Hump Slug

nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

August 2nd, 2018, 5:13 am #1

I never saw this image in the Mike Robbins collection before:

“This switcher team of locomotive and slug were used for hump service. The slug was rebuilt for a NHRR EY-3 electric switcher 216 in 1952 by the Van Nest Shop. The slug was and locomotive were both MU equipped for this service to provide the extra tractive effort at low speed that was required to perform the hump duties.”

F7C3A8F1-1190-40D8-94DF-24590E6EECBF.jpeg
Class EY-3
9DD3BBB9-DF78-48E4-AA62-F8E1D371C9BF.jpeg
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

August 2nd, 2018, 8:49 am #2

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). Mr. J. W. Swanberg mentioned, "And EY-3 0216(by then the 216) was rebuilt by Van Nest in 1952 to hump trailer DT-1 for use as a "slug" unit with Alco S-2 0609 for Hartford hump service." on page 348 of his New Haven Power 1838-1968 (1988). There is a different picture on page 351 with the caption reading, "Here's what became of 216 (ex-0216). In Apr. 1952 Van Nest Shops rebuilt it into slug DT-1, here shown working Hartford hump, May 22, 1956." Since I don't pln on modeling the Hartford area at this time, I'm not planning on making a model of the slug DT-1, which was the only slug on the New Haven from what I've read.
Thanks for sharing that image by Mr. Mike Robbins.
Richard #3967
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

August 2nd, 2018, 9:25 am #3

Richard:

I didn’t know the NH had any slugs.  Does Swanberg mention what engine was used to rebuild the EY-3 into the DT-1?  The low profile of the hood compared to the S-2 has me wondering what’s under it.

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

August 2nd, 2018, 9:44 am #4

What's under the hood?  Blower motors for cooling the traction motors.  A slug was unpowered and received its electrical current from the mother engine.  The addition of a slug to a 1,000-h.p. Alco S-2 made it almost the equivalent of two 600-h.p. Alco S-1s, but for far less acquisition cost.
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

August 2nd, 2018, 10:31 am #5

Mr. Ed(nhhe52). Yes he did. It was EY-3 0216, the first of the only two EY-3's. You have the picture of EY-3 0217 in your original post, and there are a pictures of EY-3 0216 on pages 350 and 351 of New Haven Power 1838-1968 (1988). As to what is under the hood was explained very well by Mr. Statkowski above. Mr. Swanberg said in the caption mentioned above, "Slugs took electricity from the mother engine's main generator (Alco S-2 0609) for their own traction motors, and were used by many roads for low speed hump or transfer service. The New Haven's only slug, DT-1 was condemned in 1962." I thought that I saw a picture of the Cedar Hill hump with DT-1 216 and S-2 0609 shoving cars up the grade, but I haven't been able to find it. So, I can't say that the DT-1/S-2 really operated anywhere else besides the Hartford hump.
Richard #3967
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

August 2nd, 2018, 1:23 pm #6

Thanks Guys:

Learned something new agin today.

Ed
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Vandibe
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Vandibe
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Joined: March 20th, 2017, 5:57 pm

August 3rd, 2018, 12:41 am #7

Hey Ed, Funny you posted this; I saw it a few days ago too, right after I purchased this photo (photographer unknown, location and date not recorded):
Eric
#5645
NH DT-1 with GE 44 ton 1.jpg
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

August 3rd, 2018, 5:14 am #8

Mr. Eric. A probable location would be the dead line between the oil/fuel tank farm and the westbound NY & Maybrook Departure Tracks near and just west of the Cedar Hill roundhouse area. The date would be post-1962. Here is my rational. Over the years you can see so many classifications of diesel-electrics and electric locomotives lined up, and often the doors are left open, on the first three tracks of the NY & Maybrook Departure Tracks in various pictures of the Cedar Hill Yard. The three locomotives are probably on the second or third track as the camera is facing a westwardly direction. I say this as the type of overhead wire pulloff tower seen in the background is the same type used in the Cedar Hill Yard and you can see several catenary wires behind the DT-1. This matches the varioyus pictures of the area such as the centerfold of Shoreliner, vol. 20, iss. 4, and the 1954 areial photo of the Cedar Hill roundhouse area on page 56 of Memories of the New Haven, Vol. 3 (1986). In the aerial photo the third row and some of the second row towers have a "Y" shape, but the ones close into the dead head tracks are single tower structures. 
The problem with using the towers as a locator is they were used at other locations in the westend.
Here is the something interesting (my opinion) about the DT-1. On the Standing Data NHRTI-4.1.1, Diesel Locomotive Roster (1970, 1974), the DT-1 is listed last. It reads, "DT-1 (EY-3 Chassis GE 1926)1952 Booster Unit, Tractive Effort 60,400, Weight 241,600, Drivers 42", Service Switcher, Trucks B-B, Body Slug"
Richard #3967
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