I have a question

I have a question

Joined: February 1st, 2005, 2:47 pm

June 27th, 2008, 10:50 am #1

I have a question I would like to ask of all the instructors out there.

I have my first crop of students who recently passed their last belt before Black, I would like to write a small book for them with guidelines on what it takes to get your Black Belt, that is apart from the syllabus material, what it IS to be a Black Belt and some general training and practice tips and advice.

The guys in question are junior black belt candidates-in-training ranging in ages from 13 to 15 years old, but I would like the book to be applicable for adults as well.

I was also going to talk about some aspects such as the Formulation Equation and how it fits into your training at this point, the importance of footwork and accuracy, etc.

I would like to ask those of you involved in testing Black Belt candidates what it is you look for during a test.

I was also going to use some really good quotes from Mr Parker as topics to discuss in the book, so if any of you have suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

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Joined: June 1st, 2005, 5:34 am

June 27th, 2008, 5:29 pm #2

I like the idea, when you finish if its possible to get a copy I would love to see what you put together.

After reading this I thought about it and I would say some of the biggest differences between Brown and Black Belts are mental rather then physical, There is not a huge difference in movement, although one should always be improving, but all the major principles and concepts should be in their heads, they should already be self correcting, and should already be able to teach, and spot problems and formulate solutions to those problems for their students.

I would say its important for anyone, but more so for a Black Belt to have a strong sense of what martial arts means to them, what extent they are willing to go to defend themselves or others, how far they are willing to go to put an end to a threat, and how they can brng others to reach their own conclusions for themselves on the very same thing. I do not think its important to decide what morals and ethics my students have, but it is important for me to make them reach conclusions about their own. I think important things are to never be satisfied with the Black Belt, and always striving to learn more, both about their own kenpo, and about other martial arts. I have found out more about my own Kenpo through crosstraining then I ever could have staying in house.

Thats just a bit off the top of my head, not sure if thats what you are looking for or not.
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Joined: May 31st, 2004, 7:32 pm

June 27th, 2008, 5:37 pm #3

I have a question I would like to ask of all the instructors out there.

I have my first crop of students who recently passed their last belt before Black, I would like to write a small book for them with guidelines on what it takes to get your Black Belt, that is apart from the syllabus material, what it IS to be a Black Belt and some general training and practice tips and advice.

The guys in question are junior black belt candidates-in-training ranging in ages from 13 to 15 years old, but I would like the book to be applicable for adults as well.

I was also going to talk about some aspects such as the Formulation Equation and how it fits into your training at this point, the importance of footwork and accuracy, etc.

I would like to ask those of you involved in testing Black Belt candidates what it is you look for during a test.

I was also going to use some really good quotes from Mr Parker as topics to discuss in the book, so if any of you have suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

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My apologies go to you for 'accidentally' turning your thread into a discussion of religion...sorry about that.
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Joined: July 17th, 2007, 12:37 am

June 27th, 2008, 7:41 pm #4

Timmy, I don't know if you should be the one talking about morality, after all, you beat up poor JIMMY who is crippled and has to get around on crutches.

LOL
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Joined: April 28th, 2008, 7:03 pm

June 27th, 2008, 9:12 pm #5

I have a question I would like to ask of all the instructors out there.

I have my first crop of students who recently passed their last belt before Black, I would like to write a small book for them with guidelines on what it takes to get your Black Belt, that is apart from the syllabus material, what it IS to be a Black Belt and some general training and practice tips and advice.

The guys in question are junior black belt candidates-in-training ranging in ages from 13 to 15 years old, but I would like the book to be applicable for adults as well.

I was also going to talk about some aspects such as the Formulation Equation and how it fits into your training at this point, the importance of footwork and accuracy, etc.

I would like to ask those of you involved in testing Black Belt candidates what it is you look for during a test.

I was also going to use some really good quotes from Mr Parker as topics to discuss in the book, so if any of you have suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

LEAVE MORE DENTS
It was taught to me that being a black belt means to be of maximum service to your students and your community and to lead by example. I truly am in awe of the nonsense being said here. Look inside your heart and you will find what is right and what is wrong and pay no mind to foolish and ego driven discusions. My example is Master Bob White and i fallow his example as my students will fallow mine. It is wise to document curriculmn for your students, after all that's how we got here......Right? Best wishes....
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Joined: March 5th, 2005, 2:18 pm

June 28th, 2008, 2:35 am #6

Mr. White is a pretty good example. However if his record of tournament competition, training champions, and service to the comunity were the standard, I don't think there would be too many black belts out there. You've picked a pretty good roll model.

If you go back through the kenpo creed and the pledges for each belt, you come up with a pretty good list of desirable character traits. Not a bad place to start for trying to put it in words.

I've met kenpo black belts who were really sound in their knowledge of the art, men and women who had the highest personal standards and really tried to give back to the community, recognizing that they have something special. And then I've met those who don't come close on any level. When it comes down to it, I think the only thing the journey to black belt really ensures is that no one that doesn't have perseverance will "earn" one. That may sound pessimistic and I wish it weren't so. However, that conclusion is based on the anecdotal evidence that I've collected.

I'm responsible for me and I'm responsible for who I choose to teach. So far, the people I've taught have grown in maturity along with their belt promotions. I'd like to think I have a little to do with that, but maybe not. Do your best, hold your student to a high standard and encourage them to set their own high standards for when you're not around. Works for me.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
peterson_charlie@hotmail.com

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Joined: May 30th, 2008, 1:15 am

June 28th, 2008, 12:38 pm #7

I have a question I would like to ask of all the instructors out there.

I have my first crop of students who recently passed their last belt before Black, I would like to write a small book for them with guidelines on what it takes to get your Black Belt, that is apart from the syllabus material, what it IS to be a Black Belt and some general training and practice tips and advice.

The guys in question are junior black belt candidates-in-training ranging in ages from 13 to 15 years old, but I would like the book to be applicable for adults as well.

I was also going to talk about some aspects such as the Formulation Equation and how it fits into your training at this point, the importance of footwork and accuracy, etc.

I would like to ask those of you involved in testing Black Belt candidates what it is you look for during a test.

I was also going to use some really good quotes from Mr Parker as topics to discuss in the book, so if any of you have suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

LEAVE MORE DENTS
Mr. Nackord always emphasized the importance of being a gentleman, or lady as it pertained to being a black belt.

This is hard to put into words, so you, as their teacher must teach it to them in your own words one-on-one. A part of having an instructor is trusting in his or her wisdom. There's more to teaching than just showing the 24 per belt.

I'm not talking about being a Guru or proclaiming yourself king. If you want to fall hard, claim to be "all knowing" and watch the reaction when you stumble, as human beings tend to do.

Just share with your students the things that have helped you grow as a person both on and off the mats.

I believe that teens need this message as much as they need to learn form 3 correctly. The MA are about honor, discipline, respect, and all the other good stuff that makes a good person even better. Adults also need character development, especially me because I'm not perfect yet LOL.

One thing to shy away from is a hard-and-fast code of conduct and rules. If you have rules you have to enforce them. I believe that its better to influence and mirror what you would want a black belt to be instead of demanding it. No one is perfect and we all stumble so there shouldn't be any extremes but a message of how to conduct oneself outside the dojo.

Exactly what that entails, I'm not completely sure but we all have something to teach that can benefit our students.



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Joined: April 12th, 2006, 7:46 pm

June 28th, 2008, 4:43 pm #8

It was taught to me that being a black belt means to be of maximum service to your students and your community and to lead by example. I truly am in awe of the nonsense being said here. Look inside your heart and you will find what is right and what is wrong and pay no mind to foolish and ego driven discusions. My example is Master Bob White and i fallow his example as my students will fallow mine. It is wise to document curriculmn for your students, after all that's how we got here......Right? Best wishes....
Well put!
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Joined: March 21st, 2006, 10:58 pm

June 29th, 2008, 9:55 am #9

I have a question I would like to ask of all the instructors out there.

I have my first crop of students who recently passed their last belt before Black, I would like to write a small book for them with guidelines on what it takes to get your Black Belt, that is apart from the syllabus material, what it IS to be a Black Belt and some general training and practice tips and advice.

The guys in question are junior black belt candidates-in-training ranging in ages from 13 to 15 years old, but I would like the book to be applicable for adults as well.

I was also going to talk about some aspects such as the Formulation Equation and how it fits into your training at this point, the importance of footwork and accuracy, etc.

I would like to ask those of you involved in testing Black Belt candidates what it is you look for during a test.

I was also going to use some really good quotes from Mr Parker as topics to discuss in the book, so if any of you have suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

LEAVE MORE DENTS
As stated above, to be a BB for me its about more than just physical prowess. The mental state of a person and the right attitude is an integral part. You could have someone who is highly skilled but if they are an Ahole they won't be respected. Remember the old saying; Respect is earned and not commanded. Having said that obviously the skill has to be there too. Its about balance.
So for me a good BB has to have Leadership, Honour and Respect. Sound familar??
Later
Darren
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Joined: February 1st, 2005, 2:47 pm

June 30th, 2008, 2:49 pm #10

My apologies go to you for 'accidentally' turning your thread into a discussion of religion...sorry about that.
I know that zealots can turn anything into their own agenda.

However, that being said, all the religions I know of preach the betterment of the individual, so as such, a martial art should have the same effect.

Isn't that what 'Budo" is about?

That taken into account, my first Kenpo instructor, who will remain nameless, advocated testing yourself in real situations, plus would advise you in tournaments to not lose even if you are losing. In other words, use the Cobra Kai method, hurt your opponent if you can't win fair and square.

I learned some valuable physical skills from this individual, but also learned how NOT to teach a class.

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