A question on roundhouse modelling.

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A question on roundhouse modelling.

Tom Lapt
Member
Joined: 17 Mar 2016, 13:30

01 Nov 2017, 13:54 #1

I'm currently in the process of building an engine terminal facility for my planned modular HO layout; the turntable & roundhouse will be a 4 X 4 foot module in itself.  The turntable is the Walther's "Cornerstone" 130-foot model (yes, I know that's larger than anything New Haven used, but I may succumb eventually to my former PRR modelling tastes, & might possibly opt for something like a BLI PRR Q2 4-4-6-4 Duplex in the future 😉); the roundhouse is going to be a 6-stall Walther's Cornerstone "Modern" roundhouse (which, from the box photos, rather resembles the former roundhouse that used to be in the Bay St. yards where I live in Fall River, MA).  Over the past several weeks, I installed the turntable pit in the module, assembled the roundhouse foundation (complete with inspection pits & 2 extended stalls), & just completed laying the rails & their associated power-feed wires in the foundation last night.  After I track-test the roundhouse rail alignment with the turntable itself (& get any needed "tweaking" out of the way), I'm going to begin construction of the roundhouse superstructure.  I'm planning to install LED lighting along the framing as I do so, & I may paint & weather the roundhouse walls before installing the windows.  One question I have; did New Haven have any specific interior wall colors they normally used in their brick roundhouses?  The roundhouse assembly manual mentions that white-washing interior walls was a relatively common (generic) practice, & I'm leaning in that direction, the idea being that light-colored interior walls will help the interior lighting "showcase" 🤓 the locomotives inside.  Any thoughts on what New Haven's normal practices were? 

Tom Lapointe
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rsullivan
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Joined: 14 Dec 2016, 20:36

01 Nov 2017, 14:45 #2

Mr. Lapointe. None of the NHRTIA data sheets in the 15.4 series which diagram and give structural information on numerious roundhouses belonging to the New Haven give any information on the interior paint schemes. However, on page 22 of Mr. J.W. Swanberg's "Cedar Hill Roundhouse - An Obituary: Requiescat in Pace" in Shoreliner, vol. 20, iss. 4, an interior wall is visible. The picture is a black and white photo. However, about eight feet up there appears to be an apparent color change. The lower portion of the wall is a light gray, and the upper portion appears a dirty white. That is the only interior picture of a roundhouse I have found so far, but I haven't gone through all my facility books yet. If I remember from other articles, a common interior color was a light green, but I don't know the name of the shade. The real railroaders will have to help on an actual color, although the right colour/couleur might be known by Mr. Derek though.
Richard H. Sullivan, Jr.  member #3967
Last edited by rsullivan on 01 Nov 2017, 15:23, edited 1 time in total.
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Tom Lapt
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Joined: 17 Mar 2016, 13:30

01 Nov 2017, 15:09 #3

Thanks Rich, your input is much appreciated.  :)  At least starts to give me some ideas.  Anyone else want to chime in?

Tom Lapointe
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NH746EJO
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Joined: 25 Nov 2007, 00:18

01 Nov 2017, 15:21 #4

CHARLES ST INTERIOR

I remember the Charles Street roundhouse in Providence being white inside.  The following photo is one I took in 1955 when the roundhouse was being torn down.  You can see that what was left of the walls and some pillars still showed the white paint.
IMG_0001-006.jpg
 
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NH746EJO
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Joined: 25 Nov 2007, 00:18

01 Nov 2017, 15:42 #5

Canadian Pacific 1290.TIF-2.jpg  
Canadian Pacific 1280.TIF-2.jpg
It may be hard to believe that roundhouses were frequently white to improve lighting.  I took the following photos at the Canadian Pacific passenger engine roundhouse at Glen, Montreal when the 24-stall house was filled with active steam.  Notice dark gray was used on the vulnerable lower part of the interior
Last edited by NH746EJO on 03 Nov 2017, 15:18, edited 1 time in total.
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Tom Lapt
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Joined: 17 Mar 2016, 13:30

01 Nov 2017, 17:28 #6

Ed, thanks for those GREAT photos!  :)  That CP roundhouse picture is particularly interesting, with plain brick showing below the windows & white above; I don't have the Walthers kit in front of me at the moment, but if I remember correctly, I believe it does have brick detail molded into the interior walls; I noticed the mortar lines visible in the lower photos.  Might look interesting to highlight the mortar lines on the interior walls (which I'm already planning to do for the exterior), & paint the walls white above the lower window line.  I noticed the roof support columns appear to be white as well above the first few feet; might be interesting to do the kit up the same way.  ;)

Tom 
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nhhe52
Member
Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

01 Nov 2017, 18:07 #7

These are two interior images of a roundhouse model in white, not mine, but very nice work.  I believe the modeler installed a flashing welding LED in the pit under the locomotive in the first image:
RHI.2.jpg RHI.1.jpg
Last edited by nhhe52 on 14 Nov 2017, 14:43, edited 2 times in total.
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NH746EJO
Member
Joined: 25 Nov 2007, 00:18

02 Nov 2017, 14:49 #8

Roundhouse Interiors

Tom  ----  The lower brick work in the Glen roundhouse was a very dark almost black gray as was the pillar bottom.  I have a poor color version of the shot I posted and although it shows the mortar lines between the bricks as you noticed, the color is not natural brick. (EDIT CORRECTION -- A good friend just pointed out that what looks like brick courses is actually pipes in coils used for steam heating the building.)  Also, I took some pictures in the St. Luc roundhouse in Montreal which serviced the CPR freight engines.  The bottom five feet or so of the pillars in that house was white.  I suspect there was no standard for interiors on the CPR and probably on the New Haven as well.  I think white may have been used sometimes for safety reasons (and white wash may have been cheap ?)  since it would stand out against black engines. Turntable pit walls were often white, reportedly because they would be more obvious and help prevent falling in.  At Charles St. white wash was used extensively during steam days on exteriors including the concrete supports on the coaling tower and below the window line on the roundhouse  --- probably for safety and appearance.
           Check my site --    http://sites.google.com/site/roundhousesinprovidenceri
           Whether the interior of a roundhouse was clean or grimy probably depended on when the interior was painted.  I've been in several during the 1950s and don't remember any that were really bad but the one at Glen was as pristine as they get while St. Luc was dingy if I remember correctly even though it was much more modern (built in 1949) -- the difference might reflect that the CPR kept its passenger steam nice and clean right to the end but freight power was not as sharp looking.   I remember Charles Street as being dark but it had small windows and I was only inside after it became inactive and soon to be closed.   The B&M roundhouse at Boston was very bright inside because the back walls were glass brick but I never took a color picture inside and can't remember the colors.  The interiors of roundhouses were not as smoky as you might think because of  smoke hoods and ventilator monitors.  At the B&M house at Boston steam locomotives were often kept hot with steam from the power plant so that fires were banked and generally smokeless, particularly the engines that were held as spares and needed to be ready but not have fires needing close attention. 
            Following are three photos I took at the Boston & Maine roundhouse in East Somerville (Boston) during the mid 1950s.  The first shows P-2 4-6-2 3654 attached to the roundhouse steam line because I think she was on standby (most trains were diesel at the time).   The other two photos show that the interior was bright but I wish I could remember the interior colors.
                                                              Ed
IMG_0023.jpg
BandM.jpg
BandM 001.jpg
Last edited by NH746EJO on 03 Nov 2017, 15:23, edited 1 time in total.
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BX10
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Joined: 15 Jan 2010, 05:40

02 Nov 2017, 22:33 #9

ROUNDHOUSE 001.jpg round 001.jpg Inside the Cedar Hill 360 degree Roundhouse taken in 1982

 Bill
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nhhe52
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Joined: 26 Mar 2004, 05:19

07 Nov 2017, 22:39 #10

Great images guys.

Thanks,

Ed
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