Cos Cob Power Plant Rail Deliveries

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
Statkowski
Member
Joined: 05 Mar 2003, 09:39

03 Dec 2017, 21:56 #21

"Run of mine" and "Lump" coal would have been the same thing.  It's coal that had not been graded by size, or crushed.  Some of it was big lumps, some of it was nearly dust.  Purchased in such a condition, it cost less since there was less processing of it to do by the coal company.  Straight from the mine into the hopper cars.

For HO scale, you might want the largest size possible, perhaps even S scale or O scale stuff mixed in to give it some variety.

Once upon a time, back in the olden days, coal was shipped raw, without any coating, and it left a trail of coal dust wherever the cars ran.  Nowadays the bituminous coal is crushed and coated (with some form of light oil) before it leaves the processing plant.  It holds together well and none of it blows off the cars as the trains go by.
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

03 Dec 2017, 23:05 #22

Statkowski wrote: "Run of mine" and "Lump" coal would have been the same thing.  It's coal that had not been graded by size, or crushed.  Some of it was big lumps, some of it was nearly dust.  Purchased in such a condition, it cost less since there was less processing of it to do by the coal company.  Straight from the mine into the hopper cars.

For HO scale, you might want the largest size possible, perhaps even S scale or O scale stuff mixed in to give it some variety.

Once upon a time, back in the olden days, coal was shipped raw, without any coating, and it left a trail of coal dust wherever the cars ran.  Nowadays the bituminous coal is crushed and coated (with some form of light oil) before it leaves the processing plant.  It holds together well and none of it blows off the cars as the trains go by.
Thanks Henry:

Sounds like I”ll need a mix of sizes for the yard pile, some slack to strew along the tracks and around the yard roadways, and perhaps some ash too as that was the end product that was dumped into the river for land fill.

An aside that I found amusing is that in a 1907 article about the Power Plant it was noted that Green boilers were used.  I said to myself, no way the NY,NH&H was thinking “Green” in 1907 when there was little if any corporate concern for the environment.
 
Turns out the author was not using the term Green in the current sense of the word, renewable energy and/or environmentally responsible.
 
The first successful boiler economizer design was used to increase the steam-raising efficiency of the boilers of stationary steam engines. It was patented by Edward Green in 1845, and since then has been known as Green's economizer.    He didn’t know it but Mr. Green was certainly being environmentally responsible by making boilers more efficient and burning less coal and he made money while doing it.  Way ahead of his time.
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Statkowski
Member
Joined: 05 Mar 2003, 09:39

04 Dec 2017, 00:40 #23

nhhe52 wrote:The first successful boiler economizer design was used to increase the steam-raising efficiency of the boilers of stationary steam engines. It was patented by Edward Green in 1845, and since then has been known as Green's economizer.    He didn’t know it but Mr. Green was certainly being environmentally responsible by making boilers more efficient and burning less coal and he made money while doing it.  Way ahead of his time.
According to Wikipedia, "Build a better mousetrap, and the world will beat a path to your door" is a phrase attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson in the late nineteenth century although that is paraphrasing what he actually said.

In any case, Mr. Green built a better boiler.
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