Reverse Braid (dutch without head part)

Reverse Braid (dutch without head part)

Joined: March 23rd, 2004, 8:03 am

July 26th, 2004, 8:10 am #1

The dutch braid is the reverse of the french / classic braid. Instead of crossing the outside hair over the middle, you cross the middle over the outside.

You start out with a ponytail.





Then you part your hair into three equal parts (here shown one-handed) and separate the strands over the whole length.





Then you begin braiding by pulling the middle hair over the left part. This is a bit tricky, since your top hair easily gets disarranged. Pull with even pressure.





Then the middle goes over the right.





Hold hair in one hand and separate the strands again to prevent self-braiding. Then arrange the braid and cross the middle over the left.





And the middle over the right.






The braid should be stable by now. You continue on down the length and detangle regularly.





At the end, tie off with a scruncie.




Tight braiding without pulling:
How tight a braid is is determined not by the pull on the strands but by how far "up" you cross the strands. A loose braid has plenty of room between the cross-over-points, making it easy to pull on the individual strands in the finished braid.
When you cross very near the last cross, the braid gets tight.
Usually, classic braids get tighter than dutch/reverse braids since classic braiding is the technique we learn first. You can see it in these pictures: Even my dutch braids are more loose than my classics and I have been dutch braiding for two years.

Have a nice time,

Thea




1bFii
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Joined: March 1st, 2003, 11:27 am

July 26th, 2004, 3:52 pm #2

I have been looking for instructions for that braid.
Your hair looks pretty

Now lets talk about that shirt, I love it. Looks very light and feminine.

Angel Hugs and Love



<font face="Garamond" color="660033" size="2">Betty
March 2001 - Present
Pale Blonde
2abM/Ciii
Medium to Coarse, Thick, Very Long Layers

20 1/2 - July 1st 25 3/4 BSL - 30
2nd Short Term Goal: Past BSL
27" by Fall</font>



<font face="Garamond" color="660033" size="2">The Seasons, 1897
Alphonse Mucha</font>
<font face="Garamond" color="660033" size="2">My Vanity</font>
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Joined: March 23rd, 2004, 8:03 am

July 26th, 2004, 5:27 pm #3

I did it myself. Take a Raglan Blouse and do Smock needlepoint.
The computer is also self-assembled

Thank you very much.

--Thea




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MrsEl
MrsEl

July 26th, 2004, 6:50 pm #4

The dutch braid is the reverse of the french / classic braid. Instead of crossing the outside hair over the middle, you cross the middle over the outside.

You start out with a ponytail.





Then you part your hair into three equal parts (here shown one-handed) and separate the strands over the whole length.





Then you begin braiding by pulling the middle hair over the left part. This is a bit tricky, since your top hair easily gets disarranged. Pull with even pressure.





Then the middle goes over the right.





Hold hair in one hand and separate the strands again to prevent self-braiding. Then arrange the braid and cross the middle over the left.





And the middle over the right.






The braid should be stable by now. You continue on down the length and detangle regularly.





At the end, tie off with a scruncie.




Tight braiding without pulling:
How tight a braid is is determined not by the pull on the strands but by how far "up" you cross the strands. A loose braid has plenty of room between the cross-over-points, making it easy to pull on the individual strands in the finished braid.
When you cross very near the last cross, the braid gets tight.
Usually, classic braids get tighter than dutch/reverse braids since classic braiding is the technique we learn first. You can see it in these pictures: Even my dutch braids are more loose than my classics and I have been dutch braiding for two years.

Have a nice time,

Thea




1bFii
Thanks for sharing! I've wondered how to do that.

~MrsEl~
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Fox
Joined: January 13th, 2003, 7:14 am

July 28th, 2004, 7:15 am #5

The dutch braid is the reverse of the french / classic braid. Instead of crossing the outside hair over the middle, you cross the middle over the outside.

You start out with a ponytail.





Then you part your hair into three equal parts (here shown one-handed) and separate the strands over the whole length.





Then you begin braiding by pulling the middle hair over the left part. This is a bit tricky, since your top hair easily gets disarranged. Pull with even pressure.





Then the middle goes over the right.





Hold hair in one hand and separate the strands again to prevent self-braiding. Then arrange the braid and cross the middle over the left.





And the middle over the right.






The braid should be stable by now. You continue on down the length and detangle regularly.





At the end, tie off with a scruncie.




Tight braiding without pulling:
How tight a braid is is determined not by the pull on the strands but by how far "up" you cross the strands. A loose braid has plenty of room between the cross-over-points, making it easy to pull on the individual strands in the finished braid.
When you cross very near the last cross, the braid gets tight.
Usually, classic braids get tighter than dutch/reverse braids since classic braiding is the technique we learn first. You can see it in these pictures: Even my dutch braids are more loose than my classics and I have been dutch braiding for two years.

Have a nice time,

Thea




1bFii


-Fox


17/34/35+ Type 2CMii (3B underneath layer) Somewhat fine, slightly wavy (with curls on the underneath layer), Hennaed Auburn. To see more pictures, click on the gallery collection link found here:
<a href=http://www.geocities.com/ifoxbox/ForeverFox.html> Forever Fox </a>


"Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Choose your words, for they become actions. Understand your actions, for they become habits. Study your habits, they will become your character. Develop your character for it becomes your destiny." -John MacArthur

Products Used:
Aubrey Organics S&C
Nature's Gate Conditioners (As well as Forest Pure, another brand made by the makers of Nature's Gate)
Vinegar/herbal rinses

Oils: Jojoba, Sweet Almond, Virgin Oil de Coco Creme, Monoi, Castor, Meadowfoam Seed & essential oils

Shea Butter (from which I make my own leave-in)
MP Popular Mix Brush
Wood and Horn combs
Vitamins/Minerals/Herbal supplements
-Fox
Starting my growing journey all over again after health issues took a major toll on my hair.
17/25.5/35+ - Type 2C-3bMii Somewhat fine, wavy (with corkscrew curls on the underneath layer), natural color is light brown with gold and red highlights. Previously used henna for years, but had it highlighted out over a couple of years. Currently trying to decide what to do as far as continuing with that to keep up the roots or doing something different.

Products Used:
Aubrey Organics S&C - my most favorite, but currently using Neways Second Chance Shampoo, SheaMoisture's High Porosity Moisture-Seal Masque,
Sally Beauty Generic Value Product's version of Matrix Biolage conditioner (as a leave in, not rinsed out)
Aubrey Organics Chia Gel
Vinegar/herbal rinses
Oils: Jojoba, Castor, Coconut & essential oils
MP Popular Mix Brush
MP & Madora wide tooth combs
Vitamins/Minerals/Herbal supplements

"Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Choose your words, for they become actions. Understand your actions, for they become habits. Study your habits, they will become your character. Develop your character for it becomes your destiny."
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Kandace
Kandace

May 6th, 2006, 6:13 am #6

The dutch braid is the reverse of the french / classic braid. Instead of crossing the outside hair over the middle, you cross the middle over the outside.

You start out with a ponytail.





Then you part your hair into three equal parts (here shown one-handed) and separate the strands over the whole length.





Then you begin braiding by pulling the middle hair over the left part. This is a bit tricky, since your top hair easily gets disarranged. Pull with even pressure.





Then the middle goes over the right.





Hold hair in one hand and separate the strands again to prevent self-braiding. Then arrange the braid and cross the middle over the left.





And the middle over the right.






The braid should be stable by now. You continue on down the length and detangle regularly.





At the end, tie off with a scruncie.




Tight braiding without pulling:
How tight a braid is is determined not by the pull on the strands but by how far "up" you cross the strands. A loose braid has plenty of room between the cross-over-points, making it easy to pull on the individual strands in the finished braid.
When you cross very near the last cross, the braid gets tight.
Usually, classic braids get tighter than dutch/reverse braids since classic braiding is the technique we learn first. You can see it in these pictures: Even my dutch braids are more loose than my classics and I have been dutch braiding for two years.

Have a nice time,

Thea




1bFii
evidently i've always done this reverse braid rather than the normal braid. i can't even figure out how to braid the classic way! so confusing.

anyway, thank you for letting me know that i don't braid normal xD;
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Joined: February 15th, 2009, 5:20 pm

April 9th, 2009, 4:20 pm #7

The dutch braid is the reverse of the french / classic braid. Instead of crossing the outside hair over the middle, you cross the middle over the outside.

You start out with a ponytail.





Then you part your hair into three equal parts (here shown one-handed) and separate the strands over the whole length.





Then you begin braiding by pulling the middle hair over the left part. This is a bit tricky, since your top hair easily gets disarranged. Pull with even pressure.





Then the middle goes over the right.





Hold hair in one hand and separate the strands again to prevent self-braiding. Then arrange the braid and cross the middle over the left.





And the middle over the right.






The braid should be stable by now. You continue on down the length and detangle regularly.





At the end, tie off with a scruncie.




Tight braiding without pulling:
How tight a braid is is determined not by the pull on the strands but by how far "up" you cross the strands. A loose braid has plenty of room between the cross-over-points, making it easy to pull on the individual strands in the finished braid.
When you cross very near the last cross, the braid gets tight.
Usually, classic braids get tighter than dutch/reverse braids since classic braiding is the technique we learn first. You can see it in these pictures: Even my dutch braids are more loose than my classics and I have been dutch braiding for two years.

Have a nice time,

Thea




1bFii
they dont show up


-Dolly
2aNii
19 years old
started growing Febuary 2009
20/21/30 (waist on me..im short )
goal 1 - grow out highlights and layers
goal 2 - grow to waist
goal 3 - grow to tailbone and beyond!
coconut oil wednesday and saturday nights
coconut oil on ends during the day
cwc wash method
i love my bone comb!
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