the Farmington River brownstone arches, but after comparison with many photos including Tom's on-line images and a couple 8x10s from the 1940s in my own collection, I've concluded it's not.  FR has pilasters at each pier, whereas mystery bridge doesn't and FR has an extra decorative plinth-stone atop each pilaster, set upon the capstone course.  FR has single capstone course, whereas mystery bridge has corbeled double course.  FR has fewer overall number of arch-stones than mystery bridge and number of horizontal stone courses differs between them.

I'd rather tell you I know where this view is, but I cannot -- still it's useful to head off a well intended misidentification.
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

February 16th, 2018, 12:48 am #7

Mr. Bob. Since the picture was labeled "The Bryant Press, Florence, Mass." I looked for maps of Florence and the area. After looking at several maps, I believe that is the viaduct belonging to the New Haven & Northampton Railroad. If you look at the map at: http://www.old-maps.com/ma/ma_towns/ham ... 23_web.jpg, you will see a long viaduct across fields and then the Mill River on this 1873 map. Of all the maps of Hampshire County, this seems the best fit based on the dome-like roof with spire in the far distance beneath the far left arch. If you were standing on the E.D. Clapp property taking the picture northward, the spire lines up just about right to belong to the main building of the "Northhampton Lunatic Hospital" (political correctness definately did not exist back in 1873). Searches for New Haven & Northampton RR viaduct images, Mill River viaduct images, and Northampton viaduct images met with negative results for anything resembling the viaduct in the picture. Maybe someone else has pictures of the Mill River viaduct or the New Haven & Northampton RR.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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rrtrax2
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Joined: July 16th, 2007, 3:27 pm

February 16th, 2018, 8:05 am #8

Richard Fleischer emailed me the following:

A little more research found the photograph.  It was made by William H. Rau and shows the Pennsylvania Railroad's Mill Creek Bridge in Lancaster County, Pa.   See Michael Froio's blog http://michaelfroio.com/blog/?tag=William+H+Rau  Scroll down to "God's Country/The PRR in Eastern Lancaster County"   The photograph is titled Plate 68 Mill Creek Bridge.

The mystery photo is cropped a bit but exactly the same otherwise. Too bad we can't see more of the train but the scene apparently was more important to Rau than the equipment on the beautiful stone bridge. Is this a little odd since he was working for the PRR, traveling on the special train on the bridge, and says he chose his spots very carefully?

William Herman Rau (January 19, 1855 – November 19, 1920) was an American photographer, active primarily in the latter half of the 19th and early 20th centuries. He is best remembered for his stereo cards of sites around the world, and for his panoramic photographs of sites along the Pennsylvania Railroad.[1] He was official photographer of the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904, and of the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland in 1905.[2] His work is now included in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution and the Getty Museum. From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Rau

For the camera buffs, read Rau's own words:  https://books.google.com/books?id=ARA_A ... 22&f=false

The Bryant Press, Florence, Mass. is something of a red herring and would naturally lead to suspicion that the mystery photo was in that area. Nice 1873 map of Northampton, Mr. Sullivan! One wonders how common it was for another press to publish someone's work without attribution. That does a disservice to those who wish to know the actual location but most of all to the photographer who gets neither credit nor royalty. Another lesson learned about old photographs. Is there the possibility that it was published anonymously with Rau's permission for some reason, and he was compensated?

So not New Haven, or even close. Thanks to all who offered input...
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frn1963
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Joined: August 29th, 2003, 4:15 pm

February 16th, 2018, 8:50 am #9

(As a college kid in the 80’s I had a summer job working at the Bettmann Archive which had just taken over the UPI Photo Collection. The Rau negatives were part of that collection — 8 x 10 glass negatives, some in rather poor shape. I might have handled this one. No idea where they are now. Even more coincidentally, one of my classmates at the time, from Lancaster PA, had the middle name “Rau”...)


Fred Nangle
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

February 16th, 2018, 9:03 am #10

Mr. Bob. Mr. Rau's pictures are great for the light contrasts and the sharpness of the various images. I especially like "Main Line, looking west, Altoona, Pennsylvania." I agree with you on the lack of photographers credit, especially on this photo in the Hampshire County paper. I fined it wierd that the Plate 68 Mill Creek Bridge has the shared names of the river/creek of "Mill," Mill Creek verses Mill River. I wonder if that dome-like roof with the spire is either a barn or church, and the angle being coincidental with the hospital on the Northampton map is another wierd coincidence. That it was staged with old equipment is another red herring in photo-interperting the scene.
Thanks for the full rundown.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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