Specifics in Teaching

Specifics in Teaching

Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

May 17th, 2010, 3:14 am #1

More thoughts from Larry:

The following is an example of not being specific in one's teaching.

Just using common words that have floated around for years may draw attention to what you are trying to teach but when you do get the attention of the one you are teaching....be specific.

This is one of the main things we as Kenpoists are taught early in our training. In any progressive learning system, it is important to understand that what you say, how you say it and when you say it becomes part of the cycle of learning. The wrong choice of words may take the student off into another realm of thinking and out of sync with what is being taught in accordance to building upon one precept after another.

In my new book, I talk about how teachers use words that they think are leading the student to full understanding. One term most often used is kind of or kinda. Well you just kind of do it this way or kinda like this and so forth. Try not to use words that are not specific to the lesson.

When I received my pilot's license, do you think my flight instructor (knowing it meant my life and possibly the life of others to fly correctly) would use the word kinda or kind of? Yes, perhaps after you learn how to fly or learn Kenpo you can say to your friends well it's kinda ...

The five words of Kenpo every teacher should use are no, yes, stop, OK, and maybe. No means no, yes means yes, stop means stop, OK means OK, and not anything else. But...yes there is one word that represents kinda/kind of and that word is maybe

Think about it, you guys, before your next lesson you are going to teach.

Ed Parker told me and others early on, "Martial arts ARE categorized into systems but that martial arts WERE NOT categorized into one system"...until now.

I categorize all known basics, concepts and principles, then prioritize them into what we now call American Kenpo. But remember, this system must be taught in a specific manner so as not to overlook any one of the aforementioned parameters. How do we do this? We become specific in our teaching.

Larry Tatum

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 17th, 2010, 2:42 pm #2

I can see why some don't care to teach progressive folks...
Difference between English language, and Latin...

I understand about the pilots reference for sure...

Seat of the pants was another situation, some could think of...

It all comes down to adapt, improvise, overcome, and hopefully prevail...Or not!!!

So it is hard when you are taught rigids, and then on the spot, come up with own thinking...

Monday morning quarterback is a term...Many on the line really dislike...

http://www.yourdictionary.com/monday-mo ... uarterback

The Corps comes to mind about teaching, specifics...Then you have, saying above regarding improvising...

Statement used many a time "if the Corps wanted you married, they would have issued you a wife"...

Teaching is interesting for sure...

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 1:19 pm

May 18th, 2010, 7:22 am #3

More thoughts from Larry:

The following is an example of not being specific in one's teaching.

Just using common words that have floated around for years may draw attention to what you are trying to teach but when you do get the attention of the one you are teaching....be specific.

This is one of the main things we as Kenpoists are taught early in our training. In any progressive learning system, it is important to understand that what you say, how you say it and when you say it becomes part of the cycle of learning. The wrong choice of words may take the student off into another realm of thinking and out of sync with what is being taught in accordance to building upon one precept after another.

In my new book, I talk about how teachers use words that they think are leading the student to full understanding. One term most often used is kind of or kinda. Well you just kind of do it this way or kinda like this and so forth. Try not to use words that are not specific to the lesson.

When I received my pilot's license, do you think my flight instructor (knowing it meant my life and possibly the life of others to fly correctly) would use the word kinda or kind of? Yes, perhaps after you learn how to fly or learn Kenpo you can say to your friends well it's kinda ...

The five words of Kenpo every teacher should use are no, yes, stop, OK, and maybe. No means no, yes means yes, stop means stop, OK means OK, and not anything else. But...yes there is one word that represents kinda/kind of and that word is maybe

Think about it, you guys, before your next lesson you are going to teach.

Ed Parker told me and others early on, "Martial arts ARE categorized into systems but that martial arts WERE NOT categorized into one system"...until now.

I categorize all known basics, concepts and principles, then prioritize them into what we now call American Kenpo. But remember, this system must be taught in a specific manner so as not to overlook any one of the aforementioned parameters. How do we do this? We become specific in our teaching.

Larry Tatum

Back to the mats,

Angela
Here are a few of my thoughts on teaching.

1. It is very important to build a trust between you and the student as early as possible. That is why I tell my Head Instructors not to give new members to Assistant Instructors right away. So in my KKF clubs you will see 3rd and 4th Degree Blackbelts teaching a guy basic stances and blocks.

2. I always sell Kenpo's benefits to my students. I drive it home in little huddles I call once or twice during my classes. I turn on the dramatics so they can also feel what I am saying. They then have lots of info to use when talking about the Arts to others. It is important to the student to have positive info on the Art's benefits.

3. A good Instructor takes the time to know his students on a more personal level. I don't mean be friends with them, but on the floor they should know them. I always make a point of calling out a student's name, when they do things I like, or dislike. A student feels he is cared for when his Instructor calls his name out.

Lastly: I spar with all my students regularly. Talking to them and giving the encouragement. It really brings us close, and we are so happy to go through that experience together.

</i> The only real power an Instructor has is the number of students he has and can maintain. <i> think about it...



www.kkfkenpo.110mb.com
www.africansportkarate.110mb.com
kkfkenpo@yahoo.com
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 19th, 2010, 12:18 am #4

More thoughts from Larry:

The following is an example of not being specific in one's teaching.

Just using common words that have floated around for years may draw attention to what you are trying to teach but when you do get the attention of the one you are teaching....be specific.

This is one of the main things we as Kenpoists are taught early in our training. In any progressive learning system, it is important to understand that what you say, how you say it and when you say it becomes part of the cycle of learning. The wrong choice of words may take the student off into another realm of thinking and out of sync with what is being taught in accordance to building upon one precept after another.

In my new book, I talk about how teachers use words that they think are leading the student to full understanding. One term most often used is kind of or kinda. Well you just kind of do it this way or kinda like this and so forth. Try not to use words that are not specific to the lesson.

When I received my pilot's license, do you think my flight instructor (knowing it meant my life and possibly the life of others to fly correctly) would use the word kinda or kind of? Yes, perhaps after you learn how to fly or learn Kenpo you can say to your friends well it's kinda ...

The five words of Kenpo every teacher should use are no, yes, stop, OK, and maybe. No means no, yes means yes, stop means stop, OK means OK, and not anything else. But...yes there is one word that represents kinda/kind of and that word is maybe

Think about it, you guys, before your next lesson you are going to teach.

Ed Parker told me and others early on, "Martial arts ARE categorized into systems but that martial arts WERE NOT categorized into one system"...until now.

I categorize all known basics, concepts and principles, then prioritize them into what we now call American Kenpo. But remember, this system must be taught in a specific manner so as not to overlook any one of the aforementioned parameters. How do we do this? We become specific in our teaching.

Larry Tatum

Back to the mats,

Angela
Larry mentioned:

In my new book, I talk about how teachers use words that they think are leading the student to full understanding. One term most often used is kind of or kinda. Well you just kind of do it this way or kinda like this and so forth. Try not to use words that are not specific to the lesson.
********

When will "book", be available for purchase???

Gary
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

May 19th, 2010, 2:07 am #5

But I will check and see if there is an estimated print and release date.

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 23rd, 2010, 4:49 pm #6

I had a feeling maybe he was involved some???

Gary
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

May 24th, 2010, 4:30 pm #7

No he's not.

No sure how you would come to that conclusion/assumption.

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 24th, 2010, 4:40 pm #8

At location, and is an English Professor...

Gary
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:04 pm

May 24th, 2010, 7:48 pm #9

He's written other books while in Robert's presence,

Wasn't part of them either.

Larry's quite capable of writing on his own without the need of an English prof for guidance.

Larry trains varying people of varying professions. Doesn't means he helps them with their work?

Back to the mats,

Angela
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 24th, 2010, 7:59 pm #10

But many who come to learn are good at other things...

I assisted several with construction over the decades I practiced...

Maybe I should have mentioned editing, rather than allowing it to be about, writing...

Regards,
Gary
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