What is the "Ultimate goal of kenpo"?

What is the "Ultimate goal of kenpo"?

Joined: April 10th, 2005, 11:41 pm

January 19th, 2011, 10:00 pm #1

The topic was circulating lately so I asked my instructor (Ron "Doc" Chapel) and he responded with what I thought should be shared. What follows is his response to me:

"Elongate circles and round off corners is the ultimate aim of Kenpo, right?

I had a conversation with Mr. Parker about that very thing. He asked me out of the blue one day that question. Turns out it was a "set up," as he was prone to do.

He said one evening while we were having a private dinner alone, "Hey! What's the ultimate aim of Kenpo." Being a student who listened intently to everything Mr. Parker had ever uttered, I said with a know-it-all smirk on my face, "To elongate circles and round off corners." "Really?" He said. "Where in the world did you get such a dumb idea?"

As I stuttered and attempted to regain what little composure I had left, he continued, "You came from Ark Wong, so I know you know just how complex human movement is, right?" I said, "Yes of course." "Than," he said, "why in the world do you think a simple phrase could cover all of the ideas of Kenpo? Do you really think you could boil it down to something that simple?"

He went on to talk about how people love to quote him without understanding the context of what he was saying. That dinner conversation is the source of the quote in my forum signature; "It is always easier to quote, than to know."

Sometimes elongated circles are good, sometimes bad. Sometimes rounded corners work, and sometimes they are a bad idea, and neither teaches you how to do anything. Nothing is that simple.

Ultimately he shared that while the phrase had merit, it was only a simple idea to get beginners moving, and knowledgeable students should know better. I knew better from that moment on, to listen intently but also learned that Mr. Parker would bait you into a position, attack you for it even though the source was himself, make you defend it, than ultimately agree or disagree depending upon how well you defended your position.

I leaned to NEVER, EVER quote Ed Parker to Ed Parker
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

January 19th, 2011, 11:12 pm #2

and I wonder if the Universal Pattern was in the minds or conversation during that meal.

Clark
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Joined: February 28th, 2004, 1:04 am

January 20th, 2011, 5:42 am #3

The topic was circulating lately so I asked my instructor (Ron "Doc" Chapel) and he responded with what I thought should be shared. What follows is his response to me:

"Elongate circles and round off corners is the ultimate aim of Kenpo, right?

I had a conversation with Mr. Parker about that very thing. He asked me out of the blue one day that question. Turns out it was a "set up," as he was prone to do.

He said one evening while we were having a private dinner alone, "Hey! What's the ultimate aim of Kenpo." Being a student who listened intently to everything Mr. Parker had ever uttered, I said with a know-it-all smirk on my face, "To elongate circles and round off corners." "Really?" He said. "Where in the world did you get such a dumb idea?"

As I stuttered and attempted to regain what little composure I had left, he continued, "You came from Ark Wong, so I know you know just how complex human movement is, right?" I said, "Yes of course." "Than," he said, "why in the world do you think a simple phrase could cover all of the ideas of Kenpo? Do you really think you could boil it down to something that simple?"

He went on to talk about how people love to quote him without understanding the context of what he was saying. That dinner conversation is the source of the quote in my forum signature; "It is always easier to quote, than to know."

Sometimes elongated circles are good, sometimes bad. Sometimes rounded corners work, and sometimes they are a bad idea, and neither teaches you how to do anything. Nothing is that simple.

Ultimately he shared that while the phrase had merit, it was only a simple idea to get beginners moving, and knowledgeable students should know better. I knew better from that moment on, to listen intently but also learned that Mr. Parker would bait you into a position, attack you for it even though the source was himself, make you defend it, than ultimately agree or disagree depending upon how well you defended your position.

I leaned to NEVER, EVER quote Ed Parker to Ed Parker
Plausible deniability.....

Rich
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Joined: April 10th, 2005, 11:41 pm

January 21st, 2011, 12:54 am #4

I've always found you a smart guy, so you must realize that your statement can be applied in a number of ways. So what did you intend? Speak freely, please.
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Joined: February 28th, 2004, 1:04 am

January 21st, 2011, 4:18 am #5

Just like in many self defense/offense scenarios......except with verbals (s)kills:

Give them something that causes them to commit, then respond with something that has multiple contexts that draws out their true intent.....

Then, when you are sure of their position,after you set them up, you can respond in a manner that keeps them off balance having to change up or defend their position while you maintain control and direction of the dialogue.....

Lawyers are notorious for this!!!!

Rich
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

January 21st, 2011, 4:18 pm #6

...politicians
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 8:54 am

January 21st, 2011, 8:12 pm #7

The topic was circulating lately so I asked my instructor (Ron "Doc" Chapel) and he responded with what I thought should be shared. What follows is his response to me:

"Elongate circles and round off corners is the ultimate aim of Kenpo, right?

I had a conversation with Mr. Parker about that very thing. He asked me out of the blue one day that question. Turns out it was a "set up," as he was prone to do.

He said one evening while we were having a private dinner alone, "Hey! What's the ultimate aim of Kenpo." Being a student who listened intently to everything Mr. Parker had ever uttered, I said with a know-it-all smirk on my face, "To elongate circles and round off corners." "Really?" He said. "Where in the world did you get such a dumb idea?"

As I stuttered and attempted to regain what little composure I had left, he continued, "You came from Ark Wong, so I know you know just how complex human movement is, right?" I said, "Yes of course." "Than," he said, "why in the world do you think a simple phrase could cover all of the ideas of Kenpo? Do you really think you could boil it down to something that simple?"

He went on to talk about how people love to quote him without understanding the context of what he was saying. That dinner conversation is the source of the quote in my forum signature; "It is always easier to quote, than to know."

Sometimes elongated circles are good, sometimes bad. Sometimes rounded corners work, and sometimes they are a bad idea, and neither teaches you how to do anything. Nothing is that simple.

Ultimately he shared that while the phrase had merit, it was only a simple idea to get beginners moving, and knowledgeable students should know better. I knew better from that moment on, to listen intently but also learned that Mr. Parker would bait you into a position, attack you for it even though the source was himself, make you defend it, than ultimately agree or disagree depending upon how well you defended your position.

I leaned to NEVER, EVER quote Ed Parker to Ed Parker
rational students whom are mentally balanced





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HcIAUpaPXc

Last edited by kenpo58 on January 21st, 2011, 8:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 10th, 2005, 6:38 pm

January 22nd, 2011, 7:14 am #8

The topic was circulating lately so I asked my instructor (Ron "Doc" Chapel) and he responded with what I thought should be shared. What follows is his response to me:

"Elongate circles and round off corners is the ultimate aim of Kenpo, right?

I had a conversation with Mr. Parker about that very thing. He asked me out of the blue one day that question. Turns out it was a "set up," as he was prone to do.

He said one evening while we were having a private dinner alone, "Hey! What's the ultimate aim of Kenpo." Being a student who listened intently to everything Mr. Parker had ever uttered, I said with a know-it-all smirk on my face, "To elongate circles and round off corners." "Really?" He said. "Where in the world did you get such a dumb idea?"

As I stuttered and attempted to regain what little composure I had left, he continued, "You came from Ark Wong, so I know you know just how complex human movement is, right?" I said, "Yes of course." "Than," he said, "why in the world do you think a simple phrase could cover all of the ideas of Kenpo? Do you really think you could boil it down to something that simple?"

He went on to talk about how people love to quote him without understanding the context of what he was saying. That dinner conversation is the source of the quote in my forum signature; "It is always easier to quote, than to know."

Sometimes elongated circles are good, sometimes bad. Sometimes rounded corners work, and sometimes they are a bad idea, and neither teaches you how to do anything. Nothing is that simple.

Ultimately he shared that while the phrase had merit, it was only a simple idea to get beginners moving, and knowledgeable students should know better. I knew better from that moment on, to listen intently but also learned that Mr. Parker would bait you into a position, attack you for it even though the source was himself, make you defend it, than ultimately agree or disagree depending upon how well you defended your position.

I leaned to NEVER, EVER quote Ed Parker to Ed Parker
...Kenpo is merely a tool. Like any other tool, it's just a means to an end, and because Kenpo is used by many different people, in many different ways, to achieve many different goals, there isn't an "ultimate goal of kenpo."

...and even if there was, it would have to be assumed that we all agree what kenpo is...


Troy


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Joined: January 19th, 2004, 2:11 am

January 23rd, 2011, 2:25 am #9

At the end of a confrontation, you go home, and the other combatant/s goes to the hospital or morgue.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 1:19 pm

January 23rd, 2011, 8:32 am #10

The topic was circulating lately so I asked my instructor (Ron "Doc" Chapel) and he responded with what I thought should be shared. What follows is his response to me:

"Elongate circles and round off corners is the ultimate aim of Kenpo, right?

I had a conversation with Mr. Parker about that very thing. He asked me out of the blue one day that question. Turns out it was a "set up," as he was prone to do.

He said one evening while we were having a private dinner alone, "Hey! What's the ultimate aim of Kenpo." Being a student who listened intently to everything Mr. Parker had ever uttered, I said with a know-it-all smirk on my face, "To elongate circles and round off corners." "Really?" He said. "Where in the world did you get such a dumb idea?"

As I stuttered and attempted to regain what little composure I had left, he continued, "You came from Ark Wong, so I know you know just how complex human movement is, right?" I said, "Yes of course." "Than," he said, "why in the world do you think a simple phrase could cover all of the ideas of Kenpo? Do you really think you could boil it down to something that simple?"

He went on to talk about how people love to quote him without understanding the context of what he was saying. That dinner conversation is the source of the quote in my forum signature; "It is always easier to quote, than to know."

Sometimes elongated circles are good, sometimes bad. Sometimes rounded corners work, and sometimes they are a bad idea, and neither teaches you how to do anything. Nothing is that simple.

Ultimately he shared that while the phrase had merit, it was only a simple idea to get beginners moving, and knowledgeable students should know better. I knew better from that moment on, to listen intently but also learned that Mr. Parker would bait you into a position, attack you for it even though the source was himself, make you defend it, than ultimately agree or disagree depending upon how well you defended your position.

I leaned to NEVER, EVER quote Ed Parker to Ed Parker
the goal of Kenpo is to never stop reproducing itself, and to take care of the students within its Art.

www.kkfkenpo.110mb.com
www.africansportkarate.110mb.com
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
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