What is wrong with Kenpo? Part 2

What is wrong with Kenpo? Part 2

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 7th, 2010, 5:16 pm #1

It also doesn't take a genius to see many computer warriors on this site. I have personally come across it quite often. You know, those keyboard tough guys who act like they are invincible, but in reality have never been in a real encounter. Usually they are under ranks trying to step into an arena they are not prepared for.

So I say, less computer toughness and more mat time.

The other problem I see is that many Kenpoists have traditionalized our system. Big problem.

Anyway, time to get into my next series of questions: (be honest)

- How often do you actually train (physical training)?
- What kind of physical training does that entail?
- How much time is spent on those different areas of training?
- Do you teach? If so, how often do you teach?
- If you teach, do you work out with your students, or just tell them what to do?

Thank-you!

My hypothesis is that most people talk Kenpo a heck of a lot more than they physically train it.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

January 7th, 2010, 5:36 pm #2

If you look at the number of hours most train you are correct Michael I have a feeling...

Sort of like taking out time to read a book on the subject and how much training you do also...

Brings to mind a Sgt I knew and trained with on the Universal machines in days of old...

As we sat around in between sets allowing another to use the side you just finished up on...

He sat down and read the Bible.

I asked him about it, (I went station to station very fast for cardio and different area of muscles) did not sit around much in those days...

He mentioned he was training his body and training his mind by reading words that helped him daily...

He was older and somewhat tired of the streets and prayed a lot...Helped him and others I noticed...

Is that good or bad? Not judging, just asking...

Most that were similar to him did not work the streets as much as others, I noticed...Complex situation to be sure.

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 7th, 2010, 5:50 pm #3

I feel reading, and thinking are two vital areas of Kenpo for sure. I read often, think more than I read, and constantly find ways to better my Kenpo, as well as my students' Kenpo.

My thing is that you need to parallel that with smart and constant physical training.

What I was referring to, however, were those who talk more than they train. They tell you how bad your Kenpo is, how great they are, how they could take you and your instructor, how they are the only one's who know Kenpo properly, and so on. Most of the time it's on forums, so you could replace the word talk with type.

I teach full-time and train often. I teach 18 group classes and 8 private classes per week on average; I train everyday. Some days I take it easier than others, but I do work many drills on my own, do 1000 push-ups per day (taking a day off here and there), hit the heavy bag every day, do focus mitt training with my kickboxing and MMA students a couple times per week, spar (stand-up) at least once per week, spar MMA style at least once per week, do rhythm drills daily, interaction drills a few times per week, run a technique line once per week (myself included, obviously), go over my sets several ways a few times per week, go over my forms (not very often, LOL), shadowbox just about everyday, and I think that about sums it up.
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Joined: June 13th, 2005, 7:25 pm

January 7th, 2010, 6:10 pm #4

It also doesn't take a genius to see many computer warriors on this site. I have personally come across it quite often. You know, those keyboard tough guys who act like they are invincible, but in reality have never been in a real encounter. Usually they are under ranks trying to step into an arena they are not prepared for.

So I say, less computer toughness and more mat time.

The other problem I see is that many Kenpoists have traditionalized our system. Big problem.

Anyway, time to get into my next series of questions: (be honest)

- How often do you actually train (physical training)?
- What kind of physical training does that entail?
- How much time is spent on those different areas of training?
- Do you teach? If so, how often do you teach?
- If you teach, do you work out with your students, or just tell them what to do?

Thank-you!

My hypothesis is that most people talk Kenpo a heck of a lot more than they physically train it.
Good post Michael.

I would also add to the list how much mat time is spent with your instructor and or peers (equal skill or better martial artists).

I think that is very important to help keep us in check and allow us to work on ideas and grow in the art.

So since I decided to comment I will also answer your questions.


"- How often do you actually train (physical training)?"

---- usually 4 days a week and several seminars a year

"- What kind of physical training does that entail?"

---- kenpo with both my instructor and also my students in addition to the gym (resistance and cardio) Side note: I lost 50 lbs. this year

"- How much time is spent on those different areas of training?"

---- kenpo with my instructor is usually from 7 until 9 twice a week and from 545 to 715 with my students twice a week. the gym is roughly an hour 3 days per week. I have a full time job and three children that does not allow for more training than that. When I was younger I trained alot more.

"- Do you teach? If so, how often do you teach?"

---- twice a week locally, every other Saturday at a friends school in Miami and several seminars and impromptu training during the year.

"- If you teach, do you work out with your students, or just tell them what to do?"

---- I give them feedback and show the technique and make corrections during their training. You can learn alot by teaching and the 3rd person perspective.


What all this has taught me is this is a lifelong journey so no rush, no end in site, take your time and focus!

Salute!

Martin

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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

January 7th, 2010, 6:12 pm #5

I feel reading, and thinking are two vital areas of Kenpo for sure. I read often, think more than I read, and constantly find ways to better my Kenpo, as well as my students' Kenpo.

My thing is that you need to parallel that with smart and constant physical training.

What I was referring to, however, were those who talk more than they train. They tell you how bad your Kenpo is, how great they are, how they could take you and your instructor, how they are the only one's who know Kenpo properly, and so on. Most of the time it's on forums, so you could replace the word talk with type.

I teach full-time and train often. I teach 18 group classes and 8 private classes per week on average; I train everyday. Some days I take it easier than others, but I do work many drills on my own, do 1000 push-ups per day (taking a day off here and there), hit the heavy bag every day, do focus mitt training with my kickboxing and MMA students a couple times per week, spar (stand-up) at least once per week, spar MMA style at least once per week, do rhythm drills daily, interaction drills a few times per week, run a technique line once per week (myself included, obviously), go over my sets several ways a few times per week, go over my forms (not very often, LOL), shadowbox just about everyday, and I think that about sums it up.
Your attitude is correct IMHO...Pushups are very good.

My granddaugter takes after her dad (my son) does 100 Pushups over the day and situps also fastest girl in her age group in school and then some... Very athletic...

My son was similar, grandsons did a lot of Push ups. I did also especially in the Corps...Was typical training...

I prefer the weight machines, have for a long time...

Pushups became a punishment, I think LOL...

If I did pushups now I would prefer to do 1000 from the knees it is easier on my old back..Inflames some...

I keep very good care of it in all my training, isolation and working it for strength...

You have answered most, but not the one I asked...

Good routine...Keep it up I have...To a degree.

Gary
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 7th, 2010, 6:21 pm #6

I apologize for not answering your question. What was your question

I know you asked, is that good or bad? What were you referring to? The fellow praying?
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

January 7th, 2010, 7:00 pm #7

What happened a lot of the time is these folks did a lot of it and preaching but were never there when it hit the fan...

So do they turn for strength from weakness in ownself?

Your thoughts would be good.

Always been a wonder for me considering when in the alley or going through a door where shots have been fired why would they be so fearful?

It is complex for sure and I have seen way to much of the ones who sent me and others in and stood behind...

One made it up to Deputy Chief LOL...

Gary
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

January 7th, 2010, 7:42 pm #8

It also doesn't take a genius to see many computer warriors on this site. I have personally come across it quite often. You know, those keyboard tough guys who act like they are invincible, but in reality have never been in a real encounter. Usually they are under ranks trying to step into an arena they are not prepared for.

So I say, less computer toughness and more mat time.

The other problem I see is that many Kenpoists have traditionalized our system. Big problem.

Anyway, time to get into my next series of questions: (be honest)

- How often do you actually train (physical training)?
- What kind of physical training does that entail?
- How much time is spent on those different areas of training?
- Do you teach? If so, how often do you teach?
- If you teach, do you work out with your students, or just tell them what to do?

Thank-you!

My hypothesis is that most people talk Kenpo a heck of a lot more than they physically train it.
I posted these eight questions more than ten years ago. Thankfully, my top black belt saved them on his computer and forwarded them to me:

1) Does your instructor personally warm up the classes or does he either assign that task to someone else or merely walk around and count numbers?

2) Does your instructor consistently place himself in an arena wherein his students are free to attack him without the instructor having a prior knowledge of what's coming? That is, does your instructor frequently and willingly put himself in an environment where he has to show his ability to react spontaneously?

3) Does your instructor spar with his students and other belts of his own rank and higher?

4) Does your instructor enter tournaments in sparring, mass attack, and katas where he can publicly display his talent in a spontaneous arena where he is under pressure?

5) Does your instructor continually suggest to you through subtle implication that there is "more to learn" about kenpo and that he is the one who has this knowledge to pass onto you when you're ready?

6) Does your instructor spend time putting down other kenpoists, implying that for whatever reason (usually unspoken) that Mr. Parker saw fit to award black belts to a group of individuals who didn't deserve them?

7) Does your instructor put forth the notion that there exist hard and fast lines of separation in the kenpo community, that is, "old school" and "new school," which implies in a condescending fashion that over the years Ed Parker went from unenlightened to enlightened?

8) Does your instructor make a big deal over black belt rank and question the validity of other black belts who hold rank either equal to or above his?
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 7th, 2010, 8:36 pm #9

What happened a lot of the time is these folks did a lot of it and preaching but were never there when it hit the fan...

So do they turn for strength from weakness in ownself?

Your thoughts would be good.

Always been a wonder for me considering when in the alley or going through a door where shots have been fired why would they be so fearful?

It is complex for sure and I have seen way to much of the ones who sent me and others in and stood behind...

One made it up to Deputy Chief LOL...

Gary
"What happened a lot of the time is these folks did a lot of it and preaching but were never there when it hit the fan..."

Hmmm. Interesting. Many people do that. Not just Christians--or those who pray to "their" god. Many preach, not so many actually practice. The bible tells us to be like Christ--to actually live, meaning do. Christians are supposed to witness, but should do it properly. I am not into preaching to others about accepting Christ as their Lord and Savior; I am more into allowing others see Him work through me.

I can tell you that I believe in standing up for what's right and I am willing to fight for what's right. I also believe in praying and that prayer is powerful. I trust in my faith and I do pray, but will never hide from something I feel I should face.

"So do they turn for strength from weakness in ownself?"

Many do. We can only do so much on our own. Our spiritual strength is much more powerful than physical and mental strength. What can't be accomplished on our level can be through Christ.

I can tell you that when I feel weak in any way, shape, or form, I pray about it and I find strength in Christ. I can't speak for others, however.


"Always been a wonder for me considering when in the alley or going through a door where shots have been fired why would they be so fearful?"

Prabably because bullets hurt. Also, a real Christian knows that God will not do everything--we have to do our part. If you stand in front of a firing gun and expect God to reach down and catch the bullets, it won't happen. In fact, he probably thinks your pretty dumb for standing there.

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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

January 7th, 2010, 8:49 pm #10

Very good I might add...

Well you do have to take chances sometimes always trying to be careful though, when crossing the street...



Gary
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