Berkshire line "What If"

sauced2007
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Joined: March 21st, 2018, 2:15 pm

April 5th, 2018, 12:43 pm #1

 I am in the initial phases of a layout design and I was looking for some opinions. The What If is what if rail was extended from North Adams Ma to Bennington, running through Pownal. Looking at things from a map perspective how would that have changed things? I'm planning my layout by that what if and how it might have affected traffic flow in the area. 
 I worked for the New England Central for a while out of Palmer and Brattleboro and I was struck by the thought that a few miles of rail between Bennington and North Adams would have given that corridor of track roughly the same profile as the old CV, mainly Canada to CT. I know it would require the line from Burlington to Alburg VT to stay intact but it is a what if idea. Your thoughts gentlemen, please.
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DBrion
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:52 am

April 5th, 2018, 1:23 pm #2

I think its a great idea.  In fact, you might even incorporate winter & spring excursion ski trains into Bromley, VT.  Beautiful area in lower VT!    🚂
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sauced2007
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Joined: March 21st, 2018, 2:15 pm

April 5th, 2018, 2:11 pm #3

DBrion wrote: I think its a great idea.  In fact, you might even incorporate winter & spring excursion ski trains into Bromley, VT.  Beautiful area in lower VT!    🚂
My thoughts are a somewhat current time but a train like that would be feasible. I am somewhat settled on the Rising through Lenox area. The layout will be mix of single deck and double deck in a 17x24' room. My thinking is that with the addition of that few mile piece of rail between Bennington and North Adams the rail line would take on run thru freights instead of branch type service. Also in my theory the Rutland was picked up after their issues since the line was connected, maybe saving the Berkshire line from becoming Penn Central thus becoming it's own regional rr. 
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

April 5th, 2018, 4:25 pm #4

Mr. Sauced2007. I looked at the map of Vermont, and I think it would work great following and replacing the US 7 highway. That would touch each of the cities you mentioned originally, and can have an interchange track with the Rutland Railroad at Rutland. Here is a 2015 Vermont Railway Map from: http://www.vermontbiz.com/news/july/rut ... -plan-2015.
vermont_rail_map_2015-600x797.png
2015 Vermont Railway Map
2015 Vermont Railway Map
      As the map shows, the Vermont Railway seems to follow the route I mentioned from a review of a regular map of Vermont. I think it will be a fun railroad with lots of interchange possibilities. Good luck with it.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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sauced2007
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Joined: March 21st, 2018, 2:15 pm

April 5th, 2018, 5:07 pm #5

rsullivan wrote:Thanks. I printed a copy of both the Vermont Railway system map and the Housatonic Railway system map and taped them together where they overlapped. They both had stretches of other lines so the two fit together perfectly. I'm working on traffic now. Anyone have ideas for types of run thru traffic from Canada to Ct and NY in say, the 70's-80's? 
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

April 5th, 2018, 5:57 pm #6

Consider the Housatonic line continuing through Pittsfield and operating over the Pittsfield & North Adams line, from which it could utilize the Fitchburg RR's tunnel to get to the Rutland connection.  Always gotta figure in the geography when planning a rail line, and the existing lines probably used the only reasonable route available.
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Joined: June 13th, 2003, 4:27 pm

April 5th, 2018, 6:10 pm #7

I rarely take issue with any of the thoughtful comments you offer up, Mr. Sullivan. However, you have sent chills through this old body of mine with your suggestion of   "...replacing US 7 highway..." This, sir, is hallowed ground of which you speak, one of the few major roads that has not been "interstate-ized" (though many have tried) over the past decades, and long may it last. I may well never travel its glorious miles again, but memories linger forever. 

Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario

#0668
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sauced2007
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Joined: March 21st, 2018, 2:15 pm

April 5th, 2018, 6:19 pm #8

That’s sort of the evolving plan. Even though I’m modeling existing track due to having worked for several real roads I like to be somewhat based in something that makes sense. I need it to “ would have worked “ if it really was.
I did read something somewhere that there was a plan to connect North Adams and Bennington in real life somewhere around the beginning of the 1900’s but funding and politics stopped it from happening.
It’s amazing how many lines were affected by a wrong or poorly timed decision to their detriment. I’ve passed numerous remnants of old lines that were the result of that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

April 5th, 2018, 6:28 pm #9

sauced2007 wrote: It’s amazing how many lines were affected by a wrong or poorly timed decision to their detriment. I’ve passed numerous remnants of old lines that were the result of that. 
When the New Haven's J. P. Morgan gave the PRR and NYC what for and why, and arrived at the Corsair Agreement, thus ended the NYC's plans for a backdoor route to Pittsburgh over the line near my house out here in Western Pennsylvania.  The entire routing was surveyed, and then suddenly dropped.  And if one followed the Engineering Department map instead of the Operating Department's map, one would discover one branch suddenly became a branch of a different name after passing over a junction that ended up not being a junction.

Not unlike the joint NH/B&M backdoor inland route to Boston that was partially built and then was abandoned.
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

April 5th, 2018, 10:59 pm #10

     Mr. Derek. Sorry to have upset you. Those old postal routes were the backbone of the early lines of communication, and are still necessary connectors throughout most of the rural US. The same probably holds true north of the 49th parallel. I was just attempting to point out a route on the map survey using a road map of Vermont. I was at first surprised that the Vermont Railway follows much of the same route as US 7. Then I remembered that roads and railroads tended to follow the lay of the land for route determinations.
     Mr. Sauced2007. One thing you could add for the traffic are numerous stops to drop off Canadian maple syrup and pick up Vermont maple syrup for distribution throughout the world. The reason to drop off Canadian maple syrup is the old adage that "the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence." Using the same illogic, the Vermonters might feel the Canadian maple syrup was better than theirs, so they wanted shipments brought in to fuel their taste buds.
Richard (short form) #3967
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