What does it mean to side with Reason, over Passion?

What does it mean to side with Reason, over Passion?

Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

August 7th, 2008, 3:14 pm #1

As martial artists, some part of us is habitually plugged in to the nature of the Warrior Spirit. Whether the arts cultivated it in us, or our character drew us to the arts, for any "lifers", it's predictably there.

One of the aspects of the Warrior Spirit is to feel passionately about our beliefs, and defend those interests with action. The function of the Warrior is not to question why, but to act on behalf of loyalties; and with great heart.

Unfortunately, "passion" also feeds "drama". Such that the martial arts becomes a fertile ground for the drama created when passionate minds interact. To say that "every story has 2 sides" is to minimize the number of people touched by that story. The kenpo story has many, many sides. Some positions and perspectives may be more legitimately held than others, but ultimately, it eventually boils down to passions about positions.

Every once in awhile, these passions blow up in an intriguing display of fireworks. Great drama, fueled by great passion. Often, when these explosions are run past people not involved, they look both silly, and unecessary. Moreover, the reasoned positions (as opposed to the passionate ones) will sometimes have been avoided.

Passion fuels drama, which seperates parties and fuels fractionation and discord. But it also fuels the heart of the warrior to take action in the face of lifes challenges. By applying reason, we might be able to identify a position from which reasoned action, fueled by the fire of the warriors passion, can drive effects that serve the interests of all involved, at least partially.

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Joined: May 2nd, 2008, 9:56 pm

August 7th, 2008, 5:08 pm #2

The warrior days are over and so is passion. Were just a bunch of people that have had the finincial privilage to take karate lessons. There aint much more to it than that. I mean it is fun and all. IO mean this aint like it's life and death like feudal japan or pediatric neurosurgery. So Yah...It;s an art and it's cool and fun and you learn to defend yourself. But lets not get to serious about this.
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Joined: July 15th, 2008, 3:09 am

August 7th, 2008, 5:22 pm #3

With all due respect the warrior days are not over! Maybe the ancient times are but, we need men and women to rise up and stand for something to fight for what we(they) believe in.

One of our major problems today is we dont take a stand. We are so afraid of hurting someones feelings or not being PC.

If we want to have the things we love then we stand up and fight for them.

Think of OUR men and women fighting for freedom and serving our country. Are they not warriors?

Respect,

Norm

"Guts are the anesthesia that deaden the pain of fear." - Ed Parker
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Joined: January 30th, 2005, 4:30 am

August 7th, 2008, 5:23 pm #4

The warrior days are over and so is passion. Were just a bunch of people that have had the finincial privilage to take karate lessons. There aint much more to it than that. I mean it is fun and all. IO mean this aint like it's life and death like feudal japan or pediatric neurosurgery. So Yah...It;s an art and it's cool and fun and you learn to defend yourself. But lets not get to serious about this.
"I mean it is fun and all. IO mean this aint like it's life and death like feudal japan or pediatric neurosurgery."

All depends on where you live.... Come to Philly and walk the streets of North and/or West Philly.

Carrie Yaffe
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Joined: May 2nd, 2008, 9:56 pm

August 7th, 2008, 5:34 pm #5

I was raised in West Philly. And in Millbourne and Upper Darby. Before I lived in Singapore.
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Joined: January 30th, 2005, 4:30 am

August 7th, 2008, 6:11 pm #6

Then you know what I'm talking about. Not sure how long ago that was, but I can tell you this, it sure hasn't gotten any better.

Killadelphia... can't wait to get out and I live in the "suburbs" of Philly.

Carrie Yaffe
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Joined: August 27th, 2004, 8:34 am

August 7th, 2008, 6:33 pm #7

As martial artists, some part of us is habitually plugged in to the nature of the Warrior Spirit. Whether the arts cultivated it in us, or our character drew us to the arts, for any "lifers", it's predictably there.

One of the aspects of the Warrior Spirit is to feel passionately about our beliefs, and defend those interests with action. The function of the Warrior is not to question why, but to act on behalf of loyalties; and with great heart.

Unfortunately, "passion" also feeds "drama". Such that the martial arts becomes a fertile ground for the drama created when passionate minds interact. To say that "every story has 2 sides" is to minimize the number of people touched by that story. The kenpo story has many, many sides. Some positions and perspectives may be more legitimately held than others, but ultimately, it eventually boils down to passions about positions.

Every once in awhile, these passions blow up in an intriguing display of fireworks. Great drama, fueled by great passion. Often, when these explosions are run past people not involved, they look both silly, and unecessary. Moreover, the reasoned positions (as opposed to the passionate ones) will sometimes have been avoided.

Passion fuels drama, which seperates parties and fuels fractionation and discord. But it also fuels the heart of the warrior to take action in the face of lifes challenges. By applying reason, we might be able to identify a position from which reasoned action, fueled by the fire of the warriors passion, can drive effects that serve the interests of all involved, at least partially.
I can count on one hand the people I met that had/have the warrior spirit.

Warriors believe in action, and living their life by a certain code. They do not bicker or tilt at windmills. They are men of action when action is required. They may use words in their battles but prefer leaving words to the politicians of the world.

When I think of a warrior's spirit, I think of the old proverb; "Speak softly and carry a big stick." (the phrase advises the tactic of caution and non-aggression, backed up by the ability to do violence if required)

Zoran Sevic
http://www.martial-links.com
http://www.martialartsindustry.net
http://www.kenpothoughts.com
http://www.myspace.com/zoransevic
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Joined: June 17th, 2006, 1:33 am

August 7th, 2008, 6:42 pm #8

Sorry but there's irony there.

A politician made that phrase famous.

I'm not disagreeing. I'm cursed with the overwhelming urge to point at irony and laugh.

CT

but that's just my opinion I could be wrong.
Dennis Miller
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Joined: April 12th, 2007, 3:30 am

August 7th, 2008, 6:43 pm #9

The warrior days are over and so is passion. Were just a bunch of people that have had the finincial privilage to take karate lessons. There aint much more to it than that. I mean it is fun and all. IO mean this aint like it's life and death like feudal japan or pediatric neurosurgery. So Yah...It;s an art and it's cool and fun and you learn to defend yourself. But lets not get to serious about this.
Just because the "Warrior Days" are over, doesn't have to mean that the warrior way of life and/or mentality has to be as well. Many things in our society are throwbacks to an earlier time, but are still preserved, either as an oddity or eccentricity or as an important piece of culture and lifestyle.

For some of us, the ways of the ancient warriors speak to us, and living by that code is something that gives us fulfillment and direction in life. Is it for everyone? Of course not, but to belittle those who do, especially in its relationship with the martial arts that we pursue/teach/learn, speaks volumes of your own character.

Sean
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Joined: May 2nd, 2008, 9:56 pm

August 7th, 2008, 6:53 pm #10

I never claimed to have good charactor. I am basically a loser and a jerk. But I know a bit about fighting though. And my moves are pretty darn good. But I am a person with no charactor. That is true.

Yeah...Charactor. I remember when I was in second grade and sould not do math. So I would just go up to turn in my paper and when the teacher was not looking I would erase another kids name from their test and write mine in and put their name on my test.
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