Kenpo question

Kenpo question

Joined: January 22nd, 2009, 3:09 am

January 22nd, 2009, 7:22 pm #1

Hello everyone I'm New here. My question is does EPAK have any one step sparring like in Tae kwon do? I'm a blackbelt in TKD and I'll be starting Kenpo next week. I know there are SD techniques for each belt, but I don't know about one-steps?

By the way I love this web-site. Thanks in advance.
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Joined: October 21st, 2006, 9:13 pm

January 22nd, 2009, 9:34 pm #2

describe a one step that you would practice if you were wearing your uniform. Then some comparison might be forthcoming.

Welcome to Kenpo by the way.

Clark
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Joined: May 5th, 2006, 12:56 pm

January 22nd, 2009, 10:04 pm #3

Hello everyone I'm New here. My question is does EPAK have any one step sparring like in Tae kwon do? I'm a blackbelt in TKD and I'll be starting Kenpo next week. I know there are SD techniques for each belt, but I don't know about one-steps?

By the way I love this web-site. Thanks in advance.
Ed Parker's Kenpo does have some kind of one-step sparring techniques, although they are quite different from the ones you learn in TKD. We call them Free-Style techniques and they are known as coded techniques. For example we would have a Free Style technique named as B1a. The B would present a base move, which in this case would be a pull at your opponents front arm. The number 1 would present the maneuvre, in this case stationary and the a would present a punch to the face. There are many more of these kind of combinations. These excercises could be compared to the one step sparring techniques in other systems.

Larry Tatum did a DVD on these Free style techniques. I added a clip here which I found on Youtube.

Maybe this helps answer your question

Good luck in your Kenpo journey!

Nice regards,

Richard Baarspul
Jeff Speakman's Kenpo 5.0 - The Netherlands
www.jeffspeakman.nl

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Joined: May 5th, 2006, 12:56 pm

January 22nd, 2009, 10:06 pm #4

Here is a link to the Youtube clip by Larry Tatum on the Kenpo Sparring techniques.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoXD1pM71to
Last edited by thunderinghammers on January 22nd, 2009, 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2009, 3:09 am

January 22nd, 2009, 10:13 pm #5

describe a one step that you would practice if you were wearing your uniform. Then some comparison might be forthcoming.

Welcome to Kenpo by the way.

Clark
Here is the explanation: (Attacker) Attention stance, step forward into a forward stance (Neutral bow) execute a downward block, step forward into a forward stance (Neutral bow) middle punch (Front punch) to mid-section (this is just a formality) this is the attack.

(Defender) Attention stance-well lets say execute an inward block, (to outside of arm) to the punching arm, in a horse stance, and executes a double punch to the ribs. (Block and double punches in a horse stance) Theres only one stance in this technique.

It's only a one punch attack. It's very basic techniques and attacks. We usually have about 3-5 techniques per belt. I know it's not much, but TKD is mainly a kicking Art, Im sure everybody knows that.

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Joined: January 22nd, 2009, 3:09 am

January 22nd, 2009, 10:47 pm #6

Here is a link to the Youtube clip by Larry Tatum on the Kenpo Sparring techniques.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoXD1pM71to
Thunderinghammers,
Yeah that's what I was talking about, but kenpo's is much better, thanks.....
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 25th, 2009, 6:15 am #7

Hello everyone I'm New here. My question is does EPAK have any one step sparring like in Tae kwon do? I'm a blackbelt in TKD and I'll be starting Kenpo next week. I know there are SD techniques for each belt, but I don't know about one-steps?

By the way I love this web-site. Thanks in advance.
For the most part, there are not one steps- but we do have freestyle techniques (yes, insert oxymoron comment here) that some schools teach.

They are not necessarily one-steps but multiple moves that can be applied during sparring. They are listed in the Flame.


Thanks,

Joshua Meredith
KenpoNet Administrator
www.kenponet.com
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 2:34 pm

January 25th, 2009, 5:17 pm #8

One-steps, as I learned them, were just short self-defense techniques. Kenpo has plenty of self-defense techniques. It's what we are known for.

Some of the one-steps I learned were good for sparring, and others were less ring-friendly (more self-defense focused). Different flavors of TKD probably do things differently; I was learning a less sport-oriented flavor. I always thought the beginning kenpo techniques were analogous to the TKD one-steps I learned. (Looking at those one-steps now, I can see the vulnerabilities and missed opportunities that I could not see before kenpo.)

Peace,
Scott

P.S. a bit of a definition note, for those moving from another art to kenpo:

A kenpo basic is a single move, like a punch. Many other arts call this a technique.

A kenpo technique is a set of responses or combos to handle a specific threat, a teaching tool to make the use of basics more effective. There is a huge variety, and designed to bring more insight and learning for the practitioner. They are meant to be done hands-on. They might be called combos in some other arts, though they really aren't the same thing. I have heard that Judo calls the analogous element a form. There are self-defense techniques and free-style techniques, though I'm hard pressed to actually define the difference between the two categories.

A kenpo form is like a form in most other arts, the main difference being that most of our forms are tied pretty directly to specific self-defense techniques, with the applications known, and actively applied on body as part of the process of learning the techs. No interpreting what the masters meant, as some arts have had to do, though there is still plenty of opportuity to explore alternate interpretations of the movement in kenpo forms. Kenpo forms get very complex and very long. Our early-to-mid level forms rival upper level hard style forms for complexity. I don't know how they compare to "soft" or "mixed" styles.

A kenpo set is like a form, but specialized and limited to focus on one specific aspect of the art. Stance Set 1 is a series of stances and transitions, with minimal hand involvement. Striking Set is a series of strikes from a horse stance. Kicking set is a series of kicks. And so forth.

Hope that helps.
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