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NHRHTA1
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Joined: 12 Apr 2003, 09:17

21 Jul 2017, 23:52 #11

GROAN
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Vandibe
Member
Joined: 20 Mar 2017, 21:57

07 Sep 2017, 15:00 #12

All, I'm real new to the New Haven so forgive the following...

Shoreliner Vol 38 Issue 1, pg 37 bottom figure of DAY CAPE CODDER, Train 105 on 1 Aug 1952 appears (to me at least) to show one of these passenger dome cars in the rear of the train (next to last car). If it's not a dome, which I'm not arguing it is, what in the world is it? Could it be a sleeper, or a maybe another heavyweight diner?

I just can't make it out.

Eric


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rsullivan
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Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

08 Sep 2017, 02:25 #13

Mr. Vandibe. I looked at it under a magnifier and what I saw was the top of the roof was just about even with the two stainless steel streamline passenger cars on each end. The roof appears flat for the whole length. A short vertical drop goes from one end to the other, and at the base of the drop is a sharply arched roof connecting to the passenger car letterboard. To me it appears to be a heavy weight passenger car with the non-air conditioning duct side visible. That is why the verticle drop of the clerestory roof is visible for the whole length of the passenger car. The air conditioning duct side would have a bulge along the clerestory connecting the top of the roof to the letterboard for the length of the ducts emptying into the car's interior. I suspect it was a parlor car since the April 26, 1953 consist list E Parlor, Sleeping and Dining Car Service on pages 20 and 21 of Shoreliner, vol 39, iss 3, show the Day Cape Codder having parlor car, dining or grill car, and coaches in the consist. By 1953, all name train out of New York would have streamline passenger cars from either the first order or the stainless steel fleets, and the caption of the consist chart reads "The business was there, and there was a great deal of it, so much so, that many heavy weight cars remained in service to cover the demand up until 1958." So, based on the flat roof line the whole length of the car, the height of the roof just a little above the streamline cars on each end of it, the clerestory roof, and the need to use heavy weight parlor cars on named passenger trains, I believe you are looking at one of the New Haven's heavy weight parlor cars that was not converted into a commuter coach in the butterflies to caterpillars program. That is my photo interpertation, and I welcome anyone else to help out, because I could always be wrong.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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Vandibe
Member
Joined: 20 Mar 2017, 21:57

18 Sep 2017, 20:00 #14

rsullivan wrote: Mr. Vandibe. I looked at it under a magnifier and what I saw was the top of the roof was just about even with the two stainless steel streamline passenger cars on each end. The roof appears flat for the whole length. A short vertical drop goes from one end to the other, and at the base of the drop is a sharply arched roof connecting to the passenger car letterboard. To me it appears to be a heavy weight passenger car with the non-air conditioning duct side visible. That is why the verticle drop of the clerestory roof is visible for the whole length of the passenger car. The air conditioning duct side would have a bulge along the clerestory connecting the top of the roof to the letterboard for the length of the ducts emptying into the car's interior. I suspect it was a parlor car since the April 26, 1953 consist list E Parlor, Sleeping and Dining Car Service on pages 20 and 21 of Shoreliner, vol 39, iss 3, show the Day Cape Codder having parlor car, dining or grill car, and coaches in the consist. By 1953, all name train out of New York would have streamline passenger cars from either the first order or the stainless steel fleets, and the caption of the consist chart reads "The business was there, and there was a great deal of it, so much so, that many heavy weight cars remained in service to cover the demand up until 1958." So, based on the flat roof line the whole length of the car, the height of the roof just a little above the streamline cars on each end of it, the clerestory roof, and the need to use heavy weight parlor cars on named passenger trains, I believe you are looking at one of the New Haven's heavy weight parlor cars that was not converted into a commuter coach in the butterflies to caterpillars program. That is my photo interpertation, and I welcome anyone else to help out, because I could always be wrong.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Thank you Richard! I didn't have a magnifying glass to look closer; all I could see is what appeared (to me) to be the dome hump. And I don't have a consist book, so I could not do adequate research on what the railroad normally deployed.

P.S. Born and raised in Louisville before leaving for college and joining the Navy. You represent KY well!

Eric Vandiver
#5645 
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rsullivan
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Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

18 Sep 2017, 23:12 #15

Mr. Vandiver. I was born and raised in Connecticut, and fondly recall watching the fast paced and over crowded rails of the Valley Branch when a train headed by a RS-3 (maybe RS-2) with a few cars and a caboose would slowly pass by, maybe daily. It's those memories that I'm trying to capture by modeling the New Haven Division starting at Oak Point Yard on the Harlem River Branch. Decided on this specific county out of the entire world after 22 years in the Army since it has one of the top rated school districts with more AP courses (the only one with AP physics in the region), one of the largest concentrations manufacturing facilities with supporting businesses with annual payrolls exceeding $45million, tourism industry with annual payrolls exceeding $28million, agricultural businesses with annual payrolls exceeding $24million, and retail with annual payrolls exceeding $21million, and a cost of living low enough that my family could get by on the Army retirement initially that was at the proverty level. It was a good decision. While I didn't get a piece of those pies, I did get back to being a cop. Paid for two undergrad degrees for children, and now living the American dream of being up to my eyeballs in debt. (You will have to ask Mr. Derek if that is also a dream for Canadiens/Canadians.) Made one of the re-unions at Stamford, and bug my wife to let me go to the next one each year. Now that I'm retired, I have the time to research and examine everything and present it to help anyone out. But, L'ville is a fun town to visit.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3867
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