RE: Michael Miller's Article in July's IKF

RE: Michael Miller's Article in July's IKF

Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:13 pm

May 17th, 2008, 2:23 am #1

Hi folks!
I purchased this issue and read Mr. Miller's Article "honor thy father" and had to comment on a innaccurate statement.
In the article,Mr. Miller states that "When Parker died, so did the IKKA".
This particular point needs to be clarified.
After Mr. Parker's death, the Parker Family,lead by his widow, Margarit Leilani Parker, strived to keep his memory and the art he created alive. They worked to continue his tournament , The International Karate Championships alive and focused on keeping the IKKA alive through those who willingly chose to stay in the association that Ed Parker himself had founded. Rather than creating their own groups,These kenpoists strived to perpectuate Mr. Parker's memory & material as it was created by him during his lifespan. The IKKA continued to exist until April 2004:14 years after Mr. Parker's untimely death. I stayed with the IKKA because of a personal promise I made to Mr. Parker and kept to that promise until the IKKA was no longer in existance.
I understand how to many,they feel that when the man died the organization died with him. But, as the symbol for the IKC itself stands for,There were others who chose to "keep the flame burning" by staying in the International Kenpo Karate Association.
Thank you for your time,
Joseph P. Rebelo II
KENPOJOE
PS: Mr. Miller also states that the "Chinese Kenpo Federation" is a front runner of organizations. I'm sure he was actually refering to the "Chinese Karate Federation".
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 17th, 2008, 2:38 am #2

Joe, I have read that Mills Crenshaw was very important in the founding of the IKKA. Mills posts at San Jose Kenpo site quite a bit.

This is something I would like you to read "IKKA" stuff is about 5/8s of the way down. Any thoughts about it?

http://www.kenpokarate.com/ikka.html

Not stirring, asking for your input since you mentioned it, I thought it might be a good time to ask.

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:13 pm

May 17th, 2008, 2:50 am #3

Dear Gary,
Your question has absolutely nothing to do with my post.
If you want to ask about Mr. Wil Tracy's series of articles,do so as a seperate thread.
BEGOOD,
KENPOJOE
PS: Please be specific in regards to what you are refering to as well.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 17th, 2008, 2:57 am #4

Joe,
Would it be better over at SJK where Mills posts? Then it could get hashed around some?

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

May 17th, 2008, 1:59 pm #5

Hi folks!
I purchased this issue and read Mr. Miller's Article "honor thy father" and had to comment on a innaccurate statement.
In the article,Mr. Miller states that "When Parker died, so did the IKKA".
This particular point needs to be clarified.
After Mr. Parker's death, the Parker Family,lead by his widow, Margarit Leilani Parker, strived to keep his memory and the art he created alive. They worked to continue his tournament , The International Karate Championships alive and focused on keeping the IKKA alive through those who willingly chose to stay in the association that Ed Parker himself had founded. Rather than creating their own groups,These kenpoists strived to perpectuate Mr. Parker's memory & material as it was created by him during his lifespan. The IKKA continued to exist until April 2004:14 years after Mr. Parker's untimely death. I stayed with the IKKA because of a personal promise I made to Mr. Parker and kept to that promise until the IKKA was no longer in existance.
I understand how to many,they feel that when the man died the organization died with him. But, as the symbol for the IKC itself stands for,There were others who chose to "keep the flame burning" by staying in the International Kenpo Karate Association.
Thank you for your time,
Joseph P. Rebelo II
KENPOJOE
PS: Mr. Miller also states that the "Chinese Kenpo Federation" is a front runner of organizations. I'm sure he was actually refering to the "Chinese Karate Federation".
Everyone,

First of all, I am a member of the Chinese Karate Federation, not the Chinese Kenpo Federation. Let's think about this: Do you honestly believe that I don't know the name of my own organization? There were two instances in the article that it said Chinese Kenpo Federation and two where it said the proper Chinese Karate Federation. The two areas where it read Chinese Kenpo were typos done by the editors of the magazine, not me. They put it in the sub-title and wrote their own statement of "the Chinese Kenpo Federation is said to be the front runner." It's obvious I did not write that sentence since toward the end of the article you will read, "no Kenpo organization is the best," which I did write. When you write for magazines, you don't get to proof read their edited versions. I have an excellent relationship with the editor of "Inside Kung-fu" so they rarely edit anything I write.

I am glad they screwed that sentence up, however, because it proves I didn't write it. I know for a fact that no organization is the head honcho organization in our system. So please understand I did not say the CKF is said to be the best, nor did I lead anyone to believe that.

I also noticed on a different forum where someone thought the article was meant to recruit CKF members. That statement is completely false. We do not solicit for members. They contact us and we interview them. We don't chase people. If the article was promoting anything, it was the growing alliance.

Lastly, about the death of the IKKA. That statment I made was backed up by several seniors in this system. I apologize Mr. Rebelo if you disagree, but that is your opinion. I take eight opinions from those who were there as a fact. If you get 3 or more people stating the same thing it can usually be considered accurate. I knew that the IKKA continued long after Mr. Parker's death, but it was not the same. It was left without an accepted leader. You can find out more in Rainer Schulte's biography that I am working. I suggest you purchase that when it is available.

If I can answer anybody else's questions about that article, please fire away. Any article I write for "Black Belt" and "Inside Kung-fu" are solely to promote American Kenpo and perpetuate the founder of our great system. Although most people love to criticize I feel I do the best I can do to promote our art.

Salute,

Michael Miller
CKF Public Relations Administrator


PS. Mr. Rebelo, did you purchase a physics 101 book yet? (LOL)
Last edited by millhouse23 on May 17th, 2008, 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 9th, 2007, 11:54 pm

May 17th, 2008, 2:31 pm #6

Hi folks!
I purchased this issue and read Mr. Miller's Article "honor thy father" and had to comment on a innaccurate statement.
In the article,Mr. Miller states that "When Parker died, so did the IKKA".
This particular point needs to be clarified.
After Mr. Parker's death, the Parker Family,lead by his widow, Margarit Leilani Parker, strived to keep his memory and the art he created alive. They worked to continue his tournament , The International Karate Championships alive and focused on keeping the IKKA alive through those who willingly chose to stay in the association that Ed Parker himself had founded. Rather than creating their own groups,These kenpoists strived to perpectuate Mr. Parker's memory & material as it was created by him during his lifespan. The IKKA continued to exist until April 2004:14 years after Mr. Parker's untimely death. I stayed with the IKKA because of a personal promise I made to Mr. Parker and kept to that promise until the IKKA was no longer in existance.
I understand how to many,they feel that when the man died the organization died with him. But, as the symbol for the IKC itself stands for,There were others who chose to "keep the flame burning" by staying in the International Kenpo Karate Association.
Thank you for your time,
Joseph P. Rebelo II
KENPOJOE
PS: Mr. Miller also states that the "Chinese Kenpo Federation" is a front runner of organizations. I'm sure he was actually refering to the "Chinese Karate Federation".
I will start by saying that everything in the Inside Kung Fu article was great and I agree with it. I was one who was closely working with Master Parker to fix the IKKA structure the last couple of years before his passing, I have the paperwork of the organizational structure and the list of individuals that Mr. Parker was considering for the 20-25, what he called disciples, at the time, for lack of a better term. I also have the list of whom he was considering for regional directors at the time. Unfortunalely, we ran out of time. At the time of Master Parker's passing, very few held any titles, mine was IKKA director of New England and later changed to IKKA director of the Northeast. I know Joe Palanzo was East Coast Director. To clarify some statements made on other sites about me, I never left the IKKA , I was removed by Mrs. Parker, for reasons unknown to me. When that happened the IKKA of New England (the strongest region at the time) went from 50 schools to six in just 3 months,so began the death of the IKKA. I have pondered for many years as to when I will write in detail about this and I think it will be with Mr. Miller as author. I hope this helps, Sincerely, Tony Cogliandro
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Joined: February 8th, 2004, 9:00 pm

May 17th, 2008, 2:49 pm #7

Everyone,

First of all, I am a member of the Chinese Karate Federation, not the Chinese Kenpo Federation. Let's think about this: Do you honestly believe that I don't know the name of my own organization? There were two instances in the article that it said Chinese Kenpo Federation and two where it said the proper Chinese Karate Federation. The two areas where it read Chinese Kenpo were typos done by the editors of the magazine, not me. They put it in the sub-title and wrote their own statement of "the Chinese Kenpo Federation is said to be the front runner." It's obvious I did not write that sentence since toward the end of the article you will read, "no Kenpo organization is the best," which I did write. When you write for magazines, you don't get to proof read their edited versions. I have an excellent relationship with the editor of "Inside Kung-fu" so they rarely edit anything I write.

I am glad they screwed that sentence up, however, because it proves I didn't write it. I know for a fact that no organization is the head honcho organization in our system. So please understand I did not say the CKF is said to be the best, nor did I lead anyone to believe that.

I also noticed on a different forum where someone thought the article was meant to recruit CKF members. That statement is completely false. We do not solicit for members. They contact us and we interview them. We don't chase people. If the article was promoting anything, it was the growing alliance.

Lastly, about the death of the IKKA. That statment I made was backed up by several seniors in this system. I apologize Mr. Rebelo if you disagree, but that is your opinion. I take eight opinions from those who were there as a fact. If you get 3 or more people stating the same thing it can usually be considered accurate. I knew that the IKKA continued long after Mr. Parker's death, but it was not the same. It was left without an accepted leader. You can find out more in Rainer Schulte's biography that I am working. I suggest you purchase that when it is available.

If I can answer anybody else's questions about that article, please fire away. Any article I write for "Black Belt" and "Inside Kung-fu" are solely to promote American Kenpo and perpetuate the founder of our great system. Although most people love to criticize I feel I do the best I can do to promote our art.

Salute,

Michael Miller
CKF Public Relations Administrator


PS. Mr. Rebelo, did you purchase a physics 101 book yet? (LOL)
Mr.Miller,
There is one question I have regarding your article. Why all the "grandmaster" titles? Is this something the gents in the article ask to be addressed as? I just have a hard time with these "grand poobah" type handles. I was softly admonished(at a seminar)by Mr.Parker himself when I called one of my (former) instructors(at his insistance)Sensei. I thought as an American system we did not ascribe to these titles, but meant to keep the instructor/student relationship more on level ground? Are'nt the stripes, or bars on the belt enough public recognition? Even if you can't see stripes/bars on a belt someones demonstrated skill should be enough to illicit respect, or no? Please understand that I am not trying to put myself out there as a "shotcaller", but just someone with questions.
Thanks for your time,
1stJohn1:9
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

May 17th, 2008, 3:17 pm #8

One might reasonably argue that keeping the flame would entail pursuing the wishes of the systems' founder. That alone is a sticky wicket, since everyone has their own recollections of what those wishes were. In some cases, however, they were made plain in writing. It was clear to me that grandmaster/sensei titles and such were discouraged. Our preferred options as American Kenpoists are even spelled out for us in the Infinite Insights series, replaced with Associate Professor, Senior Professor, Senior Master of the Arts type titles. GM titles are, to me, a holdover from the Asian influence, and serve little more than the ego preferences of those bearing them.

That's not entirely bad, either. I personally enjoy wondering over the usage of the Chinese honorifics (sigung, sibok, etc.), but get lost trying to track which would be appropriate for whom. Previosly posted definitions haven't helped me; my thinking cap just ain't that big.

I don't think there is anything inherently wrong with the use of them...if one were referred to as a master of his craft after 30 years of woodworking, I don't think anyone would contest the honorific use in that context. If someone chose to call Andre Segovia a grandmaster of his craft, I'm sure few would contest the use of the phrase. However, as kenpoists, my understanding is that we are either to refer to our seniors in writing with thier proper AK titles, or simply as "Mr." or "Sir." That's my default position, until such time as a senior makes his or her personal wishes known to me. I think being too heavily invested in any dogmatic approach borders on silly. Heck, even if II says, "Call them Sir", if they want me to call them "fido", I'll call them fido.

For myself, I just go by "Dave". But tell people to call me anything they want, as long as they don't call me late for dinner.

Best Regards,

Supreme World Great-Grandmaster of Nada Dam-Ting Kung-Fool...Dave. On time for dinner. So far.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 17th, 2008, 3:51 pm #9

Mike,

Did anyone contact Mills Crenshaw, he was involved with the founding of IKKA.

He still post's at San Jose Kenpo forum. Mills would be a good person to ask, or have an opinion from, I would think. I started a thread on the topic IKKA at SJK.

Joe posted at AKF also.

Gary
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

May 17th, 2008, 3:52 pm #10

I will start by saying that everything in the Inside Kung Fu article was great and I agree with it. I was one who was closely working with Master Parker to fix the IKKA structure the last couple of years before his passing, I have the paperwork of the organizational structure and the list of individuals that Mr. Parker was considering for the 20-25, what he called disciples, at the time, for lack of a better term. I also have the list of whom he was considering for regional directors at the time. Unfortunalely, we ran out of time. At the time of Master Parker's passing, very few held any titles, mine was IKKA director of New England and later changed to IKKA director of the Northeast. I know Joe Palanzo was East Coast Director. To clarify some statements made on other sites about me, I never left the IKKA , I was removed by Mrs. Parker, for reasons unknown to me. When that happened the IKKA of New England (the strongest region at the time) went from 50 schools to six in just 3 months,so began the death of the IKKA. I have pondered for many years as to when I will write in detail about this and I think it will be with Mr. Miller as author. I hope this helps, Sincerely, Tony Cogliandro
Tony at anytime did you work with Mills Crenshaw?
Regards,
Gary
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