Middleboro Junction

SteveBBRail
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Joined: September 12th, 2018, 4:16 pm

September 12th, 2018, 4:32 pm #1

Does anyone have any information as to exactly where Middleboro Junction was located?

The attached photos show to main tracks on a long, straight stretch, two tracks diverting, a ball signal,
and what appears to be a mile post with the number "33."

Thank you,

Steve Bartlett NYNH&H_Middleboro Mass_Ball Signal_nd__1_edited.jpg NYNH&H__Middleboro Mass_Ball Signal_nd__2_edited.jpg
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Vandibe
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Vandibe
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Joined: March 20th, 2017, 5:57 pm

September 12th, 2018, 4:52 pm #2

Try UCONN DODD at the following URL:

https://archives.lib.uconn.edu/islandor ... uationMaps

This link takes to you to all the valuation maps for Middleboro Junction. Time periods (early 1900s) for the maps are consistent with the second postcard photo.

Once you have the correct valuation map, you should be able to match that to current day GOOGLE Earth.


Eric
#5645

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Ron High
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Joined: June 6th, 2003, 4:08 pm

September 12th, 2018, 7:49 pm #3

go to the  home page   http://www.nhrhta.org/   on the right side of the page is a column of links scroll down to  MAP OF THE NEW HAVEN RR/NHRHTA PUBLICATIONS BY LINE  click on this link    A larger map of the New Haven Railroad, from a 1929 train schedule, can also be viewed    on the map click on Middleboro it will bring up a list of NHRHTA Shoreliner and other NHRHTA material that relates to Middleboro you should find something there.
Ron High
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Run 8
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Run 8
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Joined: December 10th, 2013, 9:11 pm

September 12th, 2018, 10:06 pm #4

The second image makes me think of Cotley. Jct. looking southward toward NewBedford/Fall River.
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Bill Reidy
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Joined: June 1st, 2003, 3:22 am

September 13th, 2018, 6:33 am #5

This is Cotley Junction in Taunton, MA.  It's located near where Route 24 crosses Route 140.  In the second photo, the tracks diverging to the left head toward Middleboro, while the tracks to the right head to New Bedford, Fall River and at one time Newport.

Some more information here:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middleboro_Subdivision
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

September 13th, 2018, 9:32 am #6

Run 8 wrote: The second image makes me think of Cotley. Jct. looking southward toward NewBedford/Fall River.
Could be because Middleboro Jct. and Cotley Jct. are one and the same.
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Run 8
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Run 8
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September 13th, 2018, 9:40 am #7

Statkowski wrote:
Run 8 wrote: The second image makes me think of Cotley. Jct. looking southward toward NewBedford/Fall River.
Could be because Middleboro Jct. and Cotley Jct. are one and the same.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When did the name change? In all my time on that road I never heard it referred to Middleboro Junction, even by the old timers (late 30's'-early 40's men).
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NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

September 13th, 2018, 11:32 am #8

NAME CHANGE
I don't know precisely when the Middleboro Junction became Cotley Junction but my September 25,1932 employee timetable has it as Cotley Jct.  but the May 1, 1928 official list of stations has it still listed as Middleboro Jct.   Maybe the name changed when the Myricks-Middleboro track was removed and routes changed but I don't know the date of that change.

Below are 1917 and 1959 maps showing wye locations in the area (Middleboro Jct is blurred in the top map but is shown as Cotley Jct. in the bottom map).  Note that trains could not be routed NY, Providence, Cape Cod in 1917 without a reverse or back-up move.  The Alden-Pilgrim cutoff shown (names not shown) at Middleboro in the bottom map allowed a smooth route to the Cape from the west.
IMG_0001-020.jpg
IMG_0002-019.jpg
Last edited by NH746EJO on September 13th, 2018, 11:59 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

September 13th, 2018, 11:40 am #9

Sometimes names change, sometimes they live on forever.  Out here in Western Pennsylvania there's a PennDOT road sign which says "Bradley Junction" with an arrow pointing in its direction.  The railroad junction there hasn't been a junction since 1985, and with all the undergrowth it's getting harder to find remains of the junction, but the roadside signs still point to it.
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NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

September 13th, 2018, 12:11 pm #10

NAMES WITH LONG LIVES

It is not unusual to see a street named "Station Street" or "Depot Street" even though any sign of a station or rail line has been gone for many decades  --- such names help pinpoint the location of some long gone place.  "Engine Street" is one of my favorite names that still exists -- it led to a New Haven roundhouse.  However, sometimes an old name doesn't help.  I live near "University Station Road" but have never been able to pinpoint the location of the depot even though I have photos and the old Southern RR line that still operates in the same location. 
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