Grip of Death

Grip of Death

Joined: September 19th, 2007, 11:04 am

October 25th, 2007, 8:24 pm #1

....was one of the first techniques that I was ever taught, and it's one of the ones that I still have trouble with in my practisings...So, give me a hand will ya' please? One of the biggest things for me is moving to the close kneel with the double hammerfists...I always feel like I'm falling over, so let's start there...
Thanks in advance to everyone willing to help,
Take Care...
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Joined: June 15th, 2005, 3:34 am

October 25th, 2007, 9:58 pm #2

"If you feel unstable, it's because you are." Many get this way because they step around the bad guy, rather than through him. Cut a path in your step that chips a corner off his edges, and stabilize your stance as a seperate isolation in practice before adding the hammerfists.
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Joined: September 23rd, 2007, 2:37 am

October 25th, 2007, 10:03 pm #3

....was one of the first techniques that I was ever taught, and it's one of the ones that I still have trouble with in my practisings...So, give me a hand will ya' please? One of the biggest things for me is moving to the close kneel with the double hammerfists...I always feel like I'm falling over, so let's start there...
Thanks in advance to everyone willing to help,
Take Care...
This may be a case of the blind leading the blind, as I am only a newly promoted green belt. Then again, it may be of use that I'm not as far removed from what it was like to answer the same questions for myself... We were taught that the attack is a 'wrenching' headlock - as if the attacker is trying to spiral you to the ground. You comply with their momentum. In so doing, your right leg will have to plant forward kinda hard - akin to the way you would stabilize yourself if suddenly shoved from behind. Due to the twisting nature of the wrench, your right leg should now be close to 10:30. The left leg follows immdediately afterward,(a half beat behind at most)driving your left knee into the side of his right leg as you hit your stance. If you're using a static headlock as the attack, then, yeah...I imagine it would feel awkward to shorten your stance into the close kneel with his weight already bearing down on you - it's Pincher time at that point. Hope that helps.
Last edited by DanPuleo on October 25th, 2007, 10:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 19th, 2007, 11:04 am

October 25th, 2007, 10:54 pm #4

"If you feel unstable, it's because you are." Many get this way because they step around the bad guy, rather than through him. Cut a path in your step that chips a corner off his edges, and stabilize your stance as a seperate isolation in practice before adding the hammerfists.
Doc, that helps...
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Joined: September 19th, 2007, 11:04 am

October 25th, 2007, 10:55 pm #5

This may be a case of the blind leading the blind, as I am only a newly promoted green belt. Then again, it may be of use that I'm not as far removed from what it was like to answer the same questions for myself... We were taught that the attack is a 'wrenching' headlock - as if the attacker is trying to spiral you to the ground. You comply with their momentum. In so doing, your right leg will have to plant forward kinda hard - akin to the way you would stabilize yourself if suddenly shoved from behind. Due to the twisting nature of the wrench, your right leg should now be close to 10:30. The left leg follows immdediately afterward,(a half beat behind at most)driving your left knee into the side of his right leg as you hit your stance. If you're using a static headlock as the attack, then, yeah...I imagine it would feel awkward to shorten your stance into the close kneel with his weight already bearing down on you - it's Pincher time at that point. Hope that helps.
...Thanks
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

October 26th, 2007, 1:04 am #6

....was one of the first techniques that I was ever taught, and it's one of the ones that I still have trouble with in my practisings...So, give me a hand will ya' please? One of the biggest things for me is moving to the close kneel with the double hammerfists...I always feel like I'm falling over, so let's start there...
Thanks in advance to everyone willing to help,
Take Care...
Perhaps it's interesting that for many years this technique wasn't done initially with a closed kneel stance - neither in the technique line nor the form. Personally I agree with your assessment in feeling uncomfortable swinging around into a closed kneel. Besides feeling less stable, the angle doesn't feel as natural, and I find I can't deliver as much power to the double hammerfists when dropping into this closed kneel. Just my nickel's worth.

Salute
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 8:31 pm

October 26th, 2007, 1:58 am #7

....was one of the first techniques that I was ever taught, and it's one of the ones that I still have trouble with in my practisings...So, give me a hand will ya' please? One of the biggest things for me is moving to the close kneel with the double hammerfists...I always feel like I'm falling over, so let's start there...
Thanks in advance to everyone willing to help,
Take Care...
The step to 10:30 as already mentioned is a big help in making the technique work. I have watched students make the step as though they were stepping around a tree.

If you don't step into a close kneel and buckle the attacker's right leg, then who's to say you couldn't deliver your left knee to back of thigh or upper tibia?

And (as Brad Billings reminded me recently) when you step step so your back straightens erect.

A similar technique is done in Dan Zan Ryu ju jitsu, except it's a right middle knuckle fist to the back of attacker's hand and (I think a left middle knuckle fist) to the spine. However, once the arms are loose, they grab the belt with the left hand and go for a hammer lock.
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Joined: September 19th, 2007, 11:04 am

October 26th, 2007, 2:47 am #8

Perhaps it's interesting that for many years this technique wasn't done initially with a closed kneel stance - neither in the technique line nor the form. Personally I agree with your assessment in feeling uncomfortable swinging around into a closed kneel. Besides feeling less stable, the angle doesn't feel as natural, and I find I can't deliver as much power to the double hammerfists when dropping into this closed kneel. Just my nickel's worth.

Salute
What's your recommendation then, Sir?
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

October 26th, 2007, 3:31 am #9

Tailoring - to do what works best for you. That aside, I understand the reason behind the close kneel, essentially to better protect one's groin. For me, however, I'd rather drop into a solid stance and, using marriage of gravity (Dave Hebler likes "drop your weight on the sucker!) add considerably more power to the two hammerfist strikes. The bottom line my groin isn't open for that long - perhaps a fraction of a second - and so I'm running the risk of trading a scoop for two hammerfists - groin and kidney - and I'll take it. But as Bruce Lee often said, what works for one guy may get another guy in serious trouble. So one has to make his or her own judgments - always remembering the words of our founder, "Not everyone wears a size 42 coat."


Salute
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Joined: March 4th, 2004, 6:13 pm

October 26th, 2007, 3:51 pm #10

"If you feel unstable, it's because you are." Many get this way because they step around the bad guy, rather than through him. Cut a path in your step that chips a corner off his edges, and stabilize your stance as a seperate isolation in practice before adding the hammerfists.
That is great advice Dave. You beat me to it.


Jamie Seabrook
www.jamieseabrook.com
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