Canaan Fan Trip?

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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

January 10th, 2018, 4:59 pm #11

    Not being familiar with who the Nimby family was, I looked it up and found out they weren't a family, but people who didn’t want any or a certain type of development in their area. I also found an interesting paper titled Why Are There NIMBYs? by William A. Fischel, a Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College published in January 2000, and part of his forthcoming book Land Economics (2001). (If you want to read the paper, it is at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~wfischel/Papers/00-04.PDF. I don't know if the book was published for sure. I took the information from the title page.) Here is the paper’s abstract: “An owner-occupied home is an unusual asset because it cannot be diversified among locations and because it is the only sizable asset that most owners possess. Among the uninsured risks of homeownership is devaluation by nearby changes in land use. Opponents of land-use change are called NIMBYs (“Not In My Back Yard”). This article submits that NIMBYism is a rational response to the uninsured risks of homeownership. It explores to the possibilities and drawbacks of providing an insurance market to cover such risks. It concludes that some progress is being made towards developing such markets.”
    Prof. Fischel opens with, “NIMBYs sometimes appear to be irrational in their opposition to projects in the sense that they express far-fetched anxieties or doggedly fight projects whose expected neighborhood effects seem small or even benign. I submit in this note that such anxieties might not be irrational if we consider that most NIMBYs are homeowners, and that homeowners cannot insure their major (and often only) asset against devaluation by neighborhood effects. NIMBYism might better be viewed as a risk-averse strategy. I conclude with a few notes about how an insurance market might be developed to head off these concerns, if indeed they should be allayed at all.”
    I found the paper an interesting read, and I wouldn’t purchase home-value insurance policy or rider even after reading the paper. Thanks Mr. Beaujon for introducing me to a new term and the opportunity to understand why people become a Nimby.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.   member #3967
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 10th, 2018, 5:32 pm #12

Following the abandonment of the line between New Milford and Canaan, Connecticut, the tracks, still in place, slowly rusted.  Upon abandonment the right of way became the property of the State of Connecticut.  Then it was proposed that the line be reactivated by the Housatonic Railroad and, according to the local newspapers, you would have sworn it was the end of life as we know it, a plague beset on the local residents by an evil corporation, noise, pollution, a risk to unsupervised children, etc., etc.  The NIMBYs lost their battle, yet everyone is still here, alive and relatively well.

We had a similar battle happen in Indiana, Pennsylvania when a power plant to the south of town desired to receive coal shipments by rail over an inactive BR&P/B&O/CSX right of way (not abandoned, but rather just sitting idle for a few years).  Traffic getting delayed, fire trucks, ambulances and police cars not being able to get from one side of town to the other if a slow moving coal train was coming through, etc., etc.  The comments from the citizens in the local newspaper were hysterical.  Yet today, or maybe every other day, a coal train comes through in the middle of the night, and life goes on.

Richard, you've never heard of NIMBYs?  My, my, you have led a sheltered life.
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joemato
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Joined: September 9th, 2003, 1:57 pm

January 10th, 2018, 7:42 pm #13

The best rail fan trip was held in July 1968 when Peter Maclachlan ran the steam 2-8-0 #97 from Danbury to Canaan for the Canaan railroad days with rented NH coaches. They did a series of runs and had a last party before the Penn Central fiasco played out. 
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joemato
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Joined: September 9th, 2003, 1:57 pm

January 10th, 2018, 7:58 pm #14

Probably the best fan trip of the later New Haven time was the steam trip with #97 from Danbury to Canaan for the Canaan railroad days which ran in July 1968 with Peter Maclachlan
as engineer and some rented New Haven coaches in back. They did a series of runs from Canaan and was a last hurrah of the New Haven before the darkness of Penn Central came
to attempt to kill all railroad activity in the region. They did come close to doing that.
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kcur8722
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Joined: March 30th, 2014, 2:59 pm

January 10th, 2018, 8:49 pm #15

I rode with my mother in one of those New Haven coaches.  I was 13 years old & have fond & enjoyable memories of the ride.  We went down to Maltby's siding near Falls Village, did a runaround & came back to Canaan.  Very few empty seats, if there were any.
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