Joined: September 26th, 2006, 9:59 pm

February 9th, 2018, 11:36 am #11

NewHavenGeek wrote:
TomCurtin wrote:
NewHavenGeek wrote:

I believe that in addition to the normal services, they were partially used as club cars. Also they were normally only on the long range/name trains the NH ran. if the car you speak of is the only "parlor" on the train, then you should not be running the lightweight. I'd recommend either running a straight baggage in it's place or a heavyweight combine.
What exactly do you mean by "Club cars?"  I ask because this term had multiple meanings in passenget trains
on the NEW HAVEN they were kinds like toned down parlor cars, but you paid a monthly fee (usually $10) to use the car in addition to a slightly reduced ticket price. But apart from that they were just another first class car.
On the railroads generally, a club car was a car that had cocktail lounge service.   The use of term was railroad specific.  Browse an Officil Guide of the 50's and you will see club-coach, parlor-club, club-lounge, club car service and others.

The monthly fee type club car was a commuter railroad phenomenon.  These clubs were run by commuter groups who chartered a daily car, usually from staitons with a journey fo 45 minutes or more.  NH and NYC each had several.
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Statkowski
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 4:39 am

February 9th, 2018, 11:38 am #12

Derek wrote, "But I have noted a number of consists in which these cars were the sole parlour conveyance. Of what possible use would those 11 lounge seats serve?"

Thinking about it, what was really needed on the train was 14 Parlor Car seats.  That was it.  The lounge seats merely went along with the needed seats.  Something had to take up the unneeded space, and a dance floor was out of the question.
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Joined: September 26th, 2006, 9:59 pm

February 9th, 2018, 12:06 pm #13

Derek Thompson wrote: I have a question, the answer to which may have been lost to the winds of time.

The above-captioned cars were multi-purpose, what with 14 parlor chairs, a drawing room, 2 day roomettes and 11 lounge seats, with buffet, as well as a badge section. I can understand the rationale for  having the lounge seats in consists with regular parlor cars as well as the combines. But I have noted a number of consists in which these cars were the sole parlour conveyance. Of what possible use would those 11 lounge seats serve? One would hardly expect any of the 14 parlor car patrons to walk a few feet to sit in the lounge chairs. And those in the private accommodations chose privacy for a reason. Were the lounge seats sold as parlor chairs? Or were coach passengers permitted to enter into the exalted sanctum for a cold one?

My curiosity has been piqued. Responses welcomed and appreciated.


Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario 

NHRHTA # 0668
I rode between New York and Boston many times in my college student days in the late 50's.  It was quite clear to us that we were not welcome to go into the parlor lounge for a drink.  We would have been noticed by our casual dress.  A man in a coat and tie on a train with two parlor cars would not have been noticed as a strange in the lounge car - provided he wasn't there when the conductor was collecting tickets.  The access difficulty would have been going from the head coach into a parlor car.  Unless the porter was occupied, he'd have been told that coach passengers were not allowed. 
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Joined: September 26th, 2006, 9:59 pm

February 9th, 2018, 12:12 pm #14

Derek Thompson wrote: Thanks, Tom. It is illogical, if you think about it. And surprising too, considering the effort the New Haven put into determining the exact interior arrangements in its passenger equipment. This might explain why five of the cars were listed as spares in the 1955 consist book I possess. 

Thanks again.

Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario

NHRHTA # 0668
 Is that a winter consist book ?  I suspect there was only one spare or none in the summer.  The 1956 guide shows aneed for 18 cars. 
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Joined: September 26th, 2006, 9:59 pm

February 9th, 2018, 12:17 pm #15

NewHavenGeek wrote:
Derek Thompson wrote: I have a question, the answer to which may have been lost to the winds of time.

The above-captioned cars were multi-purpose, what with 14 parlor chairs, a drawing room, 2 day roomettes and 11 lounge seats, with buffet, as well as a badge section. I can understand the rationale for  having the lounge seats in consists with regular parlor cars as well as the combines. But I have noted a number of consists in which these cars were the sole parlour conveyance. Of what possible use would those 11 lounge seats serve? One would hardly expect any of the 14 parlor car patrons to walk a few feet to sit in the lounge chairs. And those in the private accommodations chose privacy for a reason. Were the lounge seats sold as parlor chairs? Or were coach passengers permitted to enter into the exalted sanctum for a cold one?

My curiosity has been piqued. Responses welcomed and appreciated.


Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario 

NHRHTA # 0668
I believe that in addition to the normal services, they were partially used as club cars. Also they were normally only on the long range/name trains the NH ran. if the car you speak of is the only "parlor" on the train, then you should not be running the lightweight. I'd recommend either running a straight baggage in it's place or a heavyweight combine.
You can run the bagage -lounge parlor as the sole parlor cars if you are modeling the Springfield train or summer service to Bretton Woods-Fabaya or a section of the Day Cape Codder east of Buzzards Bay.
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Joined: June 13th, 2003, 4:27 pm

February 10th, 2018, 6:20 pm #16

Malcolm Laughlin wrote:
Derek Thompson wrote: Thanks, Tom. It is illogical, if you think about it. And surprising too, considering the effort the New Haven put into determining the exact interior arrangements in its passenger equipment. This might explain why five of the cars were listed as spares in the 1955 consist book I possess. 

Thanks again.

Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario

NHRHTA # 0668
 Is that a winter consist book ?  I suspect there was only one spare or none in the summer.  The 1956 guide shows aneed for 18 cars. 
Yes, it is a winter consist book, Malcolm. Thanks for reminding me of that; I should have realized the greater demands in summer months (I also have a summer systems timetable for 1955). 

Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario

NHRHTA  # 0668
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TomCurtin
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Joined: July 13th, 2017, 10:13 am

February 11th, 2018, 7:23 am #17

Derek Thompson wrote:

Yes, it is a winter consist book, Malcolm. Thanks for reminding me of that; I should have realized the greater demands in summer months (I also have a summer systems timetable for 1955). 

Derek Thompson
Toronto, Ontario

NHRHTA  # 0668
There was indeed a greater summer demand for the "County" baggage-parlor-lounges in particular, for the Cape Cod trains.  Each Day Cape Codder, and the weekend Neptune, carried two --- one for the Hyannis section and one for the WH section
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