Cos Cob Power Plant Rail Deliveries

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
DBrion
Member
Joined: 21 Jun 2006, 05:52

08 Mar 2017, 14:45 #11

Mr. Statkowski,
Your explanation of transition is the best I've ever seen.  Clear and concise.  Thanks for describing it in layman's terms.
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Rick Abramson
Member
Joined: 09 Mar 2003, 07:00

08 Mar 2017, 16:52 #12

Some switchers and road engines (depending on the RR) had a switch to go from yard to road.
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Noel Weaver
Member
Joined: 18 Feb 2003, 07:23

11 Mar 2017, 05:12 #13

The big problem with a GP-9 on a yard job was the slow loading. It had nothing to do with transition which would not normally occur untill the speed was higher than what would be in the yard. The 640-s had a toggle switch labelled "road/yard which determined the acceleration rate and for most operation it was yard even if on a local freight. Transition was automatic although it could be held in series. On moar engines with automatic transition backward transition was also automatic but like most E units backward transition could only be accomplished by shutting off the throttle after the speed was reduced to less than the first step of transition. Controls of this nature in most cases were the option of the railroad company that ordered the locomotive new from the builder.
Noel Weaver
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Marcus Ruef
Member
Joined: 03 Feb 2008, 03:47

15 Mar 2017, 02:31 #14

A friend of mine has a framed sheet taken out of one of the East Class hump towers showing class yard track assignments, apparently close to the end of humping operations there, which I believe ended in the late seventies. One of the tracks is labeled "Company Coal," which must have been for the power plant. I seem to remember that in the seventies, NX-2 handled the coal when it was home terminaled at East Bridgeport, and that BG-1 (or WNCH ) fed East Bridgeport westbound. Its been a long time.
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danahu
Member
Joined: 08 Jan 2005, 04:17

16 Mar 2017, 02:21 #15

Right you are, Marcus.  As a teenager, I rode with Engineer Joe (?) and Conductor Roger Bauer on NX-2 several times during the summers of 1978 and 1979, powered by ex-NH DEY-7s (SW-1200s), and got to drill the power plant with them.   I believe the loaded and empty hoppers that were kept on the three track stub yard next to Indian Field road west of the station were, at that time under Conrail, dropped and picked up by the road job out of Oak Point , as I don't remember NX-2 ever dropping loads or taking the empties, but I could be mistaken.  Today, the only evidence that this activity ever happened are the bridge abutments that carried the track into the power plant.  By the late 70s, that power plant was an absolute anachronism - an operating museum, you could say - but it kept the RR rolling, "P2 restrictions" and all - LOL! - Dana H.
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Marcus Ruef
Member
Joined: 03 Feb 2008, 03:47

17 Mar 2017, 01:38 #16

That would have been Joe DiCuffa, who worked that job for many, many years. I worked that job on an occasional basis with Roger Bauer many times. He was one of the "New York Freight" trainmen who had prior rights to all of those local freight assignments. What a great bunch of characters...Ed Tierney, Bobby Eban, John Fitzgerald, Andy Wick, Joe Burke, to name but a few...many twelve hour nights that went by like five minutes because those men were professional railroaders who were good natured, self effacing and entertaining. In 1981 and 1982, during the run-up to split day on 1/1/83, people in engine service started placing themselves away from those freight jobs in anticipation of the split, and junior men like me could work those jobs more. I had a lot of fun then working those various locals, as well as BG-1/GB-2, the last thru freight between Cedar Hill and Oak Point, which was formally called WNCH1, but everyone still called it BG-1. The Shore Line between New Haven and New Rochelle is not a flat railroad, but very much a washboard (not to be confused with the Pullman Standard MUs), and a long freight train can be very frightening to an engineer that doesn't know the topography very well. In several places, an advance approach signal that would not cause a passenger engineer any alarm would mean you had to "take it all" on a freight train, and just let it stop where it came to rest. Once you commit the grade profile to memory, which I did early on, its a snap. Its amazing the flood of wonderful memories that can be triggered by the mention of a single name from the past. Thanks for reminding me of Roger.
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danahu
Member
Joined: 08 Jan 2005, 04:17

18 Mar 2017, 00:19 #17

"What a great bunch of characters...Ed Tierney, Bobby Eban, John Fitzgerald, Andy Wick, Joe Burke, to name but a few...many twelve hour nights that went by like five minutes because those men were professional railroaders who were good natured, self effacing and entertaining." 
Marcus:  You're welcome.  I believe those pleasant encounters that many of us on this forum had with that "great bunch of characters" throughout all parts of the system is the reason why we so fervently hold on to our memories of the NH.  It's personal encounters from our past like these that breathe life into equipment, structures, r-o-w, pictures, and other memorabilia, to remind us of "what once was", and giving those artifacts context.  As a volunteer Conductor on the Naugatuck RR, I feel the spirit of these railroaders every time I invite a youngster into the cab or help boost them into the cupola of the hack, patiently answering all of the goofy questions that a kid can have about trains - just like I had some fifty years ago - and hopefully leaving them with nice memories of their visit to the railroad much as I had.   I'm glad you had a chance to honor these mens' legacy by going on to a fine professional railroad career of your own.   In the spirit of St. Paddy's, a hearty "Slainte'" to New Haven men living and passed, and to today's railroaders who have the privilege of riding "their father's magic carpets made of steel." - Dana H.
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Marcus Ruef
Member
Joined: 03 Feb 2008, 03:47

18 Mar 2017, 02:24 #18

Dana, thanks for your kind words. It has been an interesting career and life, and I'm still working (in Chicago now) after nearly 44 years in the rail industry! I'm really glad to see that you're involved with the Naugatuck group, and very gratified by your comment about "...giving those artifacts context." Obviously, you understand what the rail preservation community must do to become and stay relevant. Since your triggering of my old memories, I realize that it was John Fitzimmons, not Fitzgerald, who was one of the old NY Freight guys. I also recalled a Shore Line engineer from New London named Eddie May, who was the one who taught me how to run a through freight from Cedar Hill to Oak Point, and motivated me to commit the profile to memory.
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

18 Mar 2017, 02:38 #19

Mr. Reuf mentioned several railroaders by name and how they made a shift both enjoyable and seem like it took no time all. Mr. Dana H. recalling his childhood questions and memories during the questioning by today's youth on the Naugatuck RR. Mr. Drummond's startled response when he first encountered an EF-3 that silently crept upon him while collecting plastic trickets and the smiling wave of the fireman and a railroader in the hack. Plus so many other memories shared in these threads and in Shoreliner, bring the warm, personal, and good hearted nature of the New Haven's railroaders to life in the minds of us who only experienced a wave from a RS-3 while at the right-of-way along the Valley Line. I'm sure that holds true for those who hadn't any New Haven RR experiences at all because of their ages. Everytime I read about a specific railroader by name, and acts like picking up the coal fragments below the stove, saving the stubby pencils, the chicken coop, and the sleep overs in SS 7, they come alive again in my mind. I have no idea what most of them looked like, but I see a person in the neat dress clothes of a tower operator or the clean work clothes with hat of a trainman. In my mind's tv, they act out again and again what I read. The NHRHTA members bring a living history to the Shoreliner and this Forum, and keep those remarkable railroaders of the New Haven alive forever. Thanks for sharing your memories of these fine railroaders, and please never stop sharing them. Thank you for listening.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.   member#3967
3668 Lone Valley Road
Calvert City, Kentucky 42029-8322
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr. member #3967
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

03 Dec 2017, 21:07 #20

I see from another post from Mr. Statkowski that NH steam locomotive operations used Run-of-Mine sized coal.   

“When operating steam locomotives, the New Haven received "run-of-mine" coal mostly from West Virginia.”

I know from the Electric Railway Journal, January 17, 1920, that “run-of-mine” or “mine-run” sized coal was also the size coal delivered by barge and rail to the Cos Cob Power Plant.  The rail and barge deliveries to the plant were sent to crushers before burning.

What simulated loose HO scale coal product would best represent for mine-run sized coal?
I’m using Accurail coal hopper loads so a simulated coal product that simulates that size is a consideration as well.

TIA,

Ed
Last edited by nhhe52 on 03 Dec 2017, 22:30, edited 2 times in total.
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