What was Ed Parker's greatest contribution to the art?

What was Ed Parker's greatest contribution to the art?

Joined: January 19th, 2004, 2:11 am

November 14th, 2011, 2:09 am #1

Just a thought.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

November 14th, 2011, 3:11 am #2

So I asked Clyde as I sit here at his home this question and he posts it.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

November 14th, 2011, 4:05 am #3

Just a thought.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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his son Edmund, because, the way Edmund learned Kenpo is pretty much the method I work Kenpo
with my son Jack. Hey Jack, let's see what happens when you do this and I do this.

Those small Kenpo laboratory experiments that are informative and painful at the same time.

Clark
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Joined: June 13th, 2005, 7:25 pm

November 14th, 2011, 1:25 pm #4

Just a thought.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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.
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

November 14th, 2011, 3:59 pm #5

Just a thought.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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He broke away from tradition. He evolved. That was the best thing anybody could do to an art.

Much love...
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Joined: January 19th, 2004, 2:11 am

November 17th, 2011, 2:30 am #6

He broke away from tradition? How so? Did he really evolve? And why would that be the best thing anyone could do?

I'd say he stayed with tradition, the culture, the uniforms, the ranking, the art.

Evolved? Nah, he just understood what the art what telling him to do as I'm sure others before him did, they just didn't have the "right thing" to get it to the masses.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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Last edited by ClydeT on November 17th, 2011, 2:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

November 17th, 2011, 4:10 pm #7

In martial arts you have teachers who and styles that either stick with tradition, or evolve. Mr. Parker evolved (that's common knowledge). Bruce Lee evolved. Joe Lewis evolved. There are others.

Pg. 120 "The Zen of Kenpo" by Ed Parker:

"Traditionalists often study what is taught, not what there is to create."

Pg. 121

"Knowledge is bound when confined to tradition; knowledge is endless when tradition is bound."

"Don't be a traditional bigot who accepts nothing other than what he has been brainwashed to believe."

"It would be wrong to say that we cannot learn from tradition, but to be practical, we cannot let it be the all-encompassing authority."

"Those who stick to tradition can only lead themselves to contradition."

"Stric reliance on traditional (classical) methods not only restricts creativity and self-expression, but fails to alter with our ever-changing environment."

You see, Clyde, these are just Mr. Parker's quotes from one book. I could give you countless references in forms of Mr. Parker's writings, interviews with him (that can be found on youtube), and so on where he explains about constantly evolving and breaking away from tradition. If you don't have the Kenpo Journal that Rich Hale put together you may want to invest in it. There are numerous interviews from several magazine articles where Mr. Parker talks about this subject.

We are not traditional. In fact Mr. Parker's biggest fear was that when he was gone, his art would become traditionalized. I know some people who have went that route - not me, my friend.

Always great chatting with you.

Have a nice day.

Michael Miller
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

November 17th, 2011, 4:23 pm #8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRs3Niac0lk

Just found this interview with Ed Parker Jr. talking about this very thing. The 50 second mark.

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Joined: January 19th, 2004, 2:11 am

November 18th, 2011, 12:36 am #9

In martial arts you have teachers who and styles that either stick with tradition, or evolve. Mr. Parker evolved (that's common knowledge). Bruce Lee evolved. Joe Lewis evolved. There are others.

Pg. 120 "The Zen of Kenpo" by Ed Parker:

"Traditionalists often study what is taught, not what there is to create."

Pg. 121

"Knowledge is bound when confined to tradition; knowledge is endless when tradition is bound."

"Don't be a traditional bigot who accepts nothing other than what he has been brainwashed to believe."

"It would be wrong to say that we cannot learn from tradition, but to be practical, we cannot let it be the all-encompassing authority."

"Those who stick to tradition can only lead themselves to contradition."

"Stric reliance on traditional (classical) methods not only restricts creativity and self-expression, but fails to alter with our ever-changing environment."

You see, Clyde, these are just Mr. Parker's quotes from one book. I could give you countless references in forms of Mr. Parker's writings, interviews with him (that can be found on youtube), and so on where he explains about constantly evolving and breaking away from tradition. If you don't have the Kenpo Journal that Rich Hale put together you may want to invest in it. There are numerous interviews from several magazine articles where Mr. Parker talks about this subject.

We are not traditional. In fact Mr. Parker's biggest fear was that when he was gone, his art would become traditionalized. I know some people who have went that route - not me, my friend.

Always great chatting with you.

Have a nice day.

Michael Miller
He's saying not to get wrapped up in traditional stuff, much like Bruce used to say, figure Bruce got it from Mr. Parker. Everything that we do in the art is traditional somewhere, it's the combination of those styles and systems that makes us unique in how we approach our pedagogy. The techniques are nothing new, they're just better thought out, logically, and with solid prinicples to back the action. The universal pattern is traditional, just better laid out for a unique understanding of motion that Mr. Parker envisioned.

Rich Hale, along with his wife, were both Tatum black belts. I am a Tatum black belt from a slightly different time, see the correlation? Does his book expound on what Larry taught him? Is there something new that Larry doesn't teach?

Evolved is a pretty expansive word, more like refined.

So, any other thoughts?

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde




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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

November 18th, 2011, 3:04 am #10

Just a thought.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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I don't know about "greatest" as all things in this universe are ultimately equal. So let me say in my opinion what I see as a very significant contribution. In order to really appreciate the contribution one is at a good advantage if they were involved in the art before Ed made a pivitol change and I was. When I started the art I studied was called "Chinese Kenpo". There came a point when the way technique was applied changed and Parker made that change. Technique shifted to sublimation to the principle of point of origin movement. Firing of weapons without relocating them first. Moving away from the "John Wayne wind up punch" to motion which applied principles which achieved their goal through augmenting the body to throw the weapon from it's present location and thus achieve as much or even more power and speed.

Additionally I would insert that Parker put a lot of emphysis on the concept of reverse motions as options of consideration.

Of course when we moved out of the "Chinese Kenpo" the number of techniques in the manuals were cut dramatically and the idea of "thinking" verses simply excuting techniques from memory can in to play. So instead of having like 500 techniques that were individually isolated there were less techniques but fusion principles like grafting entered the picture. Also I would say that we began having a principled reason for doing something verses just doing it because you are supposed to.

So that is my view. To me point of origin as I said was a big change.

Oh yeah he also made it so it became cool to have high rank and be overweight leading to a whole lineage of Kenpo masters that fit that profile...

Shanti!
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