bridgeport,ct

An open forum to discuss all aspects of the New Haven Railroad.
rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

19 Aug 2017, 08:07 #31

Mr. Statkowski. I spend sometimes as much as 16 to 20 hours a day researching various topics, and when I come across something I hadn't heard of before I have to pause and read that one then continue. So I really appreciate reading about seven new topics while trying to find out the who, when, and where of That Film. I have had to reply on several occassion that my tongue was pushing out my cheek while writing some responses on several threads. I had to share my ignorance on someone producing a parody of "The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds" concerning the McGinnis era, and that I took Mr. Abramson's post at first as the first humor of his I recalled on the Forum strengthened by your deadpan response. It was the team action, with you as the straight man, that nailed me. Loved it. Only experiencing the New Haven as a passenger from Meriden to Hartford to go on the Ranger Andy Show I think in 1959, my disappointment when my father finally to me to work on a Saturday and there were no trains just a building in '58 or '59 (he was an engineer), seeing the occasional train on the Valley Branch when I walked the right-of-way from what I now know was the North Cromwell Station (thanks to the Forum) to downtown Cromwell where the freighthouse still stood, and seeing the string of reefers (I think at Wethersfield) and the Turbo Train in a yard somewhere in Hartford between '68 and '71 (when I received an invitation to work for the Army) while driving along I-91, I learn so much here on the Forum, especially from the railroaders themselves. Plus Mr. Abramson's outstanding layout with the two samples of Bridgeport posted here (drifting back) along with the modeling works and layouts of all the other contributors, makes me check the Forum about ten or so times a day for anything new that was posted.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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pnorkawich
Member
Joined: 17 Aug 2017, 12:51

23 Aug 2017, 04:42 #32

rsullivan wrote:Mr. Statkowski. I spend sometimes as much as 16 to 20 hours a day researching various topics, and when I come across something I hadn't heard of before I have to pause and read that one then continue. So I really appreciate reading about seven new topics while trying to find out the who, when, and where of That Film. I have had to reply on several occassion that my tongue was pushing out my cheek while writing some responses on several threads. I had to share my ignorance on someone producing a parody of "The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds" concerning the McGinnis era, and that I took Mr. Abramson's post at first as the first humor of his I recalled on the Forum strengthened by your deadpan response. It was the team action, with you as the straight man, that nailed me. Loved it. Only experiencing the New Haven as a passenger from Meriden to Hartford to go on the Ranger Andy Show I think in 1959, my disappointment when my father finally to me to work on a Saturday and there were no trains just a building in '58 or '59 (he was an engineer), seeing the occasional train on the Valley Branch when I walked the right-of-way from what I now know was the North Cromwell Station (thanks to the Forum) to downtown Cromwell where the freighthouse still stood, and seeing the string of reefers (I think at Wethersfield) and the Turbo Train in a yard somewhere in Hartford between '68 and '71 (when I received an invitation to work for the Army) while driving along I-91, I learn so much here on the Forum, especially from the railroaders themselves. Plus Mr. Abramson's outstanding layout with the two samples of Bridgeport posted here (drifting back) along with the modeling works and layouts of all the other contributors, makes me check the Forum about ten or so times a day for anything new that was posted.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Mr Statkowski, Mr Sullivan, I was doing some research on the Cedar Hill Yard and ran across an interesting post on freight. Specifically the delivery of freight along the CT shoreline including the Bridgeport sidings, spurs and yards. Here's the excerpt:

Bridgeport – west of SS-55 (Burr Road) – Jenkins Valves, McKessons, Handy and Harman, Bullard – pipe and valves, chemicals and drugs, electrical equipment and parts, machines and tools.

Bridgeport – Hole track in Railroad Avenue – lumber, building materials, oil and mixed freight,

Bridgeport – Lower Yard – lumber, coal and mixed freight,

North Bridgeport (Old Berkshire) brass products, sand and mixed freight,

East Bridgeport – yard – mixed freight.

Stratford – building materials, lumber, food stuffs and coal.

https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/cedar ... new-haven/

If anyone can offer some clarification on the tracks that served West End Lumber, that would be great. Thanks.

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TomCurtin
Member
Joined: 13 Jul 2017, 14:13

23 Aug 2017, 12:26 #33

rsullivan wrote: Mr. Curtin. Remington Rand did make M1911 45 caliber pistols during World War II.
Not  surprising to me to hear of this.  Any number
of U. S. manufacturing companies got into the munitions business in WW II 
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

23 Aug 2017, 14:03 #34

Mr. Prorkawich. Currently, West End Lumber Company is located at 100 Washburn Street in Bridgeport, and sits between Washburn and Railroad Avenue. Looking at the satellite photo of the property today, it still extends to Railroad Avenue. It also looks like Railroad Avenue is divided by the elevated shore line with the eastbound Railroad Avenue against the West End Lumber Company property line. There are no evidence of railroad tracks in the pavement either side of Railroad Avenue or in the West End Lumber Company property now. If the West End Lumber Company hasn't moved, and based on it adjoining Railroad Avenue on the southside of the elevated tracks, my guess would be the Hole track in Railroad Avenue. Now is the time for a railroader that actually worked a train in Bridgeport to say if I'm right or wrong.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Last edited by rsullivan on 23 Aug 2017, 15:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Richard Abramson
Member
Joined: 04 Aug 2017, 21:23

23 Aug 2017, 15:06 #35

Ironically, most of the lumber for my benchwork came from West End Lumber.
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pnorkawich
Member
Joined: 17 Aug 2017, 12:51

23 Aug 2017, 17:19 #36

Thank you Mr Sullivan, the track was definitely from the hole as I now understand it. The track had a grade downward from the main along Railroad Avenue on the southern edge. The track curved around the Lumber yard and headed towards Eastern Bag and Paper, continuing ultimately to Sikorsky Aircraft along South Avenue.

Peter Norkawich
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DBrion
Member
Joined: 21 Jun 2006, 05:52

23 Aug 2017, 18:14 #37

Ironically, small world indeed.  Prior to my firm's relocation from the NE to the SE I used to purchase products and materials from Jenkins and Eastern Bag & Paper.

During my time of roaming around Bridgeport's industrial trackage many times I walked the descending westbound grade from just west of the depot down to grade on Water St., and on a few occasions walked through the under pass from the westbound lead to the Lower Yard.  What intrigued me was that these grades from the elevated ROW to the Lower Yard carried evidence of catenary (long since removed).  Does anyone have any information on the electric locomotives that might have delivered or switched freight to the Lower Yard?
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Statkowski
Member
Joined: 05 Mar 2003, 09:39

24 Aug 2017, 01:10 #38

When in doubt, the valuation maps are always a good place to start.
Map
This one shows the stretch between Wordin and Iranistan Avenues, which is where West End Lumber is located:
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rsullivan
Member
Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

24 Aug 2017, 07:34 #39

Thanks Mr. Statkowski for the link. This property valuation map shows that on June 30, 1915, Vicent Coal Company was located where West End Lumber currently sits, and Harbor Street has disappeared into the West End Lumber Company's property with no evidence of its existence on the satellite photo. West End Lumber probably used the switch leading to Vicent Coal after taking over the property. 
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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Frank R
Member
Joined: 21 Feb 2007, 09:33

25 Aug 2017, 19:46 #40

I can comment some on the "Lower Yard" having worked at the power plant that was built on it for ~40 years.  
It was on the south side of "Jenkins Curve," the ballpark is on the north side and covers all the the Jenkins Valve Company's footprint (and also 3 blocks of Main Street).
When the plant began generating power in 1957, it used coal delivered by the railroad until 1968.  They built a small yard on the property where they stored the cars that brought coal from the Kentucky/West Virginia area.  In the beginning, the railroad still used a part of the lower yard for a while (UI did not initially purchase the whole thing). They stopped burning that coal in the 2 smaller units in 1968, then started burning a different coal in the larger unit in 1984 that was delivered by barge. That initially came from a different area of Kentucky, but later due to new enviro rules, there were only two types of coal they could use to comply. Their choices were the Powder River Basin in Wyoming, or Indonesia (as in on the other side of the world).  They had to go with Indonesia because the transport costs made the Wyoming coal too expensive.  Go figure - draw your own conclusions. 
The 50 ton GE locomotive UI used for moving the coal around was purchased new in '56 - '57, it was donated to the Berkshire Scenic Railway, where I'm pretty sure it still resides.
They used a "fishbelly" flat car as a spacer between the loco and the hopper cars to isolate the loco from the vibrations of the car shaker, it was purchased secondhand from the NHHR and was later donated to the Danbury Railroad Museum. It is still there, they haven't restored it, but it's deteriorating pretty fast. The original NH car number is almost visible, but the renumbered car number (beginning with a "T" is very visible), I assume it was last used in a work train. (I personally handled that transaction to the museum)
I have a few photos of the small yard they built and also some of the very first coal delivery, if anyone is interested, I'll post them. I wasn't there during the railroad years, but did a lot of research on the history during my time there.
Interesting note: There was a small RR building that was annexed to the original roundhouse and survived into the 21st century. It had to be demolished during my time there, it's foundation had railroad tracks used as rebar.  The contractor doing the demo was not a happy camper.
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