What makes a "good" martal arts instructor?

What makes a "good" martal arts instructor?

Joined: May 31st, 2006, 4:12 pm

January 17th, 2011, 8:27 am #1

I just wrote a personal article on this topic and would like to know people's thoughts.

also a few other questions:

1) are you a martial arts instructor? If so, why would you believe that you are a "good" one?

2) What makes a bad instructor?

salute,
Maurice A. Gomez
Last edited by magdesign on January 17th, 2011, 8:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 7th, 2004, 11:02 am

January 17th, 2011, 11:24 am #2

Got my thoughts, but also a lot of work to do, so no time to elaborate now. But I did come across this artiecle from Michael Miller on this subject:http://bit.ly/e4l51y

Have fun reading!!

Marcel

***************************************
Marcel de Jong, 4th Black from the Netherlands

http://www.katsudokenpo.nl
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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

January 17th, 2011, 8:03 pm #3

I just wrote a personal article on this topic and would like to know people's thoughts.

also a few other questions:

1) are you a martial arts instructor? If so, why would you believe that you are a "good" one?

2) What makes a bad instructor?

salute,
Maurice A. Gomez
I am not currently a martial arts instructor. I do love teaching martial arts and have taught a few different times in the past. I am always willing to share what knowledge I have. Ive learned a lot from my teaching mistakes. Just to name a few, I often taught techniques, concepts and principles that I knew were above the skill level of the practitioner. I justified this mentally by saying that I am challenging them to raise the bar but I know that certain lessons need to come first before those concepts can be actualized. I am often too detailed in my explanations as if I am answering questions that have not yet been asked, this eats up time that should have been spent ingraining the lesson. Sometimes I think I can be too much of a perfectionist when sometimes what they really need is a good job, keep up the hard work. When I got students that joined only to show off what they know versus being there to learn, I feel like I should have just discussed the matter with them on the side rather than crush their hopes and dreams. I need more patience and simpler explanations, shorter analogies and more drills. Also I need to teach forms way more than I did.


Take the time to familiarize students with those you consider quality instructors to pursue further training with when you part ways. Forewarn students about the history & politics of the art in an unbiased manner so they dont stumble into it one day and quit the art in disgust. Do not charge money for lessons if you can avoid it. Work out along with the students and spar along with them as well. You will find the students respect a teacher who sweats with them, then one who is barking orders and not willing to get dirty. The main point I would stress when it comes to teaching a system as in-depth as American Kenpo or similar system is that you need to take your time and go in order one small step at a time. Do not take Delayed Sword and turn it into a lesson on every concept and principle in the art because by the time you are done boring your students to death, you have eaten up the time they would have had working the technique under your watchful eye.

One thing you can do is set aside open mat times where students are free to come and work out on whatever they want and you can use that same time to train yourself Too often teachers do not keep in shape or keep up their skill, they trick themselves mentally by assuming that the classes they teach are enough to cover them but deep down you know that you often need to work on things and in a manner that really challenges you at your level not your students level or you will decay!
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Joined: May 7th, 2009, 2:29 am

January 17th, 2011, 8:17 pm #4

What makes a bad instructor?

1. All talk no skill
2. Teaching a pretty versus a practical method of application
3. Cult Leader (You need to bow lower! Now arch your back!)
4. Hustler (dont forget to pay the shoe rack tax!)
5. Sexist (now take it easy on her!)
6. this list could go on forever lol
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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 1:19 pm

January 18th, 2011, 5:19 am #5

I just wrote a personal article on this topic and would like to know people's thoughts.

also a few other questions:

1) are you a martial arts instructor? If so, why would you believe that you are a "good" one?

2) What makes a bad instructor?

salute,
Maurice A. Gomez
I have been actively teaching since 1986. It has been my primary source of income since 1992. I have around 80 Blackbelts in California and in Kenya.
What I tell my people is "The only real power an Instructor has is the number of students he can get, and maintain.""
I have wrote 5 teaching manuals on what it takes to get and keep students. One of the main problems I see with my Instructors is when they stop their own personal learning. In the Kenya Kenpo Federation we have requirements, and it is up to each Instructor to know and teach them. The problem is when students reach level 3 and 4 (green & blue belts) they get bored because they hardly learn anything new, because some Instructors don't give them a deeper understanding of the Martial Arts as they progress to the higher levels. And this is because they stop learning themselves.
Another problem is when Instructors teach kids the same way they teach adults. It is so sad to see this happening.

www.kkfkenpo.110mb.com
www.africansportkarate.110mb.com
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

January 18th, 2011, 11:49 am #6

"The only real power an Instructor has is the number of students he can get, and maintain.""


This is typical of you Amen...

The only real power is, is how much difference they make in any one single student in terms of their knowledge base and excecution. All the better if they mold many but what really matters is the quality of what is transferred to the student or students and if it sticks.
Last edited by kenpo58 on January 18th, 2011, 11:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 1:19 pm

January 18th, 2011, 9:01 pm #7

""The only real power is, is how much difference they make in any one single student in terms of their knowledge base and excecution.""

What the hell does that mean? Did you just make that up off the top of your head just to create an argument???

"""in any one student???"""
One is never enough....

I'm talking in the context of the Martial Art World. Daa! The more students an Instructor has the more respect he commands. The more power he has.
1. Tournament Promoters will seek him out.
2. Equipment companies will make deals with him.
3. His competitors will keep off him.
4. He will have a better marketing angle.
5. He would be able to profit from sideline businesses.
6. He will have better access to deals from his students who work in different fields.
7. He will be in a position to get credit loans. (not in the US)
8. He will have a stronger chance at a great legacy.
9. He would be able produce videos & books which will sell.
10. He can form a media image. etc, etc,

All this is possible with a very large student base of 200 or more active students. Trust me, one student's enlightenment won't help pay the bills. I have found any Instructor today who claims they care about the money, or they just love to teach, or its not about the quantity, but the quality, or they don't care as long as they have just one student they are happy,, is either lying to themselves or to others.
What Instructor doesn't want many students???? There are some Instructors who, when faced with more than 15 students in a class, can't control the class. I have seen hundreds of Instructors in my time. From South Africa to East Africa, from California to Cincinnati I have traveled, and there are so many 2nd rate Instructors. The problem is not their Kenpo, it's their attitude towards doing what it takes to advance their student numbers. Many just don't want to improve their teaching skills. Their Ego won't allow them to take up classes. They think just because they are Blackbelts they are automatically good Instructors and Administrators. This is failed thinking.




www.kkfkenpo.110mb.com
www.africansportkarate.110mb.com
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

January 18th, 2011, 9:59 pm #8

I'm stunned..

The way you are talking is exactly the reason why the average student in most circumstances today is flakey..

You know Amen I never talk down on other martial artists as a rule but I am so tired of the crap you vomit up I am going to do it just this once and I hope it never happens again...

Oh forget it.. I cannot bring myself to do it..

Have a great day Amen! You are the man! Your kenpo is impeccible and all of your students are dead on kenpoists! You have influenced the art to such a great extent that you should be a grandmaster. I am humbled by your excellence and Humility. Could I rub your feet or something? Make you a lemonade? Touch your garment and receive your spirit?

Lobsang
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 18th, 2011, 11:52 pm #9

""The only real power is, is how much difference they make in any one single student in terms of their knowledge base and excecution.""

What the hell does that mean? Did you just make that up off the top of your head just to create an argument???

"""in any one student???"""
One is never enough....

I'm talking in the context of the Martial Art World. Daa! The more students an Instructor has the more respect he commands. The more power he has.
1. Tournament Promoters will seek him out.
2. Equipment companies will make deals with him.
3. His competitors will keep off him.
4. He will have a better marketing angle.
5. He would be able to profit from sideline businesses.
6. He will have better access to deals from his students who work in different fields.
7. He will be in a position to get credit loans. (not in the US)
8. He will have a stronger chance at a great legacy.
9. He would be able produce videos & books which will sell.
10. He can form a media image. etc, etc,

All this is possible with a very large student base of 200 or more active students. Trust me, one student's enlightenment won't help pay the bills. I have found any Instructor today who claims they care about the money, or they just love to teach, or its not about the quantity, but the quality, or they don't care as long as they have just one student they are happy,, is either lying to themselves or to others.
What Instructor doesn't want many students???? There are some Instructors who, when faced with more than 15 students in a class, can't control the class. I have seen hundreds of Instructors in my time. From South Africa to East Africa, from California to Cincinnati I have traveled, and there are so many 2nd rate Instructors. The problem is not their Kenpo, it's their attitude towards doing what it takes to advance their student numbers. Many just don't want to improve their teaching skills. Their Ego won't allow them to take up classes. They think just because they are Blackbelts they are automatically good Instructors and Administrators. This is failed thinking.




www.kkfkenpo.110mb.com
www.africansportkarate.110mb.com
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
"The more students an Instructor has the more respect he commands. The more power he has."

Amen, I respect you and what you've done. The quote above from you shows only me, myself and I thinking. When you are an instructor it isn't about you - it's about your students and what you can do for them. Whether it's 2 students or 200 is irrelevant.

I don't teach for me. I teach for my students! Money is not the issue - trust me. I've been teaching 13 years and haven't ranked a black belt yet. I still have two people who have been with me from the beginning. Does it look like I'm after money? I'm after teaching students who want to learn how to be the best they are capable of becoming.

Take care!

Michael Miller, CKF
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Joined: October 21st, 2010, 5:15 pm

January 19th, 2011, 2:25 am #10

Does anyone else see the irony here? ROFlMAO


Good Journey,
Todd Durgan
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