Cos Cob Power Plant Rail Deliveries

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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

December 3rd, 2017, 4:56 pm #21

"Run of mine" and "Lump" coal would have been the same thing.  It's coal that had not been graded by size, or crushed.  Some of it was big lumps, some of it was nearly dust.  Purchased in such a condition, it cost less since there was less processing of it to do by the coal company.  Straight from the mine into the hopper cars.

For HO scale, you might want the largest size possible, perhaps even S scale or O scale stuff mixed in to give it some variety.

Once upon a time, back in the olden days, coal was shipped raw, without any coating, and it left a trail of coal dust wherever the cars ran.  Nowadays the bituminous coal is crushed and coated (with some form of light oil) before it leaves the processing plant.  It holds together well and none of it blows off the cars as the trains go by.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

December 3rd, 2017, 6:05 pm #22

Statkowski wrote: "Run of mine" and "Lump" coal would have been the same thing.  It's coal that had not been graded by size, or crushed.  Some of it was big lumps, some of it was nearly dust.  Purchased in such a condition, it cost less since there was less processing of it to do by the coal company.  Straight from the mine into the hopper cars.

For HO scale, you might want the largest size possible, perhaps even S scale or O scale stuff mixed in to give it some variety.

Once upon a time, back in the olden days, coal was shipped raw, without any coating, and it left a trail of coal dust wherever the cars ran.  Nowadays the bituminous coal is crushed and coated (with some form of light oil) before it leaves the processing plant.  It holds together well and none of it blows off the cars as the trains go by.
Thanks Henry:

Sounds like I”ll need a mix of sizes for the yard pile, some slack to strew along the tracks and around the yard roadways, and perhaps some ash too as that was the end product that was dumped into the river for land fill.

An aside that I found amusing is that in a 1907 article about the Power Plant it was noted that Green boilers were used.  I said to myself, no way the NY,NH&H was thinking “Green” in 1907 when there was little if any corporate concern for the environment.
 
Turns out the author was not using the term Green in the current sense of the word, renewable energy and/or environmentally responsible.
 
The first successful boiler economizer design was used to increase the steam-raising efficiency of the boilers of stationary steam engines. It was patented by Edward Green in 1845, and since then has been known as Green's economizer.    He didn’t know it but Mr. Green was certainly being environmentally responsible by making boilers more efficient and burning less coal and he made money while doing it.  Way ahead of his time.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

December 3rd, 2017, 7:40 pm #23

nhhe52 wrote:The first successful boiler economizer design was used to increase the steam-raising efficiency of the boilers of stationary steam engines. It was patented by Edward Green in 1845, and since then has been known as Green's economizer.    He didn’t know it but Mr. Green was certainly being environmentally responsible by making boilers more efficient and burning less coal and he made money while doing it.  Way ahead of his time.
According to Wikipedia, "Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door" is a phrase attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson in the late nineteenth century although that is paraphrasing what he actually said.

In any case, Mr. Green built a better boiler.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

January 23rd, 2018, 11:26 am #24

In an article about the Cos Cob power plant coal delivery systems, it states that coal hoppers delivered to the coal crusher trestle were winched to over the crusher hopper, not placed by a switcher.  Anyone here have knoweldge of what type of winch was used and how is was powered?

TIA,

Ed
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 23rd, 2018, 11:54 am #25

Winching of cars utilized an electrically powered winch and a long piece of wire rope with a hook on the end, not unlike what you see today on the front of an off-road enthusiast's Jeep (only bigger).

Prior to today's almost exclusive use of unit coal trains, including running an entire train through a flood loader, coal cars at the assorted mines along the line were spotted to one side of the loading bunker, and would be filled one at a time.  It wouldn't be cost effective to maintain an on-hand switcher at such facilities, so the coal operators would hook the cable to the car, pop the brakes, pull it forward to its desired location, set the brakes and unhook the cable.  For the next car, and the one after that, et cetera, ad infinitum, ad nauseam (and a few other Latin words and phrases thrown in), the process was repeated.  Empties on one side of the loader, loads on the other, no locomotive and crew required.

What was done at the car's origin was done, in Cos Cob's case, also at the destination.

Need to move a car nowadays?  A rough terrain forklift will do the job adequately.  Back in the day, say at a freight house where the car just had to be moved a matter of feet, a hand-operated car creeper would do the job.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

January 23rd, 2018, 11:59 am #26

Great, thanks Henry:

Just the info I was looking for.  Something like this should work then?

Ed
s-l200.jpg
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 23rd, 2018, 12:08 pm #27

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  If you're happy with it, then it'll do.  The top hook would be more appropriate.

The wire rope, however, should be black, not rusted.  The wire rope was greased with a graphite grease to stop it from rusting and keep it more or less flexible (rust, in addition to weakening it, would also hamper its flexibility).
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

January 23rd, 2018, 12:11 pm #28

Statkowski wrote: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  If you're happy with it, then it'll do.  The top hook would be more appropriate.

The wire rope, however, should be black, not rusted.  The wire rope was greased with a graphite grease to stop it from rusting and keep it more or less flexible (rust, in addition to weakening it, would also hamper its flexibility).
One of these then would be more appropriate?
s-l200 (1).jpg
s-l200 (2).jpg
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 23rd, 2018, 2:21 pm #29

Top one looks more like a winch.  Bottom one looks more like a windlass.  Top one needs a motor to go with it.

Something with an industrial look, greasy, grungy, well used.
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

January 23rd, 2018, 2:26 pm #30

Statkowski wrote: Top one looks more like a winch.  Bottom one looks more like a windlass.  Top one needs a motor to go with it.

Something with an industrial look, greasy, grungy, well used.
Thanks again,

Ed
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