EF-4's Virginians or Bricks?

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 3rd, 2017, 7:18 pm #21

Thanks again,


Ed
Last edited by nhhe52 on May 3rd, 2017, 8:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Noel Weaver
Member
Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

May 4th, 2017, 7:32 pm #22

This reminds me of a time in my firing days when I had a regular job out of Bay Ridge with these motors.  I had a great engineer to work with and I got a lot of good freight experience with him.  It was a relief job making two round trips a week so I was able to hold it for a while although it did not pay as much as the other freight jobs.  We were running NE-1 and dropped some cars in Harlem River before continuing west to Bay Ridge with a lot of cars for the PRR.  We lost the second motor crossing the bridge but I gave the lead motor a few more notches, the amps were pretty high but not in the red and one motor pulled the entire train plus the dead motor across the bridge and on to Bay Ridge.  Yes I could have gone back and reset the second motor, you could not reset everything from the lead cab, but once we got over the bridge we could do it with just the one motor and neither of us wanted to walk back to do anything at that point in time.  Yes the later six motor freight diesels and AC diesels were up to the task too but the "Virginians" were the best ever on the New Haven for freight service, barring nothing.  They got the bargain of the century when they got them.Noel Weaver
Last edited by Noel Weaver on May 4th, 2017, 7:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 4th, 2017, 9:18 pm #23

Thanks, Noel, for the personal experience:


Can you describe the sequence of events driving a EF-4 or diesel freight over the Hell Gate from either the Bronx or Queens approaches? Did you have to gear down the motors on the approaches and at what locations?


Thanks, Ed
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 4th, 2017, 11:54 pm #24

I can't comment on the train handling since Noel did the actual handling of the throttle (and brakes) on such, but I can post what was listed in the Time Table.

Maximum Speeds:
Fremont to S.S. 3, Bungay:  40 mph
S.S. 3, Bungay to S.S. 14, Pelham Bay (No. 5 and No. 6 tracks):  45 mph
S.S. 14, Pelham Bay to S.S. 22, New Rochelle Jct.:  45 mph

Additional Speed Restrictions:
FREMONT - Fremont to a point 0.50 mile east:  30 mph
S.S. 3 - Curve 0.71 mile west to 0.68 mile west:  30 mph

NEW ROCHELLE JCT. - To or from the Harlem River Branch, S.S. 22 to 0.13 mile west:  20 mph

Additional Additional:
Rule 1816.  "Eastward freight trains approaching S.S. 3 must stop with the engine between double arm approach signal No. 7.36 and a point 800 feet west thereof and must know that air brake system is fully recharged before proceeding."  In other words, they had to do a brake test before proceeding down the grade to S.S. 3.
All freights using No. 5 and No. 6 tracks between S.S. 4, Oak Point and S.S. 14, Pelham Bay received a Medium Clear signal at the interlocking plant west of the drawbridge, meaning they had a 30 mph speed limit going through the interlocking.
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 5th, 2017, 8:56 am #25

Thanks Henry:


I assume the speed restrictions were related to track curvature, configuration or other track conditions?


Ed
Quote
Like
Share

Rick Abramson
Member
Joined: March 9th, 2003, 2:00 am

May 5th, 2017, 10:15 am #26

Ed:

Speed restrictions are predicated on track elevation, profile and track conditions. In some cases speed restrictions apply to certain types of equipment. These restrictions would be in the Special Instructions section of the employee timetable.

Rick
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 5th, 2017, 10:39 am #27

Thanks Rick,


Ed
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 5th, 2017, 9:13 pm #28

Ed, just a reminder about speed restrictions - they apply not only to the front of the train, but also the rear of the train.  Thus, for example, the speed restriction from Fremont to a point 0.50 mile east thereof, while doing to 30 mph maximum speed, the engineer couldn't crack the throttle up a notch or two until the rear of the train was past that point 0.50 miles east of Fremont.
Quote
Like
Share

nhhe52
Member
Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

May 5th, 2017, 10:02 pm #29

Henry:


I hadn't thought of that aspect. With 100+ freight cars that could taken some time waiting for the clear from the caboose.


Ed
Quote
Like
Share

Statkowski
Member
Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

May 5th, 2017, 10:36 pm #30

The maximum number of cars allowed was 125.   Why 125?  I have no idea, but that's what it was.
Quote
Like
Share