Yellow Belt 101

Yellow Belt 101

Joined: February 1st, 2011, 2:55 am

February 12th, 2011, 6:18 am #1

Hello fellow kenpo brother/sisters, this was a friendly discussion i had with some fellow kenpoist and friends that are in other martial art systems

What is your take on yellow belt training, some schools/instructors teach application plan and simple no variation no what if's , just yellow as its taught in the manual.

Some go a little further where they introduce minor tailoring and some what if scenarios where they can refer back to techniques they have already been doing, but still keep it basic enough where a beginner student can grasp whats going on.

Some (and this is where the discussion/debate really started) go into alot of what if scenarios, knife & stick fighting, gun defense, grappling & jujitsu locks/throws.

Now every instructor is entitled to teach how they wish, but what are some opinions on the so called traditional methods of teaching where the student learns the basics of the system(crawl before you walk so to speak)and as they begin to understand, you give them more concepts of the applications.

Or the more practical so called todays methods of teaching, where you throw everything but the kitchen sink at a beginning student, introduce all this new movement and techniques, concepts, all kinda scenarios, weapon attacks, freestyle movement, grappling.. ect
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Joined: March 5th, 2005, 2:18 pm

February 12th, 2011, 6:26 am #2

At the beginning level, I teach beginning kenpo. At that stage, I'm happy if they have decent footwork and a grasp on the concepts. I'll pick one or two techniques and show them the what-ifs so they are prepared for them later. I won't expect that of of them on their belt test. At that level, getting the alphabet of motion figured out is pretty important. Putting it together in short sentences is good. Composing their own stuff on the fly - that's past yellow.


On the other hand - if I have a student that has background in another art or grasps concepts quickly, is more athletic than most, I'll ratchet it up a notch. So.... bottom line? It depends.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com

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Joined: September 18th, 2009, 4:26 pm

February 12th, 2011, 12:06 pm #3

Hello fellow kenpo brother/sisters, this was a friendly discussion i had with some fellow kenpoist and friends that are in other martial art systems

What is your take on yellow belt training, some schools/instructors teach application plan and simple no variation no what if's , just yellow as its taught in the manual.

Some go a little further where they introduce minor tailoring and some what if scenarios where they can refer back to techniques they have already been doing, but still keep it basic enough where a beginner student can grasp whats going on.

Some (and this is where the discussion/debate really started) go into alot of what if scenarios, knife & stick fighting, gun defense, grappling & jujitsu locks/throws.

Now every instructor is entitled to teach how they wish, but what are some opinions on the so called traditional methods of teaching where the student learns the basics of the system(crawl before you walk so to speak)and as they begin to understand, you give them more concepts of the applications.

Or the more practical so called todays methods of teaching, where you throw everything but the kitchen sink at a beginning student, introduce all this new movement and techniques, concepts, all kinda scenarios, weapon attacks, freestyle movement, grappling.. ect
our teacher structures class, is highly detailed, organized, focused, removes doubt, explains things to us in ways we can understand, is a great teacher, is well educated, my questions aren't answered with ******** smoke and mirrors like I've had from some other martial arts instructors. He doesn't just give us the answers, he has us think for ourselves, which I have found to be a rare trait in teachers. if it was common I'd have a longer awesome teachers list. ; )

anyway, he pushes us to push ourselves, he encourages us to push ourselves, teaches us the correct way of doing things, teaches us to self correct. I gain new insight in our conversations, he's funny, he's insightful, he has a great eye for detail, he has that quality I really admire in that he expects a lot from his students but also expects a lot from himself and values the time we have together.

I found my favorite teachers have been those who are fair, expect hard work, dedication, practice, correctness, etc. I always expected more of myself when the teacher did too. I had a previous art I had been in for 4 years in which my instructor did not remove my doubts, I realized something was missing.

I remembered from my limited background in shotokan and shutokan when I was younger that we stood in a horse and did a lot of basics and were told the correct way to do the basic so we could teach ourselves, and got corrected if we weren't getting it, and they made sure we were all doing it right.

I remembered the feeling of hitting and being hit from boxing, I remembered the body in motion against another active body from wrestling, a friend started showing me shoot fighting submissions and our wrestling coach would sometimes show us freestyle submissions that we weren't allowed to use in school competition haha, so I had these experiences.

from both boxing and wrestling I gained this sense of live action, full speed, the development of better condition, skill, strategy, combinations, deception/feinting, 'techniques', some principles, drilling CORRECT movement until we had automatic reactions that had a smaller margin for error and how to adjust when things didn't go our way, that 'flow' of adjustment.

if you wanted to be good, you had to practice and make your skill good for the real encounter against another person who wanted to beat you. I learned I wanted it more. I made the decision that I wanted it bad enough that I would work until I got good enough to beat anybody I wrestled. my skill didn't get super high though as I stopped after junior high, some dumb kid excuses and not understanding the value at the time and all.

I remembered these good things and that my instructor in that current art wasn't giving me all of those things, pieces were missing. I took a tour of about 15 different schools/arts in the area, taking their free lessons, free week trials, etc. searching for more.

every place I went asked me if I had done a lot of martial arts because I moved pretty good and picked up quick. some, I'd say.

my current teacher was the first to say 'yeah that's pretty good but the outward extended block should blocking your head, your arm should be parallel to the ground, because you're protecting against a weapon at this height level, forearm is vertically slightly pushed out because you don't want it to fold, you also don't want your forearm horizontal though because you lose margin for error. if I'm punching at your face, would you want this much area to block with, or this much area? well that's what we call a small margin for error and a large margin for error. this position gives us a larger margin for error while still being effective. it's like a windshield wiper on a car, would you rather have the whole windshield wiper in the rain, or just a 4 inch section of wiper?' stuff like that.

then I made my block correct, if there was something I wasn't getting he helped me see it, and I learned to fix it. sometimes if I wasn't getting it right away he'd turn my hand, life my arm, tell me to relax my shoulder, all these little things, helping me to perfect more and more, correct more, etc.

anyway, I want to continue to develop, learn, deepen, improve, break through limitations, push myself harder and farther and longer and stronger, etc.

analogy: my teacher is like a lamp illuminating the path beyond what I see, and teaching me how to be a light unto myself. he's climbed up and down the mountain, inside outside, etc, as he put it to me one day when I expressed my gratitude for teaching me, "I'm sharing the knowledge, you're teaching yourself."
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

February 12th, 2011, 12:48 pm #4

Hello fellow kenpo brother/sisters, this was a friendly discussion i had with some fellow kenpoist and friends that are in other martial art systems

What is your take on yellow belt training, some schools/instructors teach application plan and simple no variation no what if's , just yellow as its taught in the manual.

Some go a little further where they introduce minor tailoring and some what if scenarios where they can refer back to techniques they have already been doing, but still keep it basic enough where a beginner student can grasp whats going on.

Some (and this is where the discussion/debate really started) go into alot of what if scenarios, knife & stick fighting, gun defense, grappling & jujitsu locks/throws.

Now every instructor is entitled to teach how they wish, but what are some opinions on the so called traditional methods of teaching where the student learns the basics of the system(crawl before you walk so to speak)and as they begin to understand, you give them more concepts of the applications.

Or the more practical so called todays methods of teaching, where you throw everything but the kitchen sink at a beginning student, introduce all this new movement and techniques, concepts, all kinda scenarios, weapon attacks, freestyle movement, grappling.. ect
Step 1 for a beginner to successfully assimilate your current level of teaching methodology,

A) Teach the attack. Show then the ranges of the arms and legs from I.I. 4.

B) Attack them with intent. Emphasis what it feels like to be grabbed and pushed with your mass behind the attack, but do not use them as rag doll experiments in a quest to show how tough you think you are. "The bumper and the truck" analogy works good.....

C) Do not, under any circumstances, let the beginner student step back BEFORE the push actually pushes them, make sure that they step with the push.

D) Try to resist using Blocking Set 1 as a combat model while in a static horse stance. Blocking Set 1 teaches how to control the centerline. Paths and lines, controlling points of the shoulder and elbow, these things are important to the structure of the blocks at Yellow.

E) Know the difference in stepping back naturally and stepping back to a neutral bow, a horse, a forward bow...... The first three techs step back the same way, but the timing is different, the beginner should know the difference before they learn Deflecting Hammer.

F) Make sure that you have four five students (at least five) students in class to work Short Form 1. Make sure that the beginning student knows to block on the outside of the attack with their inward and downward blocks, and on the inside of the attack with the vertical outward block, and with the fleshy part of the fist with the upward block.

Basics 101, at each level. Posture 101, at each level. You know what, there are no levels, the color of the belt is one long *** ribbon that either gets darker with time or just fakes it because the instructor don't know what they are doing.

Clark
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Joined: February 13th, 2004, 1:04 am

February 12th, 2011, 2:11 pm #5

At the beginning level, I teach beginning kenpo. At that stage, I'm happy if they have decent footwork and a grasp on the concepts. I'll pick one or two techniques and show them the what-ifs so they are prepared for them later. I won't expect that of of them on their belt test. At that level, getting the alphabet of motion figured out is pretty important. Putting it together in short sentences is good. Composing their own stuff on the fly - that's past yellow.


On the other hand - if I have a student that has background in another art or grasps concepts quickly, is more athletic than most, I'll ratchet it up a notch. So.... bottom line? It depends.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com
As a facilitator having owned my studio for 27 years and then closing it down last year due to economy and other reasons, if a person becomes known in their community as a qualified instructor you will always be searched out by those who have heard of the reputation you have built.
My point is this if we treat the ranking system like a academic study the Yellow belt is like going to First Grade in the public school system. You will learn your ABC'c, how to form words, and then begin to speak the language to form fluid speech in something that will develop over a short time.
Now like most who have a mixed audience of new inspired to learn students you must motivate them by building their confidence with informing them what is expected of them at each level by giving them your curriculum. This tangible recipe you will give them a gauge of what to expect, what they must qualify for, as well as a tool to let them see their own performance being established...and this builds the "I Can Attitude" giving them goals, confidence and trust in your coaching skills.
When I was learning the busines side of running a full time school I had reached out to Mr.Parker and a few others who assisted me in learning the importance of 'Not' teaching to much, to soon and expecting to much from my Elementary level students.
In my career I have experimented what worked for 'Me' in my school since we all have our own theme of what and who we want to teach.
In the late 90's I met Greg Silva who was the president of United Professionals, he was very good at helping those like myself how to operate a school/club like a business not to be confused as a hobby of interest.
Then I also like Mr. Silva networked with Educational Funding Company, NAPMA, and I have to say people like Steve LaValle, Manny Cabrera Sr, and friends like Joe Palanzo, Lee Wedlake and Joe Corley were great mentors in passing on their worth on this topic.
Today I still teach, as they say you may leave the art but the art will never leave you and so I am still teaching my passion 3 days a week and created my own VIP Program but run it with a tighter discipline now than what is going on mostly in the industry as far as the commercial side of Day Care Karate school pick up and less on the side of 'What you earn- you get', because of the generation change it is much harder to run old school of..work hard, learn hard, and quality vs quantity is the final word.
I say if it works for you, then keep at it. I like to from time to time even in my seminars teach the 'Variable Expansion' way of things. This creates the dynamics and excitement for all students to enjoy no matter what rank attends class.
The Science of Kenpo is quite fun especially if you show moves(Motion) that is Parrallel to what they already know. If you share with them that 'Delayed Sword' done with a Double factor Parry and a front cross over to it is no more than the entry to 'Entwined Lance' we now have a Yellow Belt doing something a Brown Belt is learning, this creates fun drills and advanced thinking.
Best way to get answers in the art when researching I have always said then reach out and call your Kenpo uncles and Grand Parents...such as Steve LaBounty, Bob White, Mike Pick, Joe Palanzo, Lee Wedlake, Huk Planas, Gary Ellis, Ed Downey, John Sepulveda...and the Kenpo Yellow Pages or internet communication ability is endless!!!
Enjoy..TCB

TCB....Sean Kelley
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Joined: August 27th, 2009, 2:50 am

February 15th, 2011, 4:07 am #6

Hello fellow kenpo brother/sisters, this was a friendly discussion i had with some fellow kenpoist and friends that are in other martial art systems

What is your take on yellow belt training, some schools/instructors teach application plan and simple no variation no what if's , just yellow as its taught in the manual.

Some go a little further where they introduce minor tailoring and some what if scenarios where they can refer back to techniques they have already been doing, but still keep it basic enough where a beginner student can grasp whats going on.

Some (and this is where the discussion/debate really started) go into alot of what if scenarios, knife & stick fighting, gun defense, grappling & jujitsu locks/throws.

Now every instructor is entitled to teach how they wish, but what are some opinions on the so called traditional methods of teaching where the student learns the basics of the system(crawl before you walk so to speak)and as they begin to understand, you give them more concepts of the applications.

Or the more practical so called todays methods of teaching, where you throw everything but the kitchen sink at a beginning student, introduce all this new movement and techniques, concepts, all kinda scenarios, weapon attacks, freestyle movement, grappling.. ect
And I'm not talking about live floaters either. Show them some of the ideas and concepts they'll be working towards as they come to be ready for it, sure. You want them to be informed. But a person cannot swim in the triathalon if they cannot even float, and they cannot survive a full out street fight if they do not know how to hit. Lee Wedlake always harps on setting your base, if you don't then you'll have no power and no stability. But how can your student set his or her base if they don't know the mother stances? Or as I tell my daughter, you have to know the notes before you can pick out the melody; and you must be able to at least play the melody before you can ever hope to play the cords. And if you can't play and sing the song as a solo, forget putting it together with full orchestra and chorus complete with three part harmony. Any group of fools can get together for a sing-a-long, but only one who has learned each step well before going on to the next can hope to arrange a performance at the met.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

February 15th, 2011, 6:48 am #7

"Or as I tell my daughter, you have to know the notes before you can pick out the melody; and you must be able to at least play the melody before you can ever hope to play the cords."

D Chording, tune all the strings of the guitar so you use one finger to chord the music. Whaqt category completion does that fall in to?

kralC
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Joined: August 27th, 2009, 2:50 am

February 16th, 2011, 2:36 am #8

Tailoring or Spontaneous, your choice (nt)
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

February 18th, 2011, 12:27 am #9

"Or as I tell my daughter, you have to know the notes before you can pick out the melody; and you must be able to at least play the melody before you can ever hope to play the cords."

D Chording, tune all the strings of the guitar so you use one finger to chord the music. Whaqt category completion does that fall in to?

kralC
would reflect tailoring and rearrangement. Taking it to cat com would involve tuning every single possible variation of the [string x string x fret] combination possible. More would sound dissonant than pleasant.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

February 18th, 2011, 4:48 am #10

Ask BB King about bending a note. Vibrato!!!!

kralC
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