Arch window cabs for steam

NHJJ4
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NHJJ4
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Joined: August 18th, 2003, 5:18 am

September 24th, 2017, 1:29 am #1

    Hay, 
I was on  ( Shapeways)  tonight  There are a few  more cab's being made for Steam They fit MDC, Athearn 2-8-2 BLI Heavy 2-8-2 and even a cab for our NH-3025 ?
   Does any body know about them ?

Sou Ry. Locomotive Cab for BLI Heavy 2-8-2 - HO (C9DBNNP8M) by DKRickman

New Haven 3025 cab 1/87 (SJWLYH26C) by csor8511
  Just asking

 Jim
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

September 24th, 2017, 10:20 am #2

Mr. Jim(NHJJ4). I just finished checking out the Shapeways site for the North American steam locomotive replacement cabs offered. Most were for the Southern Railway, with some for GTW, ATSF, CLC and two for the New Haven Railroad Mikado #3025 specifically. The first listed was 'NH 3025 Cab 1/87 $15.91 by CT Rail Models.' It is a replacement cab specifically designed to fit the Bachmann SY Mikado and isn't exact dimensionally. The second listed is 'Valley Railroad 3025 Cab HO Scale by Artist794's Workshop, $14.00' It is scaled from exact blueprints used to rebuild the Valley Railroad's Chinese built 3025 to resemble New Haven Railroad J Mikado. The item descriptions are based on the manufacturers' descriptions. Both items have a picture which does not show the sides, front, or top. Hope this helps.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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NHJJ4
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NHJJ4
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Joined: August 18th, 2003, 5:18 am

September 24th, 2017, 9:21 pm #3

 I had been looking at them for a while and the major selling point is the arch side window. they  ( the sellers ) keep adding to there lists as to what they fit. Could be a starting place to begin. There are  2-6-0 to 2-10-2 and a lot between those.
  Jim

 
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

September 24th, 2017, 9:52 pm #4

Mr. Jim(NHJJ4). I also saw the arched windows of most New Haven Railroad steam locomotive cabs as a difficult characteristic and spotting feature to duplicate. That was until Ms. Kathy Millatt's article, "Build a New Haven class J-2 Heavy Mikado," in Model Railroader, volume 78, issue 3, March 2011. Ms. Millatt said, "Using a hobby knife and files, I trimmed away the upper portion of the existing window and fill the gap with styrene cut in the arch shape..." Ms. Millatt continued for another paragraph on how to specifically make the windows and mullions. I think just modifying the windows instead of removing the entire cab is both easier and less expensive. But, the rest of the cab of the J-2's did need extensive work to get it close to the prototype and drawings. Looking at the level of details available with the 3-D printings, a replacement cab with some modifications may still be the more protypically correctable solution.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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nhhe52
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Joined: March 26th, 2004, 12:19 am

October 6th, 2017, 6:37 pm #5

I believe Rick has a steam engine with arched cab windows.  Not sure if he modeled it or not.

Ed
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3330
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3330
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 5:42 am

October 25th, 2017, 4:05 pm #6

Now if only someone would an arch-window cab for the Bachmann 2-8-0, as well as some decent steam and sand domes it would ease the conversion to an F-5.  Also dreaming about upgrading cylinders to the Bachmann 4-6-0.  Won't make a G-4. but would be nice to have better cylinders for a pretty nice model.
John Wilbur 3330
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

October 25th, 2017, 10:46 pm #7

Mr. Wilbur. Ms. Kathy Millatt's method for making arched windows in her article "Build a New Haven Class J-2 Heavy Mikado" in Model Railroader, Vol. 78, iss. 3, March 2011, on page 60, is fairly easy to apply to virtually any plastic model steam locomotive. I know that is the method I'm going to use when I start to rebuilt the cabs of my steam locomotives. If you don't have that issue, I can type in quotes the paragraph description of how to do it.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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rsullivan
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Joined: December 14th, 2016, 3:36 pm

October 25th, 2017, 11:18 pm #8

Mr. Wilbur. Regarding the cylinders and domes, Precision Scale Co, Inc.'s HO/HOn3 Steam Locomotive Super-Detailing Parts and Kits, Brass and Plastic, Catalog 4, has some possible parts for you to use. On page 54, part 31193 brass, 31672 plastic, Cyl. block, HO MDC 0-6-0, 5 pcs. is a compound cylinder. I don't know if it measure out at 24" x 32" cylinders. I would get the plastic so I could use Archer Rivet Decals. They have a whole bunch of sand domes on page 58, and steam domes on page 59. I have compared them with the pictures in Mr. J.W. Swanberg's New Haven Power 1838 - 1968, and I won't say for sure on any of them. Not sure if this helps or not.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
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NH746EJO
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 7:18 pm

October 26th, 2017, 11:46 am #9

RHODE ISLAND RR 026-002.jpg
The Bachman 4-6-0 with the low boiler makes a fairly good New Haven G-3 if you remove the Walschaert valve gear, smooth the domes with inlay and fill, change the headlight and add the tank under the cab.  The G-3 was a good branch line engine which would be useful on a model railroad. P1010003.JPG  I've thought of converting my Bachman 4-6-0 into a New Haven G-3 but at present it still works as my Northern RR "G-3 953" (The real Northern became part of the B&M).  The caboose is brass B&M but similar to the New Haven C-1/C-269.
COMPARISON --  The Bachmann 4-6-0 is a model of two Maryland & Pennsylvania engines, 27 built by Baldwin in 1906 and 28 a duplicate built by Baldwin in 1910.  New Haven G-3 class consisted of 20 engines numbered 950-969 built in 1903-1904 by Rhode Island Locomotive Works.  Both the G-3 and 27/28 had 19" diameter cylinders but the G-3 used a 26" stroke vs. 24" on the 27/28.  The G-3 had 57" drivers vs. 56" on the 27/28.  G-3's boiler pressure was only 160 lbs vs. 180 lbs..   Given the higher pressure and smaller drivers the 27/28 had a starting tractive force of 23,360 vs. 22,390 for the G-3 despite their longer stroke.  The as built weight of the G-3 was 217,500 lbs. with tender vs. 208,633 for 27/28 but the difference could have been in the tender.  The Ma&Pa engines were superheated in 1922/1924 and provided with Walschaert valve gear  but the G-3 class always used saturated steam.  The 27 an 28 were not retired until 1955 but most of the G-3 class had a life of only 25-30 years with only a few operating deep into the depression after many of the branch lines they were built for were gone. 
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Cosmo767
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Joined: October 29th, 2003, 8:47 pm

February 13th, 2018, 9:56 pm #10

After a VERY quick o/l search I found a photo of NH J-2 #3105 and compared it to the 3-d render of the SRR arched window cab for the BLI 2-8-2...
IT'S CLOSE!
Close enough for me.
Hopefully I'll have photos to show in a month or so.
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