nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 5th, 2017, 11:46 pm #31

It would take at least 30 minutes for the freights to pass early evenings above my house which was located under the Queens side Hell Gate approach. So 100 to 125 cars at 35 to 45 miles per hour sounds about right. This was in the mid to late 1950's. I loved every minute of hearing the locomotives approaching and the clatter of the freight car wheels over the rail joints after the roar of the locomotives had past.


I remember hearing the locomotives gear down to make the grade. I'm very interested to know from Noel the sequence of operation and what type of locomotives where running at that time period that needed to gear down to pull the load up and over the bridge.
Last edited by nhhe52 on May 6th, 2017, 12:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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NHRHTA1
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Joined: April 12th, 2003, 5:17 am

May 8th, 2017, 2:02 pm #32

Ah, Ed the engines had no transmission shifting gear train. The speeds were all controlled electrically (Series Parallel etc,) What you may have heard on the descending grade was the dynamic braking on the diesels (if it was working) the Motors had none.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 8th, 2017, 2:43 pm #33

Thanks Wayne:
Interesting.  I couldn't discern the direction the trains were traveling as I couldn't see the trains from below and the sound was reverberating off buildings and the concrete piers of the viaduct above.  I assumed is was a downshifting for a climbing grade but now that you mention it the trains could have already passed over the bridge and in reality what I was hearing was the application of the dynamics brakes on the downward grade (0.7%) on the Queens side, (Eastern Viaduct) as opposed to my perception that the trains were approaching the Hell Gate from Queens.  There is also a curve, though slight, at the location of my house so the dynamic breaks may have been used to negotiation the curve as well as the downward grade.

There is more to this than meets the ear.  

Ed
Last edited by nhhe52 on May 8th, 2017, 2:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

May 8th, 2017, 3:53 pm #34

The Virginians had dynamic brakes which lasted for a few months until they disconnected them. They worked very well especially EB on Hell Gate Bridge and West Haven hill which were the only two locations that I ever used them at.
Transition did exist on the jets and was worked using the controller. I seem to recall no transition circuits on the Virginians but they did have the buck/boost feature similar to what existed on the 150's which also worked quite well. I think the traction motors were always in parallel.
Noel Weaver
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Run 8
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Run 8
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Joined: December 10th, 2013, 9:11 pm

May 8th, 2017, 7:11 pm #35

Why did the New Haven disconnect/disable dynamic brakes? The "pros" of their use seem to outweigh the "cons".
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NHRHTA1
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Joined: April 12th, 2003, 5:17 am

May 8th, 2017, 10:15 pm #36

From all the Company correspondence I have read and talks with NHRR operating people it was one simple thing MAINTENANCE COSTS! 
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TBChin
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TBChin
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Joined: November 10th, 2006, 3:16 pm

May 10th, 2017, 9:35 pm #37

  All the comments about the worth of the EF-4's is very interesting.  $20,000 ea.  I don't think the ex-GN Y-1's (PRR FF-2) were as successful, they were built in 1927, used as pushers on the PRR, some lasted 10 years. Cost was $27,500 ea.
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Rick Abramson
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Joined: March 9th, 2003, 2:00 am

May 10th, 2017, 9:46 pm #38

Tom:

What you say is true. The Y-1s were extremely successful on the GN; mountain service for which they were designed. Their usage on the PRR was totally opposite what they were designed for.
In some instances, while pushing they actually spun off their tires.
There is no question that the EF-4s were a major plus for the NH. Kudos for the trustees for buying them.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 10th, 2017, 10:00 pm #39

With the PRR's FF-2s, I think they got their money's worth at $27,500 each.  A new diesel-electric would have cost ten times that price.

With the New Haven's EF-4s, the trustees were between a rock and a hard place.  Purchasing the ex-VGN/N&W EL-Cs plus the cost of restringing what had to be restrung was the lesser of two evils.
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Rick Abramson
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Joined: March 9th, 2003, 2:00 am

May 11th, 2017, 1:15 am #40

Before the wires were re-strung between Cedar Hill and New Haven, the trains would leave Cedar Hill with diesels and swap power for the Virginians in NH station.
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