EF-4's Virginians or Bricks?

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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 18th, 2017, 4:48 pm #51

Run 8 wrote:
Horns are used for a lot more reasons than sounding a warning at grade crossings. A whole LOT more.

Those Virginians most likely sported three-chime Leslies in their New Haven days, but Nathans were probably OEM when they were first delivered.
I prefer the sound of the Nathan horns, much more forceful!  The Leslie's sound a bit wimpy in comparison, at least in the audio files, perhaps different in the day, real time.http://dieselairhorns.com/sounds/NathanM3.mp3

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 18th, 2017, 5:35 pm #52

The EF-4s were always operated in pairs, back-to-back.  I don't believe they were dual-control engines.  As for the pair in question, the front unit had a Faively pantograph and the second unit had nothing.  Money was tight, and the set operated just as well jumpered together.  When they got some money, they'd replace the missing pantograph.  Not unlike running your car at night with one burnt-out headlight - it works, but what happens if the working one burns out, too?  And, if both units had pantographs, it was preferred that the trailing pantograph be the one collecting the current.

Oh, when the pantograph got vaporized, New Rochelle reported no tripped circuits on its power board.
Last edited by Statkowski on May 18th, 2017, 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rick Abramson
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Joined: March 9th, 2003, 2:00 am

May 18th, 2017, 7:35 pm #53

There was a Tom Donahue centerspread in a Shoreliner with 3 Viginians mu'd. Some EF-4s were lacking rectifier tubes since they cost $3000.00ea. The lack of tubes reduced their HP.
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PegLegGuy
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Joined: January 31st, 2018, 7:54 am

January 31st, 2018, 12:18 pm #54

.
.
I loved those big orange beasts!

I'm 68.

Raised in Elmhurst, Queens.

1 block from the great stone overpass at Queens Blvd & 74th St.

The ROW of the NYCRR was 40 feet from our backyard.

As kids, we spent a lot of time "playing" on those tracks!

Some engineers, Noel Weaver?, would toss us ETT's & train orders.

We hopped freights to Oak Point & Bay Ridge too!

Noel & Ski must've rolled by our house many times.


PegLegGuy


.
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NewHavenGeek
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Joined: November 1st, 2017, 7:52 pm

February 1st, 2018, 7:20 am #55

BX10 wrote: I recently came across Vol. 11 Issue 3 of the Shoreliner, in it there is an article by C.A. Brown entitled "THE NEW HAVEN EF-4's "BRICKS". On page 30the author writes "The red-orange body earned the nickname "Bricks" on the New Haven"
 So were they known as Virginians or as Bricks on the New Haven?
 Bill
depends on who you ask. If you ask an exNH employee, they might call them either. Railfans (or foamers if you're so inclined) generally call them Virginians while modelers/scholars will more often call them bricks
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AntonioFP45
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Joined: April 15th, 2011, 7:32 pm

February 10th, 2018, 7:56 pm #56

Hello guys, it's been quite a while since I've posted. I saw the EF-4's in action as a kid and have been a fan for years. I bought a Bachmann version, new-in-the-box a few years back. The model, to me, is beautiful but the detailing is sparse, especially the underbody. Has there been a "tip guide" posted on this forum or on the web that includes photos that provides info on what parts are needed and where to place them? I'm assuming that some may have to be fabricated. Would appreciate any info, thank you! ;-)
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Joined: August 4th, 2017, 5:23 pm

February 11th, 2018, 5:48 am #57

The Virginians were never called "bricks." In H. Reid's book on the VGN he commented that "the EL-C's possessed the beauty of misshapen bricks."
Somehow, some buff(s) morphed that into a nickname for the EF-4s'. Its the same thing as how Arthur Dubin named the 8200s "American Flyer Cars."
I always heard NH engineers refer to the EF-4s as "Virginians."
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AntonioFP45
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Joined: April 15th, 2011, 7:32 pm

February 11th, 2018, 7:44 pm #58

Richard Abramson wrote: The Virginians were never called "bricks." In H. Reid's book on the VGN he commented that "the EL-C's possessed the beauty of misshapen bricks."
Somehow, some buff(s) morphed that into a nickname for the EF-4s'. Its the same thing as how Arthur Dubin named the 8200s "American Flyer Cars."
I always heard NH engineers refer to the EF-4s as "Virginians."
Rick, so glad to read from you. I still have the video that you sent me years ago and enjoy it.  Thanks for that info. I'm guilty of getting into the habit of calling the EF-4's "bricks" as some other modelers and fans have.
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AntonioFP45
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Joined: April 15th, 2011, 7:32 pm

February 11th, 2018, 8:12 pm #59

BTW: I used to wonder what the cab interiors of the EF-4's looked like. I was pleasantly surprised to find a YouTube vid with a Train Simulator clip featuring the EF-4. It is really cool. Interesting how the emphasis by the builder was purely on practicality and function. Sparse on aesthetics, like many American and European electrics that were built back in the day. Amazed me that to raise the pantograph a hand pump has to be actuated. Here is the link to the clip: 
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DBrion
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:52 am

February 11th, 2018, 8:36 pm #60

Simulator was interesting but not very informative.  Whoever was working the graphics moved them around quite a bit and very rapidly,  The guy speaking spoke too fast and often low, so whatever he was trying to tell us did not always come across clearly.

BUT, I'm not complaining.  It provided me with 3+ minutes of what appeared to be a great locomotive to operate in real life.
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