Cos Cob Power Plant Rail Deliveries

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Cos Cob Power Plant Rail Deliveries

DBrion
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:52 am

March 6th, 2017, 2:12 pm #1

When the Cos Cob Power Plant received coal
via rail was there a local switcher assigned to the plant, or were the cars set
out inside the plant by the road engine?  Was there a
particular freight train that delivered coal to the power plant?


 


Thanks in advance.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

March 6th, 2017, 4:00 pm #2

Prior to 1964, NX-3 (Stamford, New Rochelle & Return) handled deliveries of coal loads and removals of coal empties at Cos Cob power plant.  This was a Daily except Sunday train.  It appears, from the Freight Train and Package Car booklet that it picked up the coal cars at New Rochelle, dropped off there by NX-2.  NX-2 had picked up the cars at Oak Point, where they could have been dropped off by BG-1, or NH-1, or something else altogether (maybe even from the New York Central interchange).
From 1964 onward, NX-2 (Stamford, New Canaan, Oak Point, Mount Vernon & Return) handled the Cos Cob deliveries.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

March 6th, 2017, 7:27 pm #3

Sorry for my ignorance but can you explain what is meant by NX-3, NX-2? What type of motive equipment was this?

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

March 6th, 2017, 8:04 pm #4

Admitting one's ignorance is merely admitting that you don't know, but would like to know.  Us older farts are here to enlighten you.

Local freights, doing the bulk of the pickups and deliveries along the lines, were generally designated by their division.  What were originally New Haven
Division Extras (and an Extra is nothing more than a train that ran, but wasn't listed in the Time Table), identified as NDX followed by an identifying number, and Hartford Division Extras, identified as HDX followed by an identifying number, were redesignated as NX locals when the two operating divisions were merged.
Providence Division locals (PDXs) and Boston Division locals (BDXs) became BXs when those two divisions were merged.  In the later years of the railroad, there were just two divisions - New Haven Division and Boston Division.  NX trains started out with NX-1 and worked their way upward to NX-31 while the BX locals started out at BX-1 and worked their way upward to BX-27, with each local having a designated territory.

From the Arranged Freight Service Symbol Book No. 14, dated October 28, 1962 (and was a companion for Time Table No. 14) we find out the following:

NX-1:  Vacant, not used (any more).
NX-2:  Operates six days a week from Stamford to New Canaan and return, doing work on the branch.  Thence operates to Oak Point Yard, picking up cars at Port Chester West Yard and doing switching at New Rochelle.  On return from Oak Point Yard places New Rochelle cars and operates to Woodlawn and Mount Vernon as required.
NX-3:  Operates from Stamford to New Rochelle as a caboose hop unless it had perishable cars for Mamaroneck.  From New Rochelle it operated to Woodlawn and Mount Vernon as required, then ran eastward handling Larchmont, Harrison, Rye, Port Chester and Cos Cob power plant.  Westward switches Port Chester Yard
and returns to Stamford as a caboose hop.

From Book No. 20 in 1965, we find that not only is NX-1 nonexistent, but now NX-3 is as well, with NX-2 still doing the New Canaan Branch, then highballing to Oak Point Yard.  On its way eastward from Oak Point it worked the Main Line down to Woodlawn and Mount Vernon and then worked everything along the way all the way to Stamford.  NX-6, operating out of South Norwalk down to Oak Point, worked various locations along the way, and worked its way back to Stamford and South Norwalk.

Motive power?  That all depends on the timeframe.  Once upon a time the locals used EY-2 electrics, which were replaced by the DEY-7 EMD SW-1200s.  Other "locals" on the New Haven could use up to three RS-3s depending on their territory and train size.  For the West End locals a single engine was usually (but not always) enough - showing up at New Rochelle Junction heading westward with 20 cars could, at times, be problematic with the "S" curve and hill right in the middle of the junction, especially if starting up from a dead stop.

You got questions, we got answers, maybe, sometimes.
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Rick Abramson
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Joined: March 9th, 2003, 2:00 am

March 6th, 2017, 8:42 pm #5


Ed:

The power for NX-6 was usually a DEY-7 (SW1200). The 651 was the usual power for this job. It also worked the Dock Local by day and NX-6 by night for a long time. When I was a kid in the 60s (1960s) I would go down to the Dock Yard and ride the 651 during school vacations. I took this photo in 1966 of NX-6 on the Danbury Branch. The train was made up in the Dock Yard, then spotted on the middle track on the Danbury Branch in S. Norwalk. When we worked with OMI on their HO DEY-7 I asked if they could make the 651. . .and they did! It has special meaning when she runs during an op session on my layout.
Last edited by Rick Abramson on March 6th, 2017, 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Noel Weaver
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Joined: February 18th, 2003, 2:23 am

March 6th, 2017, 10:02 pm #6

The Dock Local always worked out of Danbury and at least during my time always had an RS-3 (500).  The 640 class engine at South Norwalk rotated between the South Norwalk Switcher in the daytime and NX-6 at night.  For the most part NX-6 did not work Cos Cob but did the New Canaan Branch as well as doing a run to Oak Point.  NX-2 as Henry said worked Cos Cob Power at night off track 4.  There was also a small number of yard tracks on the track three side at Cos Cob and occasionally an overflow of coal for the power plant would be placed out of the way on the WB side at Cos Cob, it was not a big deal to get them as they could cross over at SS-28.  If Cos Cob happened to be low on coal moving cars of coal to Cos Cob was a hot move.Noel Weaver
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

March 7th, 2017, 8:54 pm #7

Thanks for all the great history lessons guys!

Ed
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Tom Curtin
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Joined: March 28th, 2003, 10:44 pm

March 8th, 2017, 8:18 am #8

Statkowski wrote:
Motive power?  That all depends on the timeframe.  Once upon a time the locals used EY-2 electrics, which were replaced by the DEY-7 EMD SW-1200s.
Also --- to judge from photos --- a single unit EF-1 was often used on some locals in the period when locals had electric power
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Tom Curtin
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Joined: March 28th, 2003, 10:44 pm

March 8th, 2017, 8:23 am #9

Noel Weaver wrote:
The Dock Local always worked out of Danbury and at least during my time always had an RS-3 (500). 
Up to about 1955 (I was a little kid but I do recall this) there were some periods when the "Dock local" was assigned a DEY-3.  After that it was almost always an RS-3.
However, once in a while you could see a DERS-4 (GP-9). I remember watching one switching Shepard's in Bethel one day around 1962.  For some reason I recall the engineer telling me that day that the crews disliked the GP-9s in that service "because of the automatic transition."  I'm pretty sure that was what he said.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

March 8th, 2017, 9:05 am #10

Tom Curtin wrote:
For some reason I recall the engineer telling me that day that the crews disliked the GP-9s in that service "because of the automatic transition."  I'm pretty sure that was what he said.
That is indeed what he said.  Transition refers to the electrical switching involved with getting current from the generator to the traction motors.  In automatic transition, the switching is done automatically depending on the locomotive's speed and electrical load on the motors.  Switcher locomotives were generally wired so that all the current ran in parallel to the motors, allowing for maximum tractive effort; road-switchers and road engines used parallel and series-parallel, the first for tractive effort, the second for speed.  In Alco locomotives, the engineer had to manually shift from parallel (which allowed for maximum tractive effort) to series (which allowed for maximum speed).  In EMD locomotives the transition was done automatically, sometimes when it wasn't desired when dealing with a long cut of cars, or a hill, or something.   
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