Time: the fourth dimension

Time: the fourth dimension

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 3:51 pm #1

I have been asked below to expand upon this topic. Since I have a few minutes I will do so. This may end up being quite long, but I will try to keep it as brief as possible.

As we know, American Kenpo is a thinking persons art based on science. We use many different analogies to understand our concepts and principles in order to put a reality context to not only thought, but also proper action. Although many people tend to call it paralysis of analysis, (I do agree that some people are too caught up in over analyzing that they lack the physical dimension or they cant put their brain into physical use with their body) but, Kenpo as a multi-dimensional art/science, requires a multi-dimensional mindset and practice.

Ultimately, Kenpo can be broken down into three parts: (1) Academic (2) Combative (3) Sport. Although, the realm of Kenpo consists of these three parts, there are those who focus on one aspect. If we look at our salutation, we know that it shows us all along that the warrior and the scholar come together as one, back to back. At one point the warrior becomes a scholar. We know that there are those who are just scholars and those who are just warriors, but the ultimate realm is to parallel the two within yourself. The system of Kenpo allows one to have his/her own signature, or style if you will. Some will be sport oriented, some will be combat oriented, and others will focus more on the intellectual realm of why things work the way they do.

I believe, however, that to be great at either sport or combat (the physical aspect of the art), you have to have a balance point with the academic side to understand why things work the way they do, especially if you are an instructor. I am a combative person (which is why I have gone in the direction of Mr. Pick's teachings under the recommendation and guidance of my primary instructor Mr. Kelley). That is my journey. Although I have a sport background, my growth in my personal Kenpo is purely combative. To me, I cant understand the physical realities of combat without going greatly in depth with the academic side of Kenpo, the side that really intrigues me.

I know that many people don't care about the academics and say, "Just hit the guy." That is not my journey. My journey is to understand what makes the realities of our system effective, which stems from the laws of the universe, consisting primarily of physics and geometry. So, because of this, my Kenpo has vastly improved. I will make the attempt to create the understanding of the fourth dimension (time) so that all can possibly use it to their advantage.

There are those in Kenpo who are fantasy thinkers. If I wanted fantasy I would go to Disneyland. I am a reality thinker and base all things I know about our system on why something holds true. For that, we must look at science. It has been said that we live in a three dimensional world. That is a pure given. The three dimensions being: height, width, and length (depth). Because of this Mr. Parker in his analytical study of motion brought out that our three dimensions are height, width, and depth.

It was Einstein with his theory of relativity, however, that opened the doors to the reality of time. It showed that the three dimensions of space possessed a definite relationship with the dimension of time. Shortly after Einsteins theory in 1905, Hermann Minkowski (a German mathematician) became one of the first scientists to recognize the significance of this theory from a mathematical perspective. With his mathematics, the four dimensions of what is known as "space-time" became impossible to separate from each other for they were all part of the same universe.

The term "space-time" can be described as such: space is the medium in which time happens and time dictates what happens in that medium. Whether its the electrons that orbit the nucleus in a part of your body, the vehicle that takes you places, or the hair that grows on your head, they all need two things to happen: space and time. Space is the first three dimensions and time is the dimension that sets it into action. Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time.

Lets look at this from its root. Time can be defined only by measurement. The measurement of time is based on reoccurring natural phenomena. For example, a year is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make one complete revolution around the Sun. A day is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make once complete revolution on its axis. The year and the day are then broken down into more arbitrary units: months, hours, seconds, and so on.

I could get much further in depth and talk about work, which we know is used to express the forces applied to an object set in motion (which requires time); power which is the rate of doing work and is expressed by the amount of work done divided by the time it takes to do the work; speed, which is the rate at which something moves (s=d/t); velocity, which is the speed in a particular direction known as a vector quantity (velocity may change with time as an object changes either its speed or its direction); and more, but I think we all get the picture by now.

So, in Kenpo, we have the three physical dimensions that take up space (height, width, and depth), but we also have the dimension known as time, which is the byproduct of all action, or vice-versa. With that being said it can be looked at in several ways. Clyde explained that if you cancel the physical dimensions (let us keep in mind that time could also be considered physical because our physical mass cannot act without time; the only issue is that time cannot be seen, whereas the space dimensions can) that it creates more time for your follow up action. I say that is a great way to view it, but not the only way.

Time is an ultimate sphere around our physical being at all times as it is in everything we do; but to look at it in the context of the fourth dimension, we must view it as how it relates to the three space dimensions which was what Clyde described. In this context we must also look at it from all views (our own, our opponent/enemy/attacker, and the bystanders). We must also look at from the power principles of torque, marriage of gravity, and back up mass. We need to try to minimize the time it takes to act throughout our space dimensions, but maximize the time allowed to act by canceling the attackers space dimensions. We know that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, which requires time (possible pause sets) to act accordingly. If my Kenpo is effective I will cause enough damage to manipulate the attackers physical body allowing me to take advantage of the fourth dimension through economy of motion as I act off the attackers reaction.

That is a start for you. I could write a novel on this very subject and I have rambled long enough. There are other ways to understand this dimension and I encourage you all to look for those ways.

Thank-you for your patience!

Michael Miller, CKF

PS. As a writer I needed to edit a handful of times.
Last edited by millhouse23 on April 23rd, 2009, 4:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 1st, 2005, 10:53 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 5:56 pm #2

oh yeah, well now im jumpin in my dalorian and goin strait to 88...

nice though with the space time stuff. I did learn a little something from that.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 5:59 pm #3

I was speaking of physical space and the domain of time (hence the four dimensions), not outer space or any form of time travel (that's a whole new ball game).

Cheers!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 7th, 2007, 2:23 am

April 23rd, 2009, 6:46 pm #4

I have been asked below to expand upon this topic. Since I have a few minutes I will do so. This may end up being quite long, but I will try to keep it as brief as possible.

As we know, American Kenpo is a thinking persons art based on science. We use many different analogies to understand our concepts and principles in order to put a reality context to not only thought, but also proper action. Although many people tend to call it paralysis of analysis, (I do agree that some people are too caught up in over analyzing that they lack the physical dimension or they cant put their brain into physical use with their body) but, Kenpo as a multi-dimensional art/science, requires a multi-dimensional mindset and practice.

Ultimately, Kenpo can be broken down into three parts: (1) Academic (2) Combative (3) Sport. Although, the realm of Kenpo consists of these three parts, there are those who focus on one aspect. If we look at our salutation, we know that it shows us all along that the warrior and the scholar come together as one, back to back. At one point the warrior becomes a scholar. We know that there are those who are just scholars and those who are just warriors, but the ultimate realm is to parallel the two within yourself. The system of Kenpo allows one to have his/her own signature, or style if you will. Some will be sport oriented, some will be combat oriented, and others will focus more on the intellectual realm of why things work the way they do.

I believe, however, that to be great at either sport or combat (the physical aspect of the art), you have to have a balance point with the academic side to understand why things work the way they do, especially if you are an instructor. I am a combative person (which is why I have gone in the direction of Mr. Pick's teachings under the recommendation and guidance of my primary instructor Mr. Kelley). That is my journey. Although I have a sport background, my growth in my personal Kenpo is purely combative. To me, I cant understand the physical realities of combat without going greatly in depth with the academic side of Kenpo, the side that really intrigues me.

I know that many people don't care about the academics and say, "Just hit the guy." That is not my journey. My journey is to understand what makes the realities of our system effective, which stems from the laws of the universe, consisting primarily of physics and geometry. So, because of this, my Kenpo has vastly improved. I will make the attempt to create the understanding of the fourth dimension (time) so that all can possibly use it to their advantage.

There are those in Kenpo who are fantasy thinkers. If I wanted fantasy I would go to Disneyland. I am a reality thinker and base all things I know about our system on why something holds true. For that, we must look at science. It has been said that we live in a three dimensional world. That is a pure given. The three dimensions being: height, width, and length (depth). Because of this Mr. Parker in his analytical study of motion brought out that our three dimensions are height, width, and depth.

It was Einstein with his theory of relativity, however, that opened the doors to the reality of time. It showed that the three dimensions of space possessed a definite relationship with the dimension of time. Shortly after Einsteins theory in 1905, Hermann Minkowski (a German mathematician) became one of the first scientists to recognize the significance of this theory from a mathematical perspective. With his mathematics, the four dimensions of what is known as "space-time" became impossible to separate from each other for they were all part of the same universe.

The term "space-time" can be described as such: space is the medium in which time happens and time dictates what happens in that medium. Whether its the electrons that orbit the nucleus in a part of your body, the vehicle that takes you places, or the hair that grows on your head, they all need two things to happen: space and time. Space is the first three dimensions and time is the dimension that sets it into action. Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time.

Lets look at this from its root. Time can be defined only by measurement. The measurement of time is based on reoccurring natural phenomena. For example, a year is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make one complete revolution around the Sun. A day is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make once complete revolution on its axis. The year and the day are then broken down into more arbitrary units: months, hours, seconds, and so on.

I could get much further in depth and talk about work, which we know is used to express the forces applied to an object set in motion (which requires time); power which is the rate of doing work and is expressed by the amount of work done divided by the time it takes to do the work; speed, which is the rate at which something moves (s=d/t); velocity, which is the speed in a particular direction known as a vector quantity (velocity may change with time as an object changes either its speed or its direction); and more, but I think we all get the picture by now.

So, in Kenpo, we have the three physical dimensions that take up space (height, width, and depth), but we also have the dimension known as time, which is the byproduct of all action, or vice-versa. With that being said it can be looked at in several ways. Clyde explained that if you cancel the physical dimensions (let us keep in mind that time could also be considered physical because our physical mass cannot act without time; the only issue is that time cannot be seen, whereas the space dimensions can) that it creates more time for your follow up action. I say that is a great way to view it, but not the only way.

Time is an ultimate sphere around our physical being at all times as it is in everything we do; but to look at it in the context of the fourth dimension, we must view it as how it relates to the three space dimensions which was what Clyde described. In this context we must also look at it from all views (our own, our opponent/enemy/attacker, and the bystanders). We must also look at from the power principles of torque, marriage of gravity, and back up mass. We need to try to minimize the time it takes to act throughout our space dimensions, but maximize the time allowed to act by canceling the attackers space dimensions. We know that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, which requires time (possible pause sets) to act accordingly. If my Kenpo is effective I will cause enough damage to manipulate the attackers physical body allowing me to take advantage of the fourth dimension through economy of motion as I act off the attackers reaction.

That is a start for you. I could write a novel on this very subject and I have rambled long enough. There are other ways to understand this dimension and I encourage you all to look for those ways.

Thank-you for your patience!

Michael Miller, CKF

PS. As a writer I needed to edit a handful of times.
"Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time."

I know I don't have the mass to direct any of the vectors involved with changing or distorting known space or time. As far as I can tell, actual space and time will remain constant due to my interaction with it.

I will review your statement. And though I don't see your theory, I'm not aurguing against it. But I respect your position.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 9th, 2006, 6:27 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 7:14 pm #5

I have been asked below to expand upon this topic. Since I have a few minutes I will do so. This may end up being quite long, but I will try to keep it as brief as possible.

As we know, American Kenpo is a thinking persons art based on science. We use many different analogies to understand our concepts and principles in order to put a reality context to not only thought, but also proper action. Although many people tend to call it paralysis of analysis, (I do agree that some people are too caught up in over analyzing that they lack the physical dimension or they cant put their brain into physical use with their body) but, Kenpo as a multi-dimensional art/science, requires a multi-dimensional mindset and practice.

Ultimately, Kenpo can be broken down into three parts: (1) Academic (2) Combative (3) Sport. Although, the realm of Kenpo consists of these three parts, there are those who focus on one aspect. If we look at our salutation, we know that it shows us all along that the warrior and the scholar come together as one, back to back. At one point the warrior becomes a scholar. We know that there are those who are just scholars and those who are just warriors, but the ultimate realm is to parallel the two within yourself. The system of Kenpo allows one to have his/her own signature, or style if you will. Some will be sport oriented, some will be combat oriented, and others will focus more on the intellectual realm of why things work the way they do.

I believe, however, that to be great at either sport or combat (the physical aspect of the art), you have to have a balance point with the academic side to understand why things work the way they do, especially if you are an instructor. I am a combative person (which is why I have gone in the direction of Mr. Pick's teachings under the recommendation and guidance of my primary instructor Mr. Kelley). That is my journey. Although I have a sport background, my growth in my personal Kenpo is purely combative. To me, I cant understand the physical realities of combat without going greatly in depth with the academic side of Kenpo, the side that really intrigues me.

I know that many people don't care about the academics and say, "Just hit the guy." That is not my journey. My journey is to understand what makes the realities of our system effective, which stems from the laws of the universe, consisting primarily of physics and geometry. So, because of this, my Kenpo has vastly improved. I will make the attempt to create the understanding of the fourth dimension (time) so that all can possibly use it to their advantage.

There are those in Kenpo who are fantasy thinkers. If I wanted fantasy I would go to Disneyland. I am a reality thinker and base all things I know about our system on why something holds true. For that, we must look at science. It has been said that we live in a three dimensional world. That is a pure given. The three dimensions being: height, width, and length (depth). Because of this Mr. Parker in his analytical study of motion brought out that our three dimensions are height, width, and depth.

It was Einstein with his theory of relativity, however, that opened the doors to the reality of time. It showed that the three dimensions of space possessed a definite relationship with the dimension of time. Shortly after Einsteins theory in 1905, Hermann Minkowski (a German mathematician) became one of the first scientists to recognize the significance of this theory from a mathematical perspective. With his mathematics, the four dimensions of what is known as "space-time" became impossible to separate from each other for they were all part of the same universe.

The term "space-time" can be described as such: space is the medium in which time happens and time dictates what happens in that medium. Whether its the electrons that orbit the nucleus in a part of your body, the vehicle that takes you places, or the hair that grows on your head, they all need two things to happen: space and time. Space is the first three dimensions and time is the dimension that sets it into action. Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time.

Lets look at this from its root. Time can be defined only by measurement. The measurement of time is based on reoccurring natural phenomena. For example, a year is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make one complete revolution around the Sun. A day is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make once complete revolution on its axis. The year and the day are then broken down into more arbitrary units: months, hours, seconds, and so on.

I could get much further in depth and talk about work, which we know is used to express the forces applied to an object set in motion (which requires time); power which is the rate of doing work and is expressed by the amount of work done divided by the time it takes to do the work; speed, which is the rate at which something moves (s=d/t); velocity, which is the speed in a particular direction known as a vector quantity (velocity may change with time as an object changes either its speed or its direction); and more, but I think we all get the picture by now.

So, in Kenpo, we have the three physical dimensions that take up space (height, width, and depth), but we also have the dimension known as time, which is the byproduct of all action, or vice-versa. With that being said it can be looked at in several ways. Clyde explained that if you cancel the physical dimensions (let us keep in mind that time could also be considered physical because our physical mass cannot act without time; the only issue is that time cannot be seen, whereas the space dimensions can) that it creates more time for your follow up action. I say that is a great way to view it, but not the only way.

Time is an ultimate sphere around our physical being at all times as it is in everything we do; but to look at it in the context of the fourth dimension, we must view it as how it relates to the three space dimensions which was what Clyde described. In this context we must also look at it from all views (our own, our opponent/enemy/attacker, and the bystanders). We must also look at from the power principles of torque, marriage of gravity, and back up mass. We need to try to minimize the time it takes to act throughout our space dimensions, but maximize the time allowed to act by canceling the attackers space dimensions. We know that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, which requires time (possible pause sets) to act accordingly. If my Kenpo is effective I will cause enough damage to manipulate the attackers physical body allowing me to take advantage of the fourth dimension through economy of motion as I act off the attackers reaction.

That is a start for you. I could write a novel on this very subject and I have rambled long enough. There are other ways to understand this dimension and I encourage you all to look for those ways.

Thank-you for your patience!

Michael Miller, CKF

PS. As a writer I needed to edit a handful of times.
..."Time waits for no one, and it won't wait for me. " From the album It's only rock n roll
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 7:18 pm #6

"Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time."

I know I don't have the mass to direct any of the vectors involved with changing or distorting known space or time. As far as I can tell, actual space and time will remain constant due to my interaction with it.

I will review your statement. And though I don't see your theory, I'm not aurguing against it. But I respect your position.
I am not presenting a theory. This is reality. I will say, however, I stated that our "relationship" with space and time changes, not the fact that we are actually changing space and time (although we could). Time is constant in all things, but it is also constantly changing. As for space, the space our mass occupies changes with each motion.

Thanks for your feedback, however. Again, I could elaborate further and further, but I'm quite busy.

Michael Miller, CKF
Last edited by millhouse23 on April 23rd, 2009, 7:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 1st, 2005, 10:53 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 9:02 pm #7

I was speaking of physical space and the domain of time (hence the four dimensions), not outer space or any form of time travel (that's a whole new ball game).

Cheers!
obviously
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 5th, 2005, 2:18 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 9:23 pm #8

..."Time waits for no one, and it won't wait for me. " From the album It's only rock n roll
yes it is.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 5th, 2004, 6:37 pm

April 24th, 2009, 2:18 am #9

I have been asked below to expand upon this topic. Since I have a few minutes I will do so. This may end up being quite long, but I will try to keep it as brief as possible.

As we know, American Kenpo is a thinking persons art based on science. We use many different analogies to understand our concepts and principles in order to put a reality context to not only thought, but also proper action. Although many people tend to call it paralysis of analysis, (I do agree that some people are too caught up in over analyzing that they lack the physical dimension or they cant put their brain into physical use with their body) but, Kenpo as a multi-dimensional art/science, requires a multi-dimensional mindset and practice.

Ultimately, Kenpo can be broken down into three parts: (1) Academic (2) Combative (3) Sport. Although, the realm of Kenpo consists of these three parts, there are those who focus on one aspect. If we look at our salutation, we know that it shows us all along that the warrior and the scholar come together as one, back to back. At one point the warrior becomes a scholar. We know that there are those who are just scholars and those who are just warriors, but the ultimate realm is to parallel the two within yourself. The system of Kenpo allows one to have his/her own signature, or style if you will. Some will be sport oriented, some will be combat oriented, and others will focus more on the intellectual realm of why things work the way they do.

I believe, however, that to be great at either sport or combat (the physical aspect of the art), you have to have a balance point with the academic side to understand why things work the way they do, especially if you are an instructor. I am a combative person (which is why I have gone in the direction of Mr. Pick's teachings under the recommendation and guidance of my primary instructor Mr. Kelley). That is my journey. Although I have a sport background, my growth in my personal Kenpo is purely combative. To me, I cant understand the physical realities of combat without going greatly in depth with the academic side of Kenpo, the side that really intrigues me.

I know that many people don't care about the academics and say, "Just hit the guy." That is not my journey. My journey is to understand what makes the realities of our system effective, which stems from the laws of the universe, consisting primarily of physics and geometry. So, because of this, my Kenpo has vastly improved. I will make the attempt to create the understanding of the fourth dimension (time) so that all can possibly use it to their advantage.

There are those in Kenpo who are fantasy thinkers. If I wanted fantasy I would go to Disneyland. I am a reality thinker and base all things I know about our system on why something holds true. For that, we must look at science. It has been said that we live in a three dimensional world. That is a pure given. The three dimensions being: height, width, and length (depth). Because of this Mr. Parker in his analytical study of motion brought out that our three dimensions are height, width, and depth.

It was Einstein with his theory of relativity, however, that opened the doors to the reality of time. It showed that the three dimensions of space possessed a definite relationship with the dimension of time. Shortly after Einsteins theory in 1905, Hermann Minkowski (a German mathematician) became one of the first scientists to recognize the significance of this theory from a mathematical perspective. With his mathematics, the four dimensions of what is known as "space-time" became impossible to separate from each other for they were all part of the same universe.

The term "space-time" can be described as such: space is the medium in which time happens and time dictates what happens in that medium. Whether its the electrons that orbit the nucleus in a part of your body, the vehicle that takes you places, or the hair that grows on your head, they all need two things to happen: space and time. Space is the first three dimensions and time is the dimension that sets it into action. Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time.

Lets look at this from its root. Time can be defined only by measurement. The measurement of time is based on reoccurring natural phenomena. For example, a year is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make one complete revolution around the Sun. A day is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make once complete revolution on its axis. The year and the day are then broken down into more arbitrary units: months, hours, seconds, and so on.

I could get much further in depth and talk about work, which we know is used to express the forces applied to an object set in motion (which requires time); power which is the rate of doing work and is expressed by the amount of work done divided by the time it takes to do the work; speed, which is the rate at which something moves (s=d/t); velocity, which is the speed in a particular direction known as a vector quantity (velocity may change with time as an object changes either its speed or its direction); and more, but I think we all get the picture by now.

So, in Kenpo, we have the three physical dimensions that take up space (height, width, and depth), but we also have the dimension known as time, which is the byproduct of all action, or vice-versa. With that being said it can be looked at in several ways. Clyde explained that if you cancel the physical dimensions (let us keep in mind that time could also be considered physical because our physical mass cannot act without time; the only issue is that time cannot be seen, whereas the space dimensions can) that it creates more time for your follow up action. I say that is a great way to view it, but not the only way.

Time is an ultimate sphere around our physical being at all times as it is in everything we do; but to look at it in the context of the fourth dimension, we must view it as how it relates to the three space dimensions which was what Clyde described. In this context we must also look at it from all views (our own, our opponent/enemy/attacker, and the bystanders). We must also look at from the power principles of torque, marriage of gravity, and back up mass. We need to try to minimize the time it takes to act throughout our space dimensions, but maximize the time allowed to act by canceling the attackers space dimensions. We know that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, which requires time (possible pause sets) to act accordingly. If my Kenpo is effective I will cause enough damage to manipulate the attackers physical body allowing me to take advantage of the fourth dimension through economy of motion as I act off the attackers reaction.

That is a start for you. I could write a novel on this very subject and I have rambled long enough. There are other ways to understand this dimension and I encourage you all to look for those ways.

Thank-you for your patience!

Michael Miller, CKF

PS. As a writer I needed to edit a handful of times.
You write that time is the 4th dimension, separate from the three dimensions of space. Time is not separate from space, which is why it is termed space-time, a 4 dimensional entity. When you travel in space, you travel in time and vice-versa. When you pause to allow an opponent to react, you are waiting for his reaction through space, which takes time. They are not separate entities.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 20th, 2006, 6:21 pm

April 24th, 2009, 2:37 am #10

I have been asked below to expand upon this topic. Since I have a few minutes I will do so. This may end up being quite long, but I will try to keep it as brief as possible.

As we know, American Kenpo is a thinking persons art based on science. We use many different analogies to understand our concepts and principles in order to put a reality context to not only thought, but also proper action. Although many people tend to call it paralysis of analysis, (I do agree that some people are too caught up in over analyzing that they lack the physical dimension or they cant put their brain into physical use with their body) but, Kenpo as a multi-dimensional art/science, requires a multi-dimensional mindset and practice.

Ultimately, Kenpo can be broken down into three parts: (1) Academic (2) Combative (3) Sport. Although, the realm of Kenpo consists of these three parts, there are those who focus on one aspect. If we look at our salutation, we know that it shows us all along that the warrior and the scholar come together as one, back to back. At one point the warrior becomes a scholar. We know that there are those who are just scholars and those who are just warriors, but the ultimate realm is to parallel the two within yourself. The system of Kenpo allows one to have his/her own signature, or style if you will. Some will be sport oriented, some will be combat oriented, and others will focus more on the intellectual realm of why things work the way they do.

I believe, however, that to be great at either sport or combat (the physical aspect of the art), you have to have a balance point with the academic side to understand why things work the way they do, especially if you are an instructor. I am a combative person (which is why I have gone in the direction of Mr. Pick's teachings under the recommendation and guidance of my primary instructor Mr. Kelley). That is my journey. Although I have a sport background, my growth in my personal Kenpo is purely combative. To me, I cant understand the physical realities of combat without going greatly in depth with the academic side of Kenpo, the side that really intrigues me.

I know that many people don't care about the academics and say, "Just hit the guy." That is not my journey. My journey is to understand what makes the realities of our system effective, which stems from the laws of the universe, consisting primarily of physics and geometry. So, because of this, my Kenpo has vastly improved. I will make the attempt to create the understanding of the fourth dimension (time) so that all can possibly use it to their advantage.

There are those in Kenpo who are fantasy thinkers. If I wanted fantasy I would go to Disneyland. I am a reality thinker and base all things I know about our system on why something holds true. For that, we must look at science. It has been said that we live in a three dimensional world. That is a pure given. The three dimensions being: height, width, and length (depth). Because of this Mr. Parker in his analytical study of motion brought out that our three dimensions are height, width, and depth.

It was Einstein with his theory of relativity, however, that opened the doors to the reality of time. It showed that the three dimensions of space possessed a definite relationship with the dimension of time. Shortly after Einsteins theory in 1905, Hermann Minkowski (a German mathematician) became one of the first scientists to recognize the significance of this theory from a mathematical perspective. With his mathematics, the four dimensions of what is known as "space-time" became impossible to separate from each other for they were all part of the same universe.

The term "space-time" can be described as such: space is the medium in which time happens and time dictates what happens in that medium. Whether its the electrons that orbit the nucleus in a part of your body, the vehicle that takes you places, or the hair that grows on your head, they all need two things to happen: space and time. Space is the first three dimensions and time is the dimension that sets it into action. Therefore, as our motion changes, so does our relationship with space and time.

Lets look at this from its root. Time can be defined only by measurement. The measurement of time is based on reoccurring natural phenomena. For example, a year is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make one complete revolution around the Sun. A day is defined as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to make once complete revolution on its axis. The year and the day are then broken down into more arbitrary units: months, hours, seconds, and so on.

I could get much further in depth and talk about work, which we know is used to express the forces applied to an object set in motion (which requires time); power which is the rate of doing work and is expressed by the amount of work done divided by the time it takes to do the work; speed, which is the rate at which something moves (s=d/t); velocity, which is the speed in a particular direction known as a vector quantity (velocity may change with time as an object changes either its speed or its direction); and more, but I think we all get the picture by now.

So, in Kenpo, we have the three physical dimensions that take up space (height, width, and depth), but we also have the dimension known as time, which is the byproduct of all action, or vice-versa. With that being said it can be looked at in several ways. Clyde explained that if you cancel the physical dimensions (let us keep in mind that time could also be considered physical because our physical mass cannot act without time; the only issue is that time cannot be seen, whereas the space dimensions can) that it creates more time for your follow up action. I say that is a great way to view it, but not the only way.

Time is an ultimate sphere around our physical being at all times as it is in everything we do; but to look at it in the context of the fourth dimension, we must view it as how it relates to the three space dimensions which was what Clyde described. In this context we must also look at it from all views (our own, our opponent/enemy/attacker, and the bystanders). We must also look at from the power principles of torque, marriage of gravity, and back up mass. We need to try to minimize the time it takes to act throughout our space dimensions, but maximize the time allowed to act by canceling the attackers space dimensions. We know that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, which requires time (possible pause sets) to act accordingly. If my Kenpo is effective I will cause enough damage to manipulate the attackers physical body allowing me to take advantage of the fourth dimension through economy of motion as I act off the attackers reaction.

That is a start for you. I could write a novel on this very subject and I have rambled long enough. There are other ways to understand this dimension and I encourage you all to look for those ways.

Thank-you for your patience!

Michael Miller, CKF

PS. As a writer I needed to edit a handful of times.
Maybe Rod knows something we don't.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzlG28B-R8Y

Quote
Like
Share