Electrics at Work

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

11 Oct 2016, 18:00 #41

Rick:
Perhaps this anchor bridge wiring diagram from Al Brecken will help you get started: Image
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Last edited by nhhe52 on 11 Oct 2016, 18:19, edited 2 times in total.
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

02 Feb 2017, 18:03 #42

Perhaps those that spent time at the Cos Cob Power Plant, Load Dispatch Tower or nearby can provide some direction:

I'm working with CMR to build the Cos Cob power plant back drop model for me and I'm looking for the following information:

From the available literature, the Cos Cob Power Plant exterior was constructed of concrete blocks cast on site, tile roofing as manufactured by Ludowici and steel framed windows:

Was the color of the concrete blocks the typical yellow-sand color of New Haven poured concrete of the period, similar to the remaining Load Dispatch Tower?
Although a different shape roof tile, was the color of the tile reddish-brown also similar to the roofing of the remaining Load Dispatch Tower?
Were the steel window frames painted dark brown?

Thanks

For those that asked for the progress on the Cos Cob bridge and related details, I've uploading new images below.  Building the timber pilings and painting of the track will be next up:
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Last edited by nhhe52 on 03 Feb 2017, 02:11, edited 3 times in total.
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

03 Feb 2017, 00:31 #43

Mr. Ed, that is fantastic modelling. I'm very impressed. Thank you for sharing those pictures with us.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr. member #3967
3668 Lone Valley Road
Calvert City, Kentucky 42029-8322
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haksawjoes
Member
Joined: 02 Jan 2006, 22:32

03 Feb 2017, 02:00 #44

Outstanding prototypical model work! Thanks for the photo update.
Joe Smith #1253
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DBrion
Member
Joined: 21 Jun 2006, 05:52

03 Feb 2017, 02:37 #45

Museum quality modeling.  Thank you for sharing!
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

04 Feb 2017, 00:21 #46

Thanks for all the compliments.


I do need help on the power plant exterior finishes if any one has had that personal experience.

Thanks again,


Ed
Last edited by nhhe52 on 04 Feb 2017, 05:04, edited 1 time in total.
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bogman102
Member
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 09:40

04 Feb 2017, 12:56 #47

Beautiful work Ed! It looks great!



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Tom Curtin
Member
Joined: 29 Mar 2003, 03:44

04 Feb 2017, 14:41 #48

I'm impressed.  Cos Cob is a monstrous undertaking.  Has anybody else done this?
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

13 Oct 2017, 02:38 #49

Rick Abramson wrote: Thanks to Ed, I have a set of these gorgeous circuit breakers. Question is, when do I begin to modify my anchor bridges. . .stay tuned!!
Anyone have a diagram or images of how the NH triangular overhead wire transitioned to the beam suspended wire, as both were used in different sections?   So they had to transition.   Some sections had a single parabolic suspension wire, catenary bridge to bridge, no suspension beam.

The trolley wire is the constant so was the transition point just made to the suspension wire at a catenary bridge?

Thanks,

Ed
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

13 Oct 2017, 05:58 #50

Mr. Ed(nhhe52) I'm not sure if this is what you are asking for. 


Fig 13 - Section Insulator diagram pic 3.jpg
Figure 13 - Section Insulator diagram from Street railway Journal, Vol. XXX, No. 7, page 250
Figure 13 - Section Insulator diagram from Street railway Journal, Vol. XXX, No. 7, page 250

The figure 13 is a trolley section break insulator. It "consists of two bronze end castings, to which the ends of the trolley wire are bolted. Two parallel sections of impregnated hardwood are fastened to these castings, and to these wooden strips are fastened renewable pieces of trolley wire in such a manner that the ends of these renewable pieces overlap one another in distance along the track, although the two wires are electrically distinct. By this means it is possible for the sliding contact on the locomotive to pass from one section to the next without opening the circuit, thus avoiding all flashing." Street Railway Journal, Vol. XXX, No. 7, Page 251. Page 252 of the same issue of the Journal there is a picture of the Section Insulators in place on triangular cantenary at a section bridge with a crossover trolley wire for an on ground switch. This sounds like the mechanism used for all sections to allow the transition from one section to the next regardless of catenary style. I hope this is what you were looking for.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr. member #3967
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