hands in forms 2

Joined: December 18th, 2010, 6:39 am

December 18th, 2010, 7:02 am #1

hello, I would like to know the difference between forms 2
in short starts checking the rear hand
in the long run 2 front hand only?
sorry for my English, thanks.
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

December 18th, 2010, 3:30 pm #2

In short 2 we establish the rule of "never move in without a cover" (meaning cover hand).

In long 2, however, (keeping in mind the rule was already established) we are looking at full range of motion with the palm/poke (primarily since form 4 deals with full range of motion) 2+2=4. Keep in mind we are setting up five swords. Short two starts it, long 2 adds to it and form four finishes it.

Keep asking questions, my friend.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 6:36 pm

December 18th, 2010, 7:35 pm #3

hello, I would like to know the difference between forms 2
in short starts checking the rear hand
in the long run 2 front hand only?
sorry for my English, thanks.
1) Both step inside of and against the attack, the opposite of SF1 & LF1 which block to the outside of and step away from the attack.

2) In SF2 the left hand establishes the low hand check to the high hand block/strike position. This is seen in steps three and four, the simultaneous block/punch to 9 and 3.

3) In LF2 the left hand chambers because we use a forward bow. This is a constant point of reference for the neutral bow posture. The combination in LF2 is, block to the corner strike to the center line, strike to the centerline by rotating clockwise, rotate back counter clock with a centerline strike. Left hand assumes the checking position in SF2. Some will call that Cat Com.

4) SF1 & LF1 teach stepping back ball heel. SF2 & LF2 teach stepping forward Heel ball. So, in SF2 & LF2, if you push the elbow of your blocking arm forward with a correctly formed fist, you will be using a striking block, not a positional block. The striking block does not hold a position and needs no cocking to feed the chop. When done efficiently, you fall in to the chop. We're stopping the mass, not just the weapon.

6) Your checking hand follows the arm of the blocking hand to determine its checking position. Depth is important in SF2 because the transitional forward bow moves forward, not backwards like LF1. I learned about framing in SF2 & LF2 from SP Aguilar. Using your own anatomical dimensions is important to not overreaching or extending beyond the outer rim. That outer rim is as diverse and the Universal pattern by the way. Thanks to SP Aguilar for clarifying that important distinction.

Clark
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Joined: August 14th, 2004, 8:13 am

December 18th, 2010, 10:44 pm #4

hello, I would like to know the difference between forms 2
in short starts checking the rear hand
in the long run 2 front hand only?
sorry for my English, thanks.
I am completely lost! What was the question? Are you asking why the left hand chambers to the hip in the initial block?

Best in Kenpo,
Brye Cooper.
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Joined: December 18th, 2010, 6:39 am

December 20th, 2010, 3:17 am #5

Yes, the question was in the beginning that, but given the responses I have made it abundantly clear, if you have anything to add appreciate it, thanks.
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Joined: December 18th, 2010, 6:39 am

December 20th, 2010, 3:23 am #6

In short 2 we establish the rule of "never move in without a cover" (meaning cover hand).

In long 2, however, (keeping in mind the rule was already established) we are looking at full range of motion with the palm/poke (primarily since form 4 deals with full range of motion) 2+2=4. Keep in mind we are setting up five swords. Short two starts it, long 2 adds to it and form four finishes it.

Keep asking questions, my friend.
Thanks for the reply, I see that the system is a summation of information added at each level, will continue with questions.
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Joined: December 18th, 2010, 6:39 am

December 20th, 2010, 3:29 am #7

1) Both step inside of and against the attack, the opposite of SF1 & LF1 which block to the outside of and step away from the attack.

2) In SF2 the left hand establishes the low hand check to the high hand block/strike position. This is seen in steps three and four, the simultaneous block/punch to 9 and 3.

3) In LF2 the left hand chambers because we use a forward bow. This is a constant point of reference for the neutral bow posture. The combination in LF2 is, block to the corner strike to the center line, strike to the centerline by rotating clockwise, rotate back counter clock with a centerline strike. Left hand assumes the checking position in SF2. Some will call that Cat Com.

4) SF1 & LF1 teach stepping back ball heel. SF2 & LF2 teach stepping forward Heel ball. So, in SF2 & LF2, if you push the elbow of your blocking arm forward with a correctly formed fist, you will be using a striking block, not a positional block. The striking block does not hold a position and needs no cocking to feed the chop. When done efficiently, you fall in to the chop. We're stopping the mass, not just the weapon.

6) Your checking hand follows the arm of the blocking hand to determine its checking position. Depth is important in SF2 because the transitional forward bow moves forward, not backwards like LF1. I learned about framing in SF2 & LF2 from SP Aguilar. Using your own anatomical dimensions is important to not overreaching or extending beyond the outer rim. That outer rim is as diverse and the Universal pattern by the way. Thanks to SP Aguilar for clarifying that important distinction.

Clark
Thanks for the reply, I have been given much information I will use in my training.
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